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Rentals for one-fourth of the nonfarm rental vacancies included amounts for all utilities-heat, water, light, and cooking fuel.

The proportion was approximately the same for the rent groups between $30 and $100. Below $30 rental, utilities were less frequently included; and in the $100 or more rental, they were more often included. The practice of including all utilities in the rent was much

inside standard metropolitan areas than outside.

Year-round not dilapidated, not for rent or sale vacancies

more common

Available for sale vacancies

Approximately 2.0 percent or the total dwelling units in 1955 were intended for yearround use and were not dilapidated. Some were not on the available rent or sale market because they were already rented or sold (0.5 percent), and others were being held off the market for other reasons (1.5 percent). The percentage for the comparable group of vacancies in 1950 indicates little change for the United States whole. However, the rate in the Northeast declined slightly while those in the South and West (particularly the West) increased. In all regions except the Northeast, rural units contributed heavily

to this group of vacancies in both years.

The "for sale" vacancy rate was at the same level as in 1950--approximately 0.5 percent. Rural areas had a larger percentage than urban areas, but there was little difference between the rates for inside and outside standard metropolitan areas. The "for sale" vacancies comprise both new and used housing, by far the greater proportion being used housing.

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Vacant houses for sale inside standard metropolitan areas generally contained more rooms than those outside standard metropolitan areas. The medians were 5.3 and 4.6 rooms, respectively (table 4).

The rate for units already rented or sold but not yet occupied (0.5 percent) was fairly constant for the four regions, for inside and outside standard metropolitan areas, and for urban and rural areas (tables 1 and 2). The count of units in this group is often considered part of the potential supply of available housing because other units may become available when the new owners and renters move from their present quarters.

Turnover among vacancies for sale was not so great as among rental vacancies, as evidenced by the smaller proportion (one-sixth) which were vacant for less than a month. Houses which were vacant for four months or longer (over half the vacancies) were found in all price groups; a greater proportion of these units were located outside standard metropolitan areas than inside the areas.

Characteristics of the vacant units already rented or sold differ from the characteristics of vacancies being offered for rent or for sale. The comparison can best be made for nonfarm vacancies for which rent and value statistics were collected. Nonfarm vacancies already rented but not occupied had more rooms than vacancies being

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Table D.--NONFARM AVAILABLE VACANT UNITS AND VACANT UNITS

RENTED OR SOLD: SECOND QUARTER 1955

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Median number of rooms..... Percent vacant 4 months or

longer.... Median sale price for nonfarm units...

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INSIDE STANDARD METROPOLITAN AREAS

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For nonfarm vacancies available for sale, the median sale price was $10,200, which somewhat higher than the $8,500 median in 1950. Those inside standard metropolitan areas much higher priced and on the average contained more rooms than those outside such areas. The median sale prices were $12,400 and $6,500, respectively. As might be expected, the sale price

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offered for rent, and on the average were in a higher rent class. The comparison of units already sold with those offered for sale reveals a similar situation--the units were larger, as measured by number of rooms, and slightly higher in price. For units inside standard metropolitan areas, however, the median number of rooms was about the same but the sale price for those already sold was lower than for those offered for sale.

them were offered for rent or sale. Compared with the available vacancies, the dilapidated units were smaller (in terms of number of rooms), were in the lower rental and value classes, and on the

average had been vacant for longer periods of time.

Seasonal units

Approximately 2.6 percent of the total dwelling units in 1955 were vacant and nonresident units intended for seasonal use. This rate was practically the same as the rate

in 1950, which was 2.5 percent.

Units "held ofr the market" were located largely in rural areas. Although they were intended for year-round use, many were used only occasionally by their owners who lived elsewhere but cultivated the farm land. Others, not on farms, were reserved for servants, caretakers, janitors, and the like, or were held off the market for personal reasons of the owner. Included with the "held off market" vacancies are a few vacancies which were for year-round uge but which were temporarily occupied by persons with a usual place of residence elsewhere.

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Considering the type of units included in the "held-orr-market" vacancies, it is expected that a large proportion would be vacant for some time. At the time of enumeration, three-fifths had been vacant for four months or longer. The proportion for units outside standard metropolitan areas was somewhat higher than for those within such areas.

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Year-round dilapidated vacancies

Total seasonal units..... Inside standard metropolitan areas. Outside standard metropolitan areas.....

27 73

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Year-round vacancies which were dilapidated constituted 1.2 percent of the total housing in 1955. By region, the rates were about the same as in 1950. In 1955, the rates ranged from 0.5 percent in the Northeast to 2.5 percent in the South. The dilapidated vacancies

found largely in rural areas where there was little demand for housing and the units

were orten abandoned or neglected. Vacancies in the dilapidated group are among the units most likely to drop out of the housing inventory. Vacant units which were unfit for human habitation or dilapidated to the extent that they were no longer considered living quarters were not included in the housing inventory.

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Slightly less than one-half the seasonal units in 1955 were in

the Northeast, and the remaining half were about evenly distributed throughout the three other regions. The great ma jority were located in resort areas outside cities; a small proportion were on farms. Those connected with farms were generally for the use of seasonal farm workers--for harvesting, cotton picking, and the like.

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Vacation homes for use during the summer constituted roughly three-fourths of the seasonal units. The remainder consisted mostly of homes for migrant workers and homes in winter resorts.

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Comprises unoccupied units and units temporarily occupied by nonresidents, that is, persons with usual residence elsewhere.

Table 2.--VACANT DWELLING UNITS BY CONDITION AND STATUS, FOR THE UNITED STATES, URBAN AND RURAL, INSIDE AND OUTSIDE STANDARD

METROPOLITAN AREAS: SECOND QUARTER 1955 AND APRIL 1950

(Percent distribution)

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Table 3.--NUMBER OF ROOMS AND NUMBER OF DWELLING UNITS IN STRUCTURE FOR AVAILABLE VACANT DWELLING UNITS, FOR THE UNITED STATES,

INSIDE AND OUTSIDE STANDARD METROPOLITAN AREAS: SECOND QUARTER 1955 AND APRIL 1950
(PERCENT DISTRIBUTION. An available vacant unit is a unit which is for year-round use, is not dilapidated,

and is offered for rent or sale)

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NUMBER OF DWELLING UNITS

IN STRUCTURE Reporting... 1 dwelling unit. 2 dwelling units. 3 to 4 dwelling units......... 5 dwelling units or more.

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51 18 13 18

35
22
14
29

68
14
11
7

57
12
11
19

49
13
12
26

67
12
10
10

Table 4.--CHARACTERISTICS OF AVAILABLE VACANT DWELLING UNITS, FOR THE UNITED STATES, INSIDE AND OUTSIDE STANDARD

METROPOLITAN AREAS: SECOND QUARTER 1955

(Percent distribution)

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Table 5.--MONTHLY RENT AND SALE PRICE ASKED FOR NONFARM AVAILABLE VACANT DWELLING UNITS, FOR THE UNITED STATES, INSIDE AND OUTSIDE

STANDARD METROPOLITAN AREAS: SECOND QUARTER 1955 AND APRIL 1950

(Percent distribution)

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Table 6.--MONTHLY RENT BY NUMBER OF ROOMS, INCLUSION OF UTILITIES, NUMBER OF DWELLING UNITS IN STRUCTURE, AND DURATION OF VACANCY,

FOR NONFARM AVAILABLE VACANT DWELLING UNITS FOR RENT, FOR THE UNITED STATES: SECOND QUARTER 1955

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Table 7.--SALE PRICE ASKED BY NUMBER OF ROOMS, FOR NONFARM AVAILABLE VACANT DWELLING UNITS FOR SALE, FOR THE UNITED STATES:

SECOND QUARTER 1955

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28
51
19

25
58
17

32
52
16

11
74
15

55 45

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