Gambar halaman
PDF
ePub

past two years, owing chiefly to the greater number of bearings and investigations that have been conducted by the Commission, and the employment of additional inspectors of safety appliances.

Among the various other duties performed at times by this division is the preparation of the list of National, State, and local commercial and agricultural organizations of the United States, copies of inspectors' reports, market value of railroad securities, and other documents published or distributed by the Commission. More than 100,000 circular letters were sent out to postmasters and others in order that the list of commercial and agricultural organizations might be made as complete as possible.

The stenographic and typewriting force of this division is employed to take and transcribe the testimony at public hearings of the Commission, as well as to handle all of the other work involved in the performance of the official duties of the Commission. During the past year approximately 30,900 folios of testimony have been taken by these stenographers and transcribed. In all cases three copies of this testimony are made and in many of the proceedings several additional copies are called for by interested parties.

STATISTICAL DIVISION.

The regular work of the division of statistics is connected chiefly with the annual reports that carriers subject to the act are required to make to the Commission. This work embraces, among other things, the careful examination of the railway reports that are filed and the necessary correspondence relating to them. It also includes the compilation of data from the railway returns as described and the preparation of statistical reports based thereon. One of these reports, a volume of about 700 pages, is entitled “Annual Report on the Statistics of Railways in the United States." Another report, issued each year, is the “Preliminary Report on the Income Account of Railways in the United States," which is designed to show at the earliest practicable date the general results of railway operations.

For some time a comprehensive report, designated as "Railways in the United States in 1902,” has been in course of preparation under the direction of the statistician to the Commission. Of the five parts to comprise this report, Parts II, IV, and V, aggregating nearly 1,100 pages, large octavo, have been issued this year.

Not only has the routine business of the statistical division been subject to a constant internal growth since it was established in 1888, but the more or less direct demands of the public upon its facilities have also notably increased within the last few years as they have become better known.

A memorandum of certain particulars is here given as being to some extent suggestive of the work accomplished.

During the past year between five and six thousand letters and telegrams relating to the business of this division were sent to correspondents; also about 4,000 circulars of various kinds. There were also distributed among the railway officials about 3,300 forms for the annual report and 2,500 copies of the classification of operating expenses and of construction expenses of railways. About 900 report forms, very similar to the interstate form, were furnished to various State railway commissions, upon their request, for the use of railway companies in rendering their annual reports as State carriers to those commissions. During the year there were received more than 1,300 reports from the carriers, and some 5,500 letters, telegrams, and information circulars.

[blocks in formation]

Per cent.

33 54

Total

338, 008 The increase in the number of papers handled by this division as compared with the previous year is indicated by the following: Freight tariffs filed ... Passenger tariffs filed.. Letters accompanying ta

26 Concurrence notices filed

20 Correspondence filed

30 Correspondence mailed

34 Receipts mailed...

21 Statements and memorandums in connection with complaints..

121 This division has charge of tariffs and other papers relating to rates. The work in connection therewith is substantially the same as described in the thirteenth annual report.

The routine work of the division has not only increased by reason of the large number of tariffs filed, but the special work in complying with demands for information regarding tariffs filed with the Commission has been much greater than ever before.

The matter of complying with such demands, and especially the examination of tariffs and preparation of statements showing rates in effect at different periods, is growing more difficult with the accumulation of documents in the files.

As an indication of the amount of labor involved in keeping the records of the division and the examination of papers filed it may be stated that on the 30th ultimo there were 2,196,536 tariffs on file. In addition to the tariffs there were also 3,068,632 other papers relating thereto, exclusive of correspondence.

COMPLAINTS BEFORE THE COMMISSION. Since our last annual report to Congress 546 cases have been presented to the Commission. The complaints in these cases constitute the basis of all informal and formal proceedings before the Commission, and the number includes a few investigations ordered by the Commission upon its own motion. The number of contested cases and formal investigations instituted during the year was 84, and these involved directly the rates and practices of 306 carriers. The number of these cases in 1902 was 38, and in 1901 it was 19. Following is a brief statement of the complaints in formal proceedings docketed during the year, and the provisions of the law claimed to be violated:

No. 646. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of proposed advances in freight rates.

No. 647. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of import rates.

No. 648. Discrimination in the matter of supplying cars for shipment of coal from Jellico mines in Kentucky to Knoxville, Tenn. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 6.

No. 649. Greater rate on carload shipment of live stock to Chicago, Ill., for the shorter distance from Kearney, Mo., than for the longer distance from Kansas City, Mo. Sections 1, 3, and 4.

No. 650. Greater through rate on carload shipments of cotton seed from Clio, S. C., to Laurinburg, N. C., than the sum of local rates. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 651. Overcharge in passenger fare from Washington, D. C., to Moseley, Va., via Richmond. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 652. Embargo upon certain classes of freight (including hay) for points east of Versailles, Pa., Moundsville and Parkersburg, W. Va., causing delay in shipment of car load of hay from Columbus, Ohio, to Washington, D. C. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 653. Greater rate on flour from Aurora, Mo., for the shorter distance to Marked Tree, Ark., than for the longer distance to Memphis, and failure to keep rates posted at Aurora. Reparation claimed. Sections 4 and 6.

No. 654. Greater rates on various kinds and classes of property from Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore for the shorter distance to La Grange, Ga., than for the longer distance to Opelika, Ala. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 655. Unreasonable rates on shingles from Duluth, Minn., to Chicago, Ill., as compared with the rate on lumber. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 656. Unreasonable rate on hay from Johnstown, Alexandria, Granville, Pleasantville, and Baltimore, Ohio, to Wilmington, N. C., as compared with rate from Columnbus, Ohio. Sections 1, 3, and 4.

No. 657. Greater rates on bananas from Charleston, S. C., for the shorter distance to Greensboro, N. C., than for the longer distance to Lynchburg, Va. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 658. Discrimination in supplying cars for shipment of coal from Irwin, Johnstown, Jeannette, and Marchand, Pa., to various markets. Sections 2 and 3.

No. 659. Unreasonable and discriminating rates through failure to allow car-load rates on combined shipment to the same consignee. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 660. Discrimination in supplying cars at Bainbridge, Ohio, for shipment of cross-ties, and failure to print and keep posted for inspection schedules showing rates and charges for transportation of passengers and property. Sections 3 and 6.

No. 661. Unreasonable rates on cross-ties in carload lots from Bainbridge, Ohio, to Girard, Pa., as compared with rates on lumber between said points. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 662. Unreasonable and discriminating rates through failure to allow carload rates on combined shipments to the same consignee. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 663. Discrimination in the matter of supplying cars at New Holland, Ohio, for shipment of grain, and in furnishing facilities for unloading coal. Reparation claimed. Sections 2 and 3.

No. 664. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of the transportation of salt from points in Michigan to Missouri River points and intermediate localities.

No. 665. Discrimination in supplying cars for shipment of coal from Meyersdale and Keystone Junction, Pa., and unreasonable and unjust charge of 50 cents per ton where coal is loaded from wagons. Reparation claimed. ections 1 and 3.

No. 666. Discrimination against Harrisburg millers in milling-in-transit privileges on wheat, corn, rye, oats, and barley shipped from Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois points to New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 667. Higher rate on coal shipped from mines to Baltimore when carried by boat to Norfolk, Newport News, or Hampton than when carried to points outside the Capes, and discrimination in allowances for barging and discharging. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 668. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway.

No. 669. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway.

No. 670. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over the Chicago & Northwestern Railway.

No. 671. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over the Chicago Great Western Railway.

No. 672. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over lines operated by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway Company.

No. 673. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over the Illinois Central Railroad.

No. 674. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway.

No. 675. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over the Wabash Railroad.

No. 676. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on grain and grain products over the Chicago & Alton Railway.

No. 677. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of class and commodity rates from St. Louis to Texas common points in force over the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway.

No. 678. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of class and commodity rates from St. Louis to Texas common points in force over the St. Louis Southwestern Railway.

No. 679. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of class and commodity rates from St. Louis to Texas common points in force over the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad.

No. 680. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of class and commodity rates from St. Louis to Texas common points in force over the Missouri Pacific and other railways.

No. 681. Discrimination in favor of manufacturers owning logging railroads in rates on lumber, by means of so-called tap line divisions of rates. Sections 2 and 3. No. 682. Unreasonable and prejudicial rates on anthracite coal from Pittston and Towanda, Pa., to Gloversville, N. Y., as compared with rates on bituminous coal between same points. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 683. Unreasonable and unjust rate on chewing gum in less than 100-pound lots from Chicago and other points to destinations south of the Ohio and Potomac Rivers and east of the Mississippi River. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 684. Discrimination against Valley Center, Doyle, Avoca, Croswell, and Memphis, Mich., in supplying cars for shipments of hay and grain. Reparation claimed. Section 3.

No. 685. Higher rate on raw silk, such as waste silk, thrown silk, spun silk, tram, and organzine, than on dry goods (including manufactured silk), clothing, and other articles. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 686. Unreasonable and unjust advance in rates on machinery, carloads, from St. Louis, Mo., East St. Louis, Ill., and other points to Little Rock, Ark., and on cotton presses, cotton gins, and cotton gin machinery, straight or mixed carloads, from Little Rock, Ark., to Memphis, Tenn., and New Orleans, La. Sections 1 and 3.

No. 687. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of allowances to elevators by the Union Pacific Railroad Company.

No. 688. Unreasonable and unjust rates on dried fruit from Hemet, Cal., to Missouri River points and points east thereof, as compared with rates on onions and green apples. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 689. Unreasonable rates on freight for the shorter distance from Hanford, Cal., to points in other States east thereof than for the longer distance from San Francisco. Sections 2, 3, and 4.

No. 690. Prejudicial advance in rates on carload shipments of barrel staves from Provo and other points in Arkansas to Pacific Coast ter inal points. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 691. Excessive minimum carload weight, causing damage to shipment of peaches, and unreasonable rates on peaches and plums from points in Georgia to Eastern cities, as compared with like shipments to Western points. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 692. Relative rates from East St. Louis, Ill., to New York, N. Y., on cotton shipped in compressed square bales and in round bales. Sections 2 and 3.

No. 693. Discrimination in favor of export and against domestic shipments of cotton from points east of the Mississippi River to Atlantic and Gulf seaports, by means of the so-called distress rate. Sections 2, 3, and 5.

No. 694. Discrimination to the advantage of certain shippers by means of unlawful use of expense bills, in rates on cotton from Salem, Ala., and Columbus, Ga., to Savannah, Ga. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 695. Relative rates on cotton from Gibson, Ind. T., to St. Louis, Mo., when compressed in square bales and “Lowry” round bales. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 696. Greater rates on bananas for the shorter distance from Charleston, S. C., to Danville, Va., than for the longer distance from Charleston to Lynchburg and Richmond, Va. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 697. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates, facilities, and practices applied in the transportation, handling, and storage of grain carried from points in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Indian Territories to points in Texas.

No. 698. Unreasonable and unjust rates on lumber from points in Georgia to Chattanooga, Tenn., and other Ohio River points, as compared with rates on coal, pig iron, and other products. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 699. Excessive and prejudicial rates on fruit from points in Michigan to Chicago, Ill., and discrimination in favor of certain shippers in matter of unloading such shipments. Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6.

« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »