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twenty-sixth instant, claiming his seat in Council for the county of Chester; and thereupon,

Resolved unanimously, That Doctor Thomas Ruston cannot be admitted to take his seat as councillor for the county of Chester, that county being represented in Council by Colonel Richard Wil. ling, who was elected on the fifteenth day of October, 1788.

A return of the general election of a Councillor and Sheriffs, and Coroners, held in the county of Fayette, was received and read, by which it appears that Nathaniel Breading was duly elected Councillor, and Joseph Torrence and Joseph Hewston, Sheriffs, and Henry Beeson and Thomas Rogers, Coroners of the said county; whereupon,

Resolved, That Joseph Torrence, Esquire, be appointed and commissionated Sheriff, and Henry Beeson, Coroner of the said county.

The Council met.

PHILADELPHIA, Friday, October 30th, 1789.

PRESENT :
His Excellency THOMAS MIFFLIN, Esquire, President.
The Honorable GEORGE Ross, Esquire, Vice President.
James Read,

Samuel Edie, . .
Samuel Miles, Jonas Hartzell,
Abraham Smith, Christopher Kücher ? Esquires.

William Wilson, Zebulun Potts, Agreeably to the request contained in the letter from His Excellency the President of the United States, of the third instant, a draft of a Proclamation was laid before the Board, read, and agreed to as follows, vizt: Pennsylvania, ss: . By the President and the Supreme Executive Council of the Com

monwealth of Pennsylvania.

A PROCLAMATION. WHEREAS, The President of the United States hath transmitted to this Council, this Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, requesting that the same might be published and made known in this State in the following words, vizt: By the President of the United States of America:

A PROCLAMATION. Whereas, It is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the Providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be gratefull for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor:

And whereas, Both Houses of Congress bave by their joint committee, requested me “to recommend to the people of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with gratefull hearts, the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness."

Now therefore, I do recommend and assign Thursday, the twentysixth day of November next, to be devoted by the people of these States to the service of that great and glorious being, who is the beneficent author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be. That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks for his kind care and protection of the people of this country, previous to their becoming a nation ; for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Provi. dence in the course and conclusion of the late war; for the great degree of tranquility, union and plenty wbich we have since enjoyed; for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly, the national one now lately insti. tuted; for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed, and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing usefull knowledge, and in general, for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.

And also, that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the Great Lord and Ruler of nations, and beseech him to pardon our national, and other transgressions, to enable us all, whether in public or in private stations, to perform our sereral and relative duties properly and punctually; to render our National Government a blessing to all the people by constantly being a government of wise, just and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed; to protect and guide all sovereigns and nations, (especially such as have shewn kindness unto us,) and to bless them with good government, peace and concord; to promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease of science among them and us; and generally to grant unto all mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best. Given under my hand at the city of New York, the third day of

October, in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine.

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

Now, we, the President and Supreme Executive Council aforesaid, dò' recommend the said Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next, to be set apart and observed throughout this State as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, for the good and pious purposes expressed in the said Proclamation. Given in Council under the hand of His Excellency Thomas Niftlin,

Esquire, President, and the seal of the State, at Philadelphia, this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord, ove thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, and of the Commonwealth the fourteenth.

THOMAS MIFFLIN. Attest :-CHARLES BIDDLE, Sec’ry.

A return of the general elections of a Councillor and of Sheriffs and Coroners, held in the county of Allegany, and a return of the general election of a Councillor held in the county of Luzerne, were received and read, by which it appears that John Wilkins, Junior, was duly elected Councillor for the county of Allegany, and James Morrison and Samuel Evalt, Sheriffs, and David Watson and John McDowell, Coroners of the said county; and that Lord Butler, Esquire, was duly elected Councillor for the county of Luzerne.

On motion, - Resolved, That James Morrison be appointed and commissionated Sheriff of the county of Allegany, and Jacob Bousman and Samuel Sample of said county, be accepted as sure ties for his faithfull performance of the duties of his office according to law.

Resolved, That David Watson be appointed and commissionated Coroner of the said county of Allegany.

Lord Butler, Esquire, Councillor elect for the county of Luzerne, attended and was admitted to a seat at the Board, he having previously taken the oaths required by the Constitution of this State, and also the oath to support the Constitution of the United States, required by act of Congress, passed the first of June last.

On motion, Resolved, That Tuesday next be appointed for the election of a Measurer of wheat and other corn, and salt, in the room of John Biddle, Esquire, deceased.

Upon the recommendation of Chief Justice McKean, Judge Shippen, the petit jury, and many other respectable citizens, in favor of a certain Henry Gregemier, who was convicted at the last Court of Oyer and Terminer, held in the county of Philadelphia, of a robbery, and sentenced to undergo a servitude of five years at hard labour, &ca.

Resolved, That the said Henry Gregemier be pardoned, on condition of restoring the goods stolen or the value thereof.

Council Chamber.

PHILADELPHIA, Saturday, Oct'r 31st, 1789.

PRESENT:
His Excellency THOMAS MIFFLIN, Esquire, President.
The Honorable GEORGE Ross, Esquire, Vice President.

Samuel Miles, Christopher Kucher,
Abraham Smith, Richard Willing,
William Wilson, Zebulun Potts, Esq'rs.
Samuel Edie,

Lord Butler,
Jonas Hartzell,

The Council met.

PHILADELPHIA, Monday, November 2nd, 1789.

PRESENT

His Excellency THOMAS MIFFLIN, Esquire, President.
The Honorable GEORGE Ross, Esquire, Vice President.

James Read, Jonas Hartzell,
Samuel Miles, Lord Butler,
Richard Willing, Samuel Edie,
Zebulun Potts, Frederick Watt, (now ?

now ŞEsquires.
William Wilson, returned,) and
Abraham Smith, Christopher Kucher, j

The Council met.

PHILADELPHIA, Tuesday, November 3rd, 1789.

PRESENT:
His Excellency THOMAS MIFFLIN, Esquire, President.
The Honorable GEORGE Ross, Esquire, Vice President.
Samuel Miles, William Wilson, ?
James Read,

Lord Butler,
Abraham Smith, Frederick Watt,
Christopher Kucher, Jonas Hartzell, and a
Richard Willing, Samuel Edie,

Zebulun Potts, Mr. Lutz, Mr. Neville and Mr. Lilly, a committee from the Gen. eral Assembly attending, were introduced, and informed Council that the house was now met and ready to receive any business which Council might have to lay before them.

The committee were informed that a nessage was preparing, and would be laid before the House this day, together with several public papers which have been received since the last adjournment of the Assembly.

A draft of a message from Council to the General Assembly was laid before Council, read and approved, as follows, vizt: A Message from the President and the Supreme Executive Coun- ,

cil to the General Assembly : GENTLEMEN :-We herewith transmit letters from his Excellency the President of the United States, of the second and third days of October, 1789, with several acts and resolves of the Congress of the United States, which have been received since the last adjournment of the Legislature, vizt:

An Act to establish the Judicial Courts of the United States.

An Act to regulate the process in the Courts of the United States.

An Act to explain and amend an act for registering and clearing vessels, regulating the coasting trade, and for other purposes.

An Act to recognize and adopt to the Constitution of the United States, the establishment of troops raised under the resolves of the United States in Congress assembled, and for other purposes therein mentioned.

An Act providing for the payment of the Invalid pensioners of the United States.

An Act making appropriations for the present year.

An Act to allow the Baron de Glaubeck the pay of Captain in the army of the United States.

An Act to alter the time for the next meeting of Congress, and a resolution for continuing John White, John Wright and Joshua Dawson in office untill the fourth day of February, 1790 ; also a letter from Alexander Hamilton, Esquire, Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, dated September the twenty-sixth, 1789, inclosing two resolutions of the House of Representatives of the United States, dated the twenty-first of the same month, respecting the public debts.

A copy of the amendments proposed to be added to the Consti. tution of the United States.

Two letters from Henry Knox, Esquire, Secretary at War, of the sixth and nineteenth of October, 1789, inclosing an extract of an act of Congress, dated the twenty-ninth day of September, which authorizes the President of the United States to call into service from time to time, such parts of the militia as he may judge neces. sary for the protection of the inhabitants of the frontiers of the United States, from the hostile incursions of the Indians, and requesting a list of persons entitled to pensions by the laws of this State.

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