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lative value is every day diminishing by had a bilious complaint, against which the prodigious in Aux of wealth, real and our family physician declared, that fea artificial, which for some time past has bathing would be particularly servicebeen pouring into this kingdom. Hic able. Therefore, though it was my own therto however I have found my income private opinion that my daughters nerves equal to my wants. It has enabled me might have been as well braced by mornto inhabit a good house in town for four ing rides upon the Northamptonshire months of the year, and to reside amongst hills, as by evening dances in the public my tenants and neighbours for the rooms, and that my wife's bile would remaining eight with credit and hospi- have been greatly lessened by compliance tality. I am indeed myself fo fond of with her husband, I acquiesced ; and the country, and fo averse in my nature preparations were made for our journey, to every thing of hurry and bustle, that, These indeed were but flight, for the if I consulted only my own taste, I should chief gratification proposed in this scheme never feel a wish to leave the shelter of was, an entire freedom from care and my own oaks in the dreariest season of form. We lhould find every thing rethe year; but I looked upon our an- quisite in our lodgings; it was of no nual visit to London as a proper compli- consequence whether the rooms we should ance with the gayer disposition of my occupy for a few months in the summer, wife, and the natural curiosity of the were elegant or not; the fimplicity of younger part of the family : besides, to say a country life would be the more enjoythe truth, it had its advantages in avoid- ed by the little shifts we should be put ing a round of dinners and card parties, to; and all necessaries would be providwhich we must otherwise have engaged ed in our lodgings. It was not there. in for the winter season, or have been fore till after we had taken them, that branded with the appellation of unfoci- we discovered how far rçady furnished able. Our journey gave me an opportu- lodgings were from affording every artinity of furnishing my study with some cle in the catalogue of necessaries. We new books and prints; and my wife of did not indeed give them a very scrugratifying her neighbours with some or- pulous examination, for the place was nainental trifles, before their value was so full, that when we arrived late at sunk by becoming common, or of produc- night, and tired with our journey, all ing at her table, or in her furniture, the beds at the inn were taken up, and some new invented refinement of fashion- an easy chair and a carpet were all the able elegance. Qur hall was the first accommodations we could obtain for our that was lighted by the lamp d'Argand; repose. The next morning, therefore, and I still remember how we were grati: we eagerly engaged the first lodgings we fied by the astonishment of our guests, found vacant, and have ever since been when my wife with an audible voice called difputing about the terms, which from to the foot-man for the tongs to help to the hurry were not sufficiently ascerthe asparagus with. We found it pleasant tained ; and it is not even yet settled whe. too to be enabled to talk of capital artists ther the little blue garret which serves us and favourite actors; and I made the as a powdering room, is ours of right better figure in my political debates from or by favour. The want of all sorts of having heard the most popular speakers conveniences is a constant excuse for in the house.

the want of all order and neatness, which Once too, to recruit my wife's fpirits, is so visible in our apartment; and we after a tedious confinement from a lying- are continually lamenting that we are in, we passed a season at Bath. In this obliged to buy things of which we have manner therefore things went on very such plenty at home. well in the main, till of late my family It is iny misfortune that I can do nohave discovered that we lead a very dull thing without all my little conveniences kind of life; and that it is impoffible about me; and in order to write a comto exist with comfort, or indeed to enjoy a mon letter I must have iny ftudytable tolerable share of health, without spend, to lean my elbaws on in fedentary luxing good part of every summer at a ury; you will judge therefore how little Watering-plece. I held out as long as I I am able to employ my leisure, when I could. One may be allowed to resist the tell you, that the only room they have plans of dillipation, hut the plea of health been able to allot for my use is fo filla cannot decently be withstood.

ed and crowded with my daughters hatIt was foon discovered that my eldest boxes, band-boxes, wig-boxes, &c. that I daughter wanted bracing, and my wife can scarcely move about in it, and am

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On Watering Places. this moment writing upon a spare trunk in all the arts of low cunning and chifor want of a table. I am therefore dri- The spirit of greediness and rapaven to faunter about with the rest of the city is no where to confpicuous as in party; but instead of the fine clumps of lodging-hqales. At our fear in the countrees, and waving fields of corn I have try, our domestic concerns went on as by been accustomed to have before my eyes, clock-work; a quarter of an hour in a I see nothing but a naked beach, almost week settled the bills, and few tradeswithout a tree, exposed by turns to the men wilhed, and none dared, to prac. cutting eastern blast, and the glare of tise any imposition where all were known, a July fun, and covered with a fand and the consequence of their different equally painful to the eyes and to the behaviour must have been their being fect. The Ocean is indeed an object of marked, for life, for encouragement or unspeakable grandeur ; but when it has for distrust. But here the continual flucbeen contemplated in a storm and in a tuation of company takes away all recalm, when we have seen the sun rise gard to character; the most respectable out of its bosom and the moon silver its and ancient families have no influence extended surface, its yariety is exhaust- any farther than as they scatter their ed, and the eye begins to require the ready cash, and neither gratitude nor fofter and more interesting Icenes of refpect are felt where there is no bond cultivated nature. My family have in- of mutual attachment, besides the ne. deed been persuaded several times to ceflities of the present day. I should be cnjoy the sea still more, by engaging in happy if we had oniy to contend with a little failing party, but as, unfortn- this fpirit during ņur prefent excursion, nately, Northampton hire has not afa but the effect it has upon fervants is forded them any opportunity of becom- most pernicious. Our family used to be ing seasoned failors, these parties of remarkable for having its domettics grow pleasure are always attended with the grey in its service, but this expedition most dreadful fickness. This likewise has already corrupted shein; two we I am told is very good for the consti- have this evening parted with, and the rution; it may be so for aught I know, rest have learned lo much of the tricks but I confess I am apt to imagine that of their station, that we thall be obligtaking an emetic at home would be equal. . ed to discharge them as foon as ly falutary, and I am sure it would return home. In the country, I had he more decent. Nor can I help imagi- been accustomed to do good to the poor; ning that my youngest daughter's lover there are charities here tov; we have has been lels afsiduous, fince he has joined in a subscription for a crazy poetcontemplared her in the indelicate fitua, efs, a rafile for the support of a fharption of a thip cabin. I have endeavoured er, who passes under the title of a to amuse myself with the company, but German Count, and a benefit play for without much success; it consists of a a gentleman on board the Huiks. Un. few very great people, who make a set fortunately, to balance these various by themselves, and think they are en- expences, this place, which happens to titled, by the freedom of a watering plac, be a great resort of smugglers, affords to indulge themselves in all manner of daily opportunities of making bargains. polifonneries, and the rest is a motley We drink tpoiled teas, under the idea group of sharpers, merchants' clerks, of their being cheap, and the little room kept mistresses, idle men, and nervous we have is made Tess by the reception

I have been accustomed to be of cargoes of india tafferys, shawl-mullins, nice in my choice of acquaintance, espe- and real chintzes. All my authority cially for my family; but the greater here would be exerted in vain; for, Í part of our connections here, are such do not know whether you know it or as we should be ashamed to acknowledge no, the buying of a bargain is a any where else, and the few we have temptation which it is not in the nature fçen above ourselves will equally dif- of any woman to refiit. I am in hopes claim us when we meet in town next however the business may receive some winter. As to the settled in habitants little check from an incident which of the place, all who do not get by us happened a little time since: view us with dilike, because we raise quaintance of our's returning from Marthe price of provisions; and those who gate, had his carriage seized by the Cufdo, which, in one way or other, compre. tom-house officers, on account of a piece hends all the lower class, have lost every of fisk, which one of his female cousins, trace of rural fimplicity, and are versed without his knowledge, had ftowed in it

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and it was only released by its being been inhabited by the rats, and where proved that what the had bought with the poverty of the landlord prevents to much fatisfaction as contraband, was hiin from laying out more in repairs in reality the home-bred manufacture of than will serve to give them a fhowy Spital-fields.

and attraćtive appearance. Be that as My family used to be remarkable for it may, the rooms we at present in-regularity in their attendance on public habit are so pervious to the breeze, that worship; but that too here is numbered in spite of all the ingenious expedients amongit the amusements of the place. of lifting doors, paiting paper on the 1.ady Huntingdon has a Chapel, which inside of cupboards, laying fand bags, dometimes attracts us ; and when nothing puttying crevices, and condemning clolete promises us any particular entertain- doors, it has given me a severe touch ment, a tea-drinking at the rooms, or a of

my

old rheuinatism, and all my family concert of what is called sacred music, are in one way or other affected with is sufficient to draw us from a Church, it; my eldest daughter roo has got cold where no one will remark either our with her bathing though the sea water abfence or our presence. Thus we dai- never gives any body cold. ly become more lax in our conduct, for In ansiver to these complaints, I ain want of the falutary restraint imposed up- told by the good company here, that on us by the consciousness of being looked I have fiayed too long in the fame air, up to as an example by others.

and that now I ought to take a trip to In this manner, fir, has the season the continent, and fpend the winter at paft away. I spend a great deal of money Nice, which would complete the busiand make no figure; I am in the coun- nefs. I ain entirely of their opinion, that try and fee nothing of country simplici- it would complete the busincts; and have ty, or country occupations; I am in an therefore taken the liberty of laying my obscure village, and yet cannot ftir out

case before you; and am, fir, without inore observers than if I were

Your's &c, walking in St. James's Park; I am cooped

HENRY HOMELOVE, up in less room than my own dog-kennel, while my spacious halls are injured by Standing empty; and I am paying for To the Editor of tbe Monthly Magazine. tasteless unripe fruit, while my own SIR, under the trees.-In recompenle for all mand the approbation of mankind, this, we have the satisfaction of knowing and those persons to whom fociety, are that we occupy the very rooms which indebted for benevclent in gitutions, my Lord - had just quitted; of picking convenient accommodations, or beneficial up anecdotes, true or false, of people erections, have a greater dalın on the in high life; and of seizing the ridicule gratitude and attachment of their cotemof every character as they pass by us poraries, and on the veneration of poftein the moving thow-glass of the place, a rity, than either the statesman or chieftain pastime which often affords us a good can pretend to, who in the cabinet or in deal of mirth, but which, I confess, I can the field concerts or executes measures never join in without reflecting that which strengthen the hand of power by what is our amusement is their's likewise. violating the principles of humanity, and As to the great oftenfible object of our the natural unalienable rights of our excursion, health, I am afraid we cannot fellow beings? boast of inuch improvement. We have Few men who reflect credit on the had a wet and cold sumner; and these present age, have stronger pretensions houses, which are either old tenements ihan Mr. BURDON, one of the worthy vamped up, or new ones slightly run up representatives of the county of Durham, for the accomodation of bathers during to the approbation and esteem of the the season, have more contrivances for public. With a view to benefit the letting in the cooling breczes than for community in the district in which he keeping them out, a circumstance which relides, a few years since, he formed a I should presume sagacious physicians do most excellent road between the opulent not always attend to, when they order towns of Sunderland and Stockton, with patients from their own warm, compact, scarcely any pecuniary assistance ; by the lubstantial houses, to take the air in completion of which the farmer is en. country lodgings, of which the best abled to carry his produce to market apartments, during the winter, have only with the greatest case and dispatch, and

lands certain

choice wall-fruit is rotting by bufnels works of general utility juftly de

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Improvements by Mr. Burdon. lands have rapidly increased in value be- takings, the celebrated Mr. Charwell, yond the most fanguine cxpectations of lo elegantly characterized by the author the respective proprietors. Till this of the Guardian, in the ninth number of communication was opened, the inter- that excellent compofition. course between the two places was at- The very material advantages which tended with equal hazard and difficulty, were immediately experienced on openoccasioned by low swampy lands, and by ing a communication between Stockton a variety of other obstructions. These and Sunderland, suggested the idea of evils are now happily remedied by the forming a road between the latter place ercetion of bridges, and by a very exten- and Newcastle ; for that

rpose Mr. live causeway, the execution of which Burdon requested a meeting of the genreflects the highest credit on the abilities elemen of property, to whom he pointed and discernment of the indefatigable pro- out the benefits likely to result from the jector.

undertaking, and proposed entering into Castle Eden, the residence of Mr. a subscription to defray the necessary exBurdon, is situated in a country neither pences. It was allerted on this occasion remarkable for its fertility nor population; that the toils which were to be collected to promote the former he is continually under an act of parliament to be obtained exerting those efforts which will allurede for that purpose, would assuredly, in a ly, lead to the accomplishment of his fhort space, pay an extraordinary intewishes; to complete the latter, and rest for the money advanced; yet his armost important design, he hasencouraged guments, supported as they were by the erection of an extensive cotton manu

reason and by experience, did not appear factory, in which multitudes of men, to carry conviction, and the atsistance women, and children, are continually afforded him was, in every point of view, employed. The numerous habitation's truly inconsiderable.

Far from being for the persons engaged in this under- discouraged by the timidity of those who taking, and for shopkeepers, to supply were less sanguine, he determined them with every necessary article, carry the plan into execution, even has given the portion allotted for though he thould be left to sustain the this purpose the appearance of a consi- whole of the expenditure to complete the derable settlement. A market is also great design. 'It became necessary to established, which is plentifully supplied erect a bridge over the river Wear, every Thurfday with meat, vegetables, which has recently been executed in the &c. of the best quality. Schools are

vicinity of Sunderland, in a manner formed, under proper management, for which incontestibly evidences the public the instruction of the younger members spirit, and the fuperior genius of Mr. of this fociety, who are carefully prin- B. This noble structure is undoubtedly cipled both in their religious and moral superior to any thing of the kind at preobligations ; constant attendance on di- fent existing in Europe. It consists of vine service is strictly enjoined on all who one spacious arch, 236 feet in span, and are not disabled by sickness or other in- 100 in height : the navigation is by no firmities; and every circumftance indi- means impeded, as ships of considerable cates that if public events are favourable, burthen can sail under it, without lowerthis place will quickly rise to an impor- ing their p-mafts ; the buttresses are of tant station in this northern part of the ftone, the bridge itself of cast iron, exiland. The church, which became too. cepting a small proportion, which is small co contain the increase of inhabi- wrought; the boldnels and elegance of tants, has within a few moriths been al- the design equally gratifies and surprizes most entirely rebuilt on a very enlarged every judicious and every curious béand crmmodious plan, at the expence of holder ; and has been exccuted at the Mr. Burdon ; and the regulations which expence of about 25,000i. of which sum are framed for the good and orderly go- 19,000l, has been adyanced by Mr. Lur, vernment of the numerous body engaged

don. Your's, &c. in the manufactory, will, under Provi.

Sunderland, Aug. 22, 1796. dence, be productive of thote confequences which will ensure their eternal To the Editor of the Monthly Magazine. and temporal prosperity! In a word, SIR, the worthy, proprictor of Castle, Eden In the last Paper which I took the listands highly distinguished as a valuable berty of addrefling to you, upon the member of the community, and appears structure of the Wesh tongue, it was anxious to emulate, by useful under- mentioned, that it had an affinity with

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דרכי שאול ביתה יורדות .Heb אל-חדרי מות

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דרך ביתה יצעד .Ilebrew

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תתברך צורנו .IIbrew

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certain other languages therein specified ; Blessed , art thou, O Lord, our I shall now lay before you a few parti- God, king of the world.'' culars, in order to give some idea of its 2. Seat of increase art thou, Supreme, our connection with the Hebrew.

intelle&tual power, posteljor of the space of In the following comparison, I have revolution.—Literal. adhered mostly to the corresponding forms of expression ; for it would exceed your limits to show the identity between fimple words, as they are so numerous ;

1. Dareci sheol bethah ioredoth el. and this mode too, if telerably well fe. chaderi mäcth. lected, gives a much greater illustration Welsh. 2. Dyracei sal buth-hi ea-wared. to the subject.

edb ill cadeiriau mêtb. BAN (Welf) what is raised, rcared, i. The road of the grave her house, or conspicuous ;-raised, cxalted, high. going down to the chambers of death. - Banau, heights, conspicuous things, or 2. That leads to vileness is ber abodi, heads ; Beni, raised or reared ones.

going the defceni to the jeats of failing:Hebrew, 12 Ben, a fon ;-D 2892 Literal. . BENI ELIM, fons of powers, 1. e. mighty ones ; Welsh, Beni ELYV, rcared ones 1. Derech bethah iitsengad. of powers.

Welsh. 2. Dyrac buit-ki ai-i-fengy.. Banäu (!cl) to raise, to rear, to 1. The road of her house he would tread. erect, to make lofty, or conspicuous.-- 2. The avenue of her dwelling he would -- Banı, to rear, tổ make lofty ;

go to tread.Literal. become high.-Hebrew, n70) BANAH, 10 build ; -70X ABANAH,

1. Tithbârach tsoreinu. obtain children'. “I may be builded”;

Welch. 2. Ti-haedh-barwch faer-ei-ni. Web, A-BANWY, that I may rear; • Be thou blessed, our former." Y-BANWY, I may be raised.

2. Thou take to bylaf ibe flate of increase, BEICHIAW (Velfb) to cry, to roar, to wail.-Helreru, i BECIIAH, to

our former.-Literal, weep. CAN (Wels) with, or in possession ;

1. Mageni ngal clöim. CANIAW, to possess.--Hebrew, yap

Welsh. 2. Meigen-i bwyl elyv. CANAII, to poffefs.

1. My shield is from God.

2. My protection is from the intelligences. CHWAR (Wel/b) animal motion, activity; - quick, Frisk.--Hebrew, 917 of life ;-Welsh, El chwai, intellectual power of the quick.

1. Mc hua ze malec hacâvodh Jehovali CHWEIAW (Welsh) to be brisk or trebaoth hua malcc hacâvodh.-Selah! quick; to make quick.-Hebreu, 1977 2. Py yw-o ly maeloc y-cavad 1-A-YwCHAIAH, to live ;-- Dinne vo sarwrod JW-o maeloc y-cavad.—Sela. MECHAIEH METHIM, thou dost ani- “Who is the king of glory? The mate the dead ones; Welfb, MYCHWEII Lord of hosts, he is the king of glory. METHION, thou dost quicken those that Selah.” have failed.

2. H'ho is he that is poffeffor of attain. Sentences compared.

ment? I THAT AM HIM of bosts, be is

the polleffor of attainment-Benoid! 'rtebrew. Byllang adonai-eth cal

The following are some more Wella nêoth Tangcob.

words similar in found to the name—IEWels. By-llwng adon--ydh holl neuodh Iago.

Ilyvi, I am. The Lord has Vwallowed up-all the tabernacles of Jacob.

A-VI-J'7-(-VO, that was, is, that tal be.

IVyv-Q-BYV, I am that I am.

Ilv-1-0, I am him. 1. Baruch attah eiâ eloeinu mélech la-you-ve, supreme is he. hangolam.

la-you-vo, fupreme is hiin. IV «il). 2. Baruch wytti iả cl-eini mael- E-yw-vo, he is hiin. 3-izul-ma.

Everycu-vo, he is him.

E-yW-a-vu,

מגני עלאלהים .iletreet

.

מי הוא זה מלך הכבוד .Hebrece יהוה צבאות הוא מלך הכבוד EL C}{Ar, God אל חי-; CHAI, life סלה

1.

Ltd בלע אדני-את כל נאות יעקב

HOVAH.

ברוך אתה יי אלהינו .Hebrew מלך העולם

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