Gambar halaman
PDF
ePub

122 SALE OF LANDS ACQUIRED UNDER THE RECLAMATION ACT

Taxation.-Copp v. West Virginia (1911), 71 S. E. 580, 35 L. R. A. N. S. 669, would seem to hold that where the United States sells land in installments the land so sold is not taxable by the State until all installments are paid to the United States. But see Baltimore Shipbuilding Co. v. Baltimore, 195 U. S. 375, which, semble, is to the contrary.

Sec. 2. [Conveyance of title-Limitation of 160 acres to a person. ]That upon payment of the purchase price, the Secretary of the Interior is authorized by appropriate deed to convey all the right, title, and interest of the United States of, in, and to said lands to the purchaser at said sale, subject, however, to such reservations, limitations, or conditions as said Secretary may deem proper: Provided, That not over one hundred and sixty acres shall be sold to any one person. (36 Stat. 895.) Textual note.-See textual note under section 1.

Sec. 3. [Proceeds to credit of irrigation project.]—That the moneys derived from the sale of such lands shall be covered into the reclamation fund and be placed to the credit of the project for which such lands had been acquired. (36 Stat. 895.) Textual note.See textual note under section 1.

WITHDRAWAL OF PUBLIC NOTICES

An act to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to withdraw public notices issued under section 4 of the reclamation act, and for other purposes." (Act February 13, 1911, ch. 49, 36 Stat. 902)

[Sec. 1. Withdrawal of public notices—Modification and abrogation of water-right applications and contracts.]—That the Secretary of the Interior may, in his discretion, withdraw any public notice heretofore issued under section four of the reclamation act of June seventeenth, nineteen hundred and two, and he may agree to such modification of water-right applications heretofore duly filed or contracts with water users' associations and others entered into prior to the passage of this act as he may deem advisable, or he may consent to the abrogation of such water-right applications and contracts and proceed in all respects as if no such notice had been given. (36 Stat. 902.)

Textual note.—This act is codified as section 468, title 43, United States Code. As codified the act reads as follows:

"468. Withdrawal of notice given and modification of applications and contracts made prior to February 13, 1911.-The Secretary of the Interior may, in his discretion, withdraw any public notice issued prior to February 13, 1911, under section 419 of this chapter, and he may agree to such modification of water-right applications duly filed prior to February 13, 1911, or contracts with water users' associations and others, entered into prior to February 13, 1911, as he may deem advisable, or he may consent to the abrogation of such water-right applications and contracts, and proceed in all respects as if no such notice had been given. (February 13, 1911, ch. 49, 36 Stat. 902.)"

NOTES

Authority of Secretary.—The Secretary of the Interior has no general statutory authority to suspend, even temporarily, public notices issued by him pursuant to section 4 of the act of June 17, 1902, of lands irrigable under reclamation projects, nor does he possess supervisory power to do so in the absence of a specific statute authorizing it. (Departmental opinion, December 31, 1923, in re Shoshone Irrigation Project, 50 L. D. 223.)

* Popularly known as the Curtis Act, being so named for Senator Charles Curtis, of Kansas.

RELINQUISHMENT OF SECOND-FORM LANDS

An act to amend section 5 of the act of Congress of June 25, 1910, entitled “An act to

authorize advances to the 'reclamation fund,' and for the issue and disposal of certificates of indebtedness in reimbursement therefor, and for other purposes." (Act February 18, 1911, ch. 111, 36 Stat. 917)

[Sec. 1. Entries prior to June 25, 1910—Disposal of relinquished lands.]—That section five of an act entitled "An act to authorize advances to the ‘reclamation fund,' and for the issue and disposal of certificates of indebtedness in reimbursement therefor, and for other purposes," approved June twenty-fifth, nineteen hundred and ten (Thirty-sixth Statutes at Large, page eight hundred and thirty-five), be, and the same hereby is, amended as follows:

Sec. 5. That no entry shall be hereafter made and no entryman shall be permitted to go upon lands reserved for irrigation purposes until the Secretary of the Interior shall have established the unit of acreage and fixed the water charges and the date when the water can be applied and made public announcement of the same: Provided, That where entries made prior to June twenty-fifth, nineteen hundred and ten, have been or may be relinquished in whole or in part, the lands so relinquished shall be subject to settlement and entry under the homestead law as amended by an act entitled 'An act appropriating the receipts

from the sale and disposal of the public lands in certain States and Territories to the construction of irrigation works for the reclamation of arid lands,' approved June seventeenth, nineteen hundred and two (Thirty-second Statutes at Large, page three hundred and eighty-eight).” (36 Stat. 917.)

NOTES

Amendment.-Section 10, act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat. 686), amends this act.

Establishment of farm unit.-Under the act of June 25, 1910, as subsequently amended, lands reserved for irrigation purposes are not subject to settlement or entry until the Secretary of the Interior shall have established the unit of acreage per entry and announced that water is ready to be delivered, and no exception to the rule can be made in favor of an applicant who seeks to make an additional entry of such lands in the exercise of a preference right acquired by contest. (Departmental decision, Bert Scott, April 21, 1921, 48 L. D. 85.)

Entries affected.—This act applies to all entries embracing lands reserved for irrigation purposes made prior to June 25, 1910, which have been or may be relinquished, where the entrymen, by means of the provisions of the act of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 835), prohibiting entries for such lands until public notice of water charges, etc., has been issued, have been or may be prevented from realizing the value of the improvements placed by them on their entries by selling such improvements to others desiring to make entry for the lands upon relinquishment of the existing entries therefor. (Fredrek Steebner, 43 L. D. 263.)

The provision that upon relinquishment of an entry within a reclamation withdrawal the lands so relinquished shall be subject to homestead settlement RELINQUISHMENT OF SECOND-FORM LANDS

125

and entry under the reclamation act, has reference only to lands covered by second-form withdrawals, and has no application to lands withdrawn under the first form. (Annie G. Parker, 40 L. D. 406; Ernest Farrington, 40 L. D. 627; Robert H. Williams, 41 L. D. 68. General Land Office instructions of January 25, 1921, 47 L. D. 625.)

The act contemplates only entries legally made prior to the act of June 25, 1910, and afterwards relinquished, and has no application where the former entry was one in form only and in legal contemplation a mere nullity, having been erroneously allowed while the lands were embraced in a first form withdrawal under the reclamation act. (Annie G. Parker, 40 L. D. 406.)

The act has no application where cancellation of the entry was the result of a contest and not of a relinquishment. (Fred V. Hook, 41 L. D. 67.)

It is applicable only to entries under the reclamation act and can not be in. voked as to entries canceled prior to the reclamation act or made before and afterwards canceled for fraud. (Ethel M. Catron, 42 L. D. 7.)

It applies only to entries of record next previous to the passage of the act of June 25, 1910, and can not be invoked upon the basis of a relinquished entry preceding the entry of record at the date of the passage of the act. (Fred Anderson, 45 L. D. 504.)

Effect of relinqu'ishment.-Upon relinquishment of an entry made prior to June 25, 1910, within a reclamation withdrawal, the lands so relinquished became subject generally to settlement and entry under the homestead law, subject to the provisions of the reclamation act, and there is no authority for further limiting the right of entry of such lands. (Lena Hektner, 42 L. D. 462.)

Lands uncovered by conformation not relinquished.-Where a homestead entry covering lands within a reclamation withdrawal is conformed to a farm unit, the lands thereby uncovered are not relinquished within the meaning of this act, and are not subject to entry thereunder. (Robert H. Williams, 41 L. D. 69.)

Canceled entry revived.--This homestead entry of lands within a reclamation withdrawal, allowed after the entryman had in good faith purchased the relinquishment of a prior entry for the same land under this act, is permitted to remain intact, notwithstanding the prior entry had been canceled though not noted as canceled upon the records of the local office at the time the relinquishment was filed and the entry in question allowed, it appearing that the transaction was in entire good faith and neither the prior entryman, the present entryman, nor the local officers had actual knowledge of the cancellation at that time. (Fredrek Steebner, 43 L. D. 263.)

The rule that no application to enter shall be received until proper notation of the cancellation of a prior entry is made upon the records of the local land office was adopted for administrative purposes and designed primarily for the protection of the rights of contestants and will not be applied with the same strictness in cases solely between the Government and an entryman or an applicant for entry. (Idem.)

Miscellaneous.-See section 5, act June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 835), and notes thereunder.

See sections 1-4, inclusive, general reclamation circular, approved May 18, 1916 (45 L. D. 385).

DISPOSITION OF SURPLUS WATERS AND COOPERATION IN

IRRIGATION WORK

An act to authorize the Government to contract for impounding, storing, and carriage of

water, and to cooperate in the construction and use of reservoirs and canals under reclamation projects, and for other purposes.1 (Act February 21, 1911, ch. 141, 36 Stat. 925)

[Sec. 1. Sale of excess water-Distribution to individual users-Restriction-Fixing of charges—Limitation on price to water users.]—That whenever in carrying out the provisions of the reclamation law, storage or carrying capacity has been or may be provided in excess of the requirements of the lands to be irrigated under any project, the Secretary of the Interior, preserving a first right to lands and entrymen under the project, is hereby authorized, upon such terms as he may determine to be just and equitable, to contract for the impounding, storage, and carriage of water to an extent not exceeding such excess capacity with irrigation systems operating under the act of August eighteenth, eighteen hundred and ninety-four, known as the Carey Act, and individuals, corporations, associations, and irrigation districts organized for or engaged in furnishing or in distributing water for irrigation. Water so impounded, stored, or carried under any such contract shall be for the purpose of distribution to individual water users by the party with whom the contract is made: Provided, however, That water so impounded, stored, or carried shall not be used otherwise than as prescribed by law as to lands held in private ownership within Government reclamation projects. In fixing the charges under any such contract for impounding, storing, or carrying water for any irrigation system, corporation, association, district, or individual, as herein provided, the Secretary shall take into consideration the cost of construction and maintenance of the reservoir by which such water is to be impounded or stored and the canal by which it is to be carried, and such charges shall be just and equitable, as to water users under the Government project. No irrigation system, district, association, corporation, or individual so contracting shall make any charge for the storage, carriage, or delivery of such water in excess of the charge paid to the United States except to such extent as may be reasonably necessary to cover cost of carriage and delivery of such water through their works. (36 Stat. 925.)

Textual note.-Section 1 of the Warren Act is codified as section 523, United States Code, the introductory word "That" being omitted, and reference being made to "chapter 14 of this title" instead of to "the act of August eighteenth, eighteen hundred and ninety-four."

NOTES Contract to supply water.—Under the provisions of the reclamation act, June 17, 1902, and the Warren Act, February 21, 1911, the Secretary of the Interior is authorized and has the power to contract with an irrigation district for supplying water to such district, or partially supplying it with water, for the irrigation of the lands therein and for the drainage of other lands within such

1 Popularly known as the Warren Act, being so named for Senator Francis E. Warren, of Wyoming

« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »