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LXXXIII.

WOMAN.

W

HAT is there in this vale of life

Half so delightful as a wife,
Where friendship, love, and peace com-

bine

To stamp the marriage-bond divine ?
The stream of pure and genuine love
Derives its current from above;
And earth a second Eden shows,
Where'er the healing water flows.

Cowper.

LXXXIV.

WOMAN.

S

HE was a woman of a steady mind,

Tender and deep in her excess of love;
Not speaking much, pleased rather with

the joy
Of her own thoughts; by some especial

care,
Her temper had been framed, as if to make
A Being, who by adding love to peace,
Might live on earth a life of happiness.

WORDSWORTH.

LXXXV.

WOMAN.

HE reason firm, the temperate will,

Endurance, foresight, strength and skill;
A perfect woman, nobly planned,
To warn, to comfort, and command;

And yet a spirit, ftill and bright,
With something of an angel light.

WORDSWORTH.

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LXXXVI.

WOMAN.

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F ever angels walked on weary earth,
In human likeness, thou wert one of

them.
Thy native heaven was with thee, but

subdued
By suffering, life's inevitable lot;
But the sweet spirit did assert its home
By faith and hope, and only owned its yoke
In the strong love that bound it to its kind.

LXXXVII,

THE CATHOLIC FAITH.

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HAT anciet Fathers thus expound the

page,
Gives truth the reverend majesty of

age ;
Confirms its force, by binding every teft ;
For best authority's next rules are best.
And still the nearer to the spring we go,
More limpid, more unfoiled the waters flow.

In doubtful questions 'tis the safest way
To learn what unsuspected ancients say ;
For 'tis not likely we should higher foar
In search of Heaven, than all the Church before :
Nor can we be deceived unless we fee
The Scriptures and the Fathers disagree.

I think those truths their sacred works contain,
The Church alone can certainly explain :
That following ages, leaning on the past,
May rest upon the Primitive at last.

DRYDEN.

LXXXVIII.

TRADITION.

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UPPOSE we on things traditive divide,

And both appeal to Scripture to de

cide :
By various texts we both uphold our

claim,
Nay, often ground our titles on the same ;
After long labour loft, and time's expense,
Both grant the words, and quarrel for the sense ;
Thus all disputes for ever must depend,
For no dumb rule can controversies end :
Thus, when you said, Tradition must be tried
By Sacred Writ, whose sense yourselves decide,
You said no more, but that yourselves must be
The judges of the Scripture sense, not we.
Against our Church tradition you declare,
And yet your clerks would fit in Moses' chair ;
At least 'tis proved against your argument,
The rule is far from plain, where all dissent !

DRYDEN.

LXXXIX.

THE SABBATH.

EAM on us brightly, blessed day,

Dawn softly for our Saviour's fake ; And waft thy sweetness o’er our way, To draw us heavenward when we

wake.

O holy lise that shall not end,

Light that will never cease to be, May every Sabbath-day we spend Add to our happiness in Thee.

A. L. Waring.

XC.

THE SABBATH.

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SUNDAY well spent
Brings a week of content,

And health for the toils of the

morrow:

But the Lord's Day profaned,
Whatsoe'er may be gained,
Is a certain forerunner of sorrow.

Sir MATTHEW Hale.

S

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