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XLVIII.

OLD AGE.

N

OR can the snows, which now cold age

hath fhed
Upon thy reverend head,

Quench or allay the noble fires within.
For all that thou hast been, and all that

youth can be, Thou’rt yet-fo fully still doft thou Poffefs the manhood and the bloom of wit. To things immortal time can do no wrong, And that which never is to die, for ever must be young.

Cowley.

asa

XLIX.

THE CHURCH.

HE has a charm, a word of fire,

A pledge of love, that cannot tire ;
By tempests, earthquakes, and by wars,
By rushing waves and falling stars,

By every sign her Lord foretold,
She fees the world is waxing old ;
And through the last and direst storm
Descries, by faith, her Saviour's form.

L.

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THE ABBEY JUMIEGES.
GLORIOUS remnant of the Gothic

pile
(Which once was Rome's) ftood

[graphic]

half apart

In a grand arch,—which once screened

many an aisle ; The last had disappeared,—a loss to art, The first yet frowned superbly o'er the soil,

And kindled feelings in the roughest heart Which mourned the power of time and temper's

march, In gazing on that venerable arch.

BYRON.*

LI.

LEBANON.

ID the deep silence of the pathless wild,
Where kindlier Nature once profusely

smiled,
Th' eternal cedars stand; unknown their

age,
Untold their annals in historic page!
All that around them stood, now far away,
Single in ruin, mighty in decay !

[graphic]

* Copied by the Editor from the ruins A:D. 1839, where “ the lame Lord,” as the Sacristain said, had carved them twenty years previous, and whose visit he well remembered.

Between the mountains and the neighbouring main
They claim the empire of the lonely plain.
In folemn beauty through the clear blue light
The leafy columns rear their awful height!
And they are still the same ; alike they mock
Th’invader's menace and the tempest's shock;
And ere the world had bow'd at Cæsar's throne,
Ere yet proud Rome's all-conquering name was known,
They stood; and fleeting centuries in vain
Have poured their fury on the enduring fane,
While in the progress of their long decay
Thrones sink to dust and empires melt away.

G. HOWARD.

LII.

LIBERTY.

OMPULSION, from its destined course,

The magnet may awhile detain; But, when no more withheld by force,

It trembles to the North again.

Thus, though the idle world may hold
My fetter'd thoughts awhile from Thee,
To Thee they spring, when uncontrolld

In all the warmth of liberty.

LIII,

CORRECTION.
FORD, as a tender mother day by day
Weans the weak babe she loves, left it

should pine,
So wean us, Lord, fo make us wholly

Thine, Left in our feebleness we start away From Thy loved chastening; for we could not bear The sudden vision of ourselves and Thee, Or learn at once how vain our bright hopes be. Then be our earthly weakness, Lord, Thy care, And e'en in wounding heal, in breaking spare.

BISHOP WILBERFORCE.

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LIV.

CONTROVERSY.
E calm in arguing, for fierceness makes

Error a fault, and truth discourtesy.
Why should I feel another man's mif-

takes

More than his fickness or his poverty? In love I should: but anger is not love, Nor wisdom neither; therefore, gently move.

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Calmness is great advantage : he that lets
Another chafe, may warm him at his fire,

Mark all his wanderings, and enjoy his frets ;
As cunning fencers suffer heat to tire.
Truth dwells not in the clouds; the bow that's there
Doth often aim at, never hit, the sphere.

GEORGE HERBERT.

LV.

THE SOUL.

NOW'ST thou the value of a foul im

mortal ? Behold the midnight glory, worlds on

worlds !

Amazing pomp! Redouble this amaze; Ten thousand add; and twice ten thousand more; Then weigh the whole, one foul outweighs them all.

YOUNG.

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LVI.

MUSIC.

[graphic]

IKE Music on the waters,

Is thy sweet voice to me:
When as if its found were causing,
The charmed ocean's pausing,

The waves lie still and gleaming,
And the lull’d winds seem dreaming.

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