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their interests at home. If the Legis- Mr. COOLIDGE. I admit all that. these exigencies do arise. I say that lature is composed of such men as I Mr. P. D. WARNER. Will the gen- in such a State as this, it is nothing think it ever ought to be, and I hope tleman allow me to interrupt him? more than right that the Legislature ever will be-men of business, of Mr. COOLIDGE. Certainly. in of the State should be called together thought, of experience--men whose in-· Mr. P. D. WARNER. I think in re- as often as once a year. But, says the terests at home do more or less de- lation to this subject of taxing the gentleman from Wayne, “ this is a matmand their attention, then certainly national banks, the Legislature sought ter of expense." It is no more å matthe very résult which the gentleman to comply with the provision of the ter of expense than it would be for the has stated will always follow. There United States statute; but that was Governor to call them together. is no worse legislation in the world opposed by those who were interested Mr. McCLELLAND. Will the genthan that which is made by impatient in the national banks. It was finally tleman allow me to interrupt him again? men, wishing to be away from the hall suggested by them that they would Mr. COOLIDGE. Certainly. of legislation. And I should expect pay the specific tax levied upon them, Mr. MCCLELLAND. The differprecisely those results would follow, although it was levied without author-ence between the gentleman from Berwhich have followed in this State; Ility of law, if the Legislature would rien and myself I can explain in a very should expect just such legislation as not levy upon them the tax which few words. The expense of a regalar... we have had. It is said furthermore, by the United States law they were session of the Legislature is from sixty that when legislation is hurried the authorized to levy.

to seventy-five thousand dollars. I do.. amount of it will be much greater. Mr. COOLIDGE. What is the mean- not know what was the expense of the That is true, and every man knows it. ing of that? I do not understand it. last session; but I am told it was greater Just in proportion as your legislators Here was an act of Congress requir- than that of any previous session. You are hurried and impatient, just in pro-ing certain things to be done. The cannot hold a general election in the portion will your volumes of laws be Legislature had the right to make State for less than sixty or seventy-five voluminous; everybody knows that. provision for a tax to be levied upon thousand dollars. That, with the ex

I can easily see that exigencies may these banks. They attempted to do pense of a session of the Legislature, will arise, that they do arise as a matter of so, and made a blunder. I do not find make one hundred and fifty thousand fact, when annual sessions of the Leg- any fault with them for that. Yet my dollars. Then there are the people islature are demanded; exigencies friend from Oakland, (Mr. P. D. WAR- who will be to the expense of going to which could not have been foreseen. NER,) says that those men holding the and returning from the polls; say Take, for instance, the action of the capital in the banks came to the State seventy-five thousand of them; Legislature last winter. I refer to it and said: “You need not be very that will make at least seventysimply as an illustration, nothing more particular about the laws you pass, for five thousand dollars more. Thus the I have nothing to say against that Log- we will voluntarily pay the money." expense will be not less than two hunislature at all; I have no more fault Mr. P. D. WARNER. I did not dred and twenty-five thousand dollars. to find with that than with other Leg- make the explanation in justification of An extra session called by the Governislatures. It has been said here that the action of the Legislature, but toor, would be a short one if limited as ... the national banks of this State, having say that the members acted understand- it is now, to twenty days; and it could capital mostly in United States securi- ingly. ::

not cost by any possibility more than ties, to the amount, I think, of about Mr. COOLIDGE. They did not twenty or thirty thousand dollars. So $4,800,000, were very much interested act understandingly; if they had so the difference is between twenty thou-.'... in the legislation of last winter. By acted they would have passed laws that sand or thirty thosand dollars, and the act of Congress of 1864, the shares were correct. Furthermore, without two hundred thousand or two hundred of the stockholders of those banks are casting the least blame upon the Leg- and twenty-five thousand dollars. subjected to State taxation, to an ex

islature, I will say that this was done Mr. COOLIDGE. I will not undertent not exceeding that imposed upon in the hurry of the session, when they take to compute how much it will cost : other banks and moneyed institutions. wished to get home. If they had had à voter to go to and return from the The Legislature of last winter at- | an opportunity to look over the de- polls, and how much his time is worth. tempted to pass a statute adapted to cisions of the Supreme Court of the I do not think that is a matter to be the act of Congress, of June, 1864. United States, which had already been taken into the calculation at all, and I . They made a mistake; and every law- published, they would have found what will not do it. Nor am I satisfied at : yer and every judge in the State, I errors they had fallen into...

all that this is a matter of much econ. suppose, knows that act to be uncon-1 In renlv to my friend from Wayne, I omy." I think facts have been adduced stitutional. The Supreme Court of MR

: Of|(Mr. MCCLELLAND,) I admit that the here to show that this question of the United States have passed upon šovernor has power to summon the leconomy does not amount to anything. that question, and have decided it.

Legislature together whenever he Take the single instance I have Now if we had annual sessions of the

pleases. But I would a great deal named; suppose the expenso of a sesLegislature, the Legislature which

rather provide in the organic law of sion of the Legislature is seventy thouwould meet here next winter would

the State that the Legislature shall sand dollars; the single instance I correct that mistake. In that single

assemble year after year, as a require- have named will show that a session of... instance, provided these banks do not

ment of the Constitution, than leave it the Legislature, by passing a proper : pay their tax voluntarily, there would

to the judgment of a single man, as law in that single case, will save the be saved to the State over forty-eight

frail and human as you and I are. If Legislature forty-eight thousand of thousand dollars...

he is a good man, he will be loth to that seventy thousand dollars. I will Mr. MCCLELLAND. Will the gen- exercise that power on account of the not pretend nor intimate that this is a tleman permit me to interrupt him a expense which it will be to the State. solitary case. But it is one in which moment ?

If he is not a good man he may refuse you can estimate the amount saved by Mr. COOLIDGE. Certainly. to exercise the power when it is neces- dollars and cents. But there are in

Mr. MOCLELLAND: Cannot the sary. The question of the gentleman terests in this state that cannot be Governor call an extra session of the from Wayne is an argument in favor computed by dollars and cents; cases Legislature ?

Tof my amendment. He admits that I of loss to the State because the Legis

IN HU

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lature was not in session. There is an to pay; when there is no legal obliga- the rural districts, they can find out economy which is very expensive. My tion to pay, they will not be likely to with very little trouble what the law is own opinion is that there is economy do so.

at the present time. Now, what is the to the State in having annual instead. Mr. CONGER. I do not consider objection to this re-publication? Is it of biennial sessions...

this amendment as one of vital interest,. the expense? If that is so, then why I would say, further to the gentleman although I consider it a very important not file all the laws with the secretary from Wayne, (Mr. MCCLELLAND,) that one. I rise simply to make one or two of state, and let the people find out it does not follow that, because we suggestions in regard to the objections what they can about them? have annual sessions of the Legigla- | which have been urged here against It is not true that there has been unturé, therefore we must have annual annual sessions. I submit to gentle- necessary legislation in this State. elections of senators and representata- men of this committee, that if they will There has been no State in this Union, tives. From my present view of the take any of our session laws, for the anywhere from the Atlantic to the Pamatter, I would not be in favor of that. last, seventeen years, and reduce the cific, and from the lakes of the North I think that item of the expenses must actual amount of new legislation which to the gulf in the South, there is no be struck out of the calculation. The has been passed by any Legislature to State in this Union with such diversified expense on account of elections would its own strict limits, it would occupy interests demanding legislation as this be no greater in the case of annual a pamphlet very little larger than a new, young, giant State of ours. There sessions than in the case of biennial New England primer. But in the is no State in this Union that has such sessions.

Constitution of 1850, there is this pro- an extensive lake or sea coast. There But the great argument in my esti- vision:

is no State in this Union that has such mation is this; if we are to have laws, "No law shall be revised, altered or an extensive interest. There is no State let us have those which are salutary amended by reference to its title only; but in this Union where there are so many

o the act revised, and the section or sections of thousands and thousands of miles of una correcu. Do not debus. davo ses the act altered or amended, shall be re-enactsions of the Legislature in which mem- ed and published at length."

streams supplying the means of conveybers are so hurried that they bundle This is the source of a great portion ing the wealth of the State, in its pine. up fifteen, twenty, thirty or more bills, of our laws; there is the secret of our and other lumber, as in the State of without thought or reflection, and then voluminous laws. That section tells Michigan. There is no State in this have to make an apology whenever its own story in a very few words. Union that needs such continued watchthose bills or laws are called in ques. That is what has swelled the volume of fulness, such continued care, such contion. I say that that legislation is not our laws so much; the provision of the tinued guardianship and zeal in the the wisest or the most economical; but Constituition requiring a re-publication Legislature, year by year, to meet the the wisest and most economical legis of every act that is revised, of every growing wants and interests of this lation is that which is correct, and section altered or amended, in any par- glorious State of ours. adapted to the wants of the State. And ticular whatever. Gentlemen may look Talk about the expense of annual I say furthermore that the amount of over these Session Laws and find a sessions of the Legislature in a State laws will be less where the Legislature section which has not been altered that may become the richest State in is called together annually and given more than one or two words an act in the Union; that has beneath its soil time, without being hurried and con- which fifteen :or twenty words have and above its soil more wealth than fused, to pass properly upon the sub- been changed; and yet that whole act any other State in the Union. This jects presented to them for their con- has been re-published in our Session State has lacked development because sideration. Legislation will be pro-Laws, whenever so revised, altered, or it did not have proper legislation; befuse just in proportion as it is hurried. amended.

cause we do not take a large and, exThat is true as a matter of fact, both Now, the gentlemen composing the pansive view of the material interests in the history of this State and of Convention of 1850 thought it was of this State; it has lacked developevery other State. There is an item better for the interests of the people of ment more from that cause than from of expense to be considered on the this State, for the information of all any other cause whatever. I tell you other side, in connection with the the people throughout the State, that that if there had been proper legislaprinting of bookş, of their distribution, the laws should be republished when- tion for this State of Michigan; if there and everything else. I am not tena- ever they were altered, in order that had not been lost to this State in its cious in regard to this matter. I have the whole law as the amendment left infancy the paltry amount of five milreally not given the subject as much it should be before the people, and they lions of dollars; if it had not been for thought as its magnitude deserves. not be required to turn over one volume the swaddling clothes in which this

Mr. MUSSEY. Does the gentleman of session laws after another in order State was placed, and which has really mean to say to this. Convention, I to find out what was the law on any created in the minds of the people of that the amount of forty-eight thou-l particular subject. That additional this. State the great bug-bear of exsand dollars, which he says would have expense of publication, that additional travagance and expenditure, and has been collected from the national banks volume of our session laws arose prevented the legislation commensurate under a proper law, is over and above from the desire to have the session with the demands of its interests, this what we would receive now as the law laws contain the revised and amended State would have to-day outstripped stands?

act or section. That was all very well Illinois, which started in the race long Mr. COOLIDGE. I understand that probably, and very desirable at that after we did; would have outstripped a portion of the tax has been paid vol- time." The people of this State have Wisconsin, which but a few years ago untarily this year by the banks; a por- other business to do than to set down was merely a single county of this tion has not been paid. This State as lawyers may do and trace back the State. And yet to-day Wisconsin is has no guarantee that another dollar law from any amendment of it, through far ahead of Michigan in population of it will be paid by them. I do not the revised and compiled laws, and and developed wealth; to-day Illinois believe that it will be; for I do not un- they do not begrudge the expense of is far ahead of Michigan. We are rederstand that banking institutions any publishing large volumes of the laws, ferred to those States as having been more than other institutions, will pay so that when they come before our jus- extravagant in some matters, in their except when there is a legal obligation tices of the peace, and our people in railroads and in their other public im

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provements. And yet they loom up former Legislatures, and it will be the pen within the next two years before head and shoulders above our own fault of future Legislatures. I think the Legislature shall again meet. The State in material prosperity and mate- that years will have to pass before the legislation is passed, even though it rial advancement !

people of Michigan awake to a realiz- may not be all that is desired, to en. Now, I ask gentlemen of this com- ing sense of the importance of their deavor to bridge over, by some kind of mittee, to consider that the more fact State, and of the necessity of nourish- a frail structure, the coming two years, that the five million loan in the early ing, cultivating and fostering its inter- so that business may be caried on history of this State was not all receiv- ests, and of encouraging immigration to without too much interruption for want ed, and what was received happened come within its borders. Now, this of legislation. I submit to every gento be squandered--that fact and that one single consideration, the necessity tleman who has ever been in the Legalone in its influence upon the fears of encouraging from year to year the islature whether a great many argu. and prejudices of the good people of great and growing interests of the ments in favor of proposed measures Michigan, has retarded its growth, stop- State, of giving more time for men to for the amendment of laws, have not ped its advancement, and left it a sec- think of these things,is what in my mind been that they would be needed before. ond or a third rate State among the calls imperatively for this action at our two years would have passed away western States; when from its position, hands. I am not making a Fourth of And, I submit also, whether another its wealth, its material tesources, and July oration now. These remarks are great portion of that legislation has the intelligence and activity of its in- not spread-eagle remarks. The people not arisen from the fact that there has habitants, it should have stood first of the United States know to-day, just been too little time taken for the purand foremost among all these western as well as I know, and you know, that pose of preparing and digesting the States. Yet it does not. It is hardly Michigan is not advancing as it should, laws which have been passed. They known in the old world as a place to because it is curbed and crippled by have been passed by the Legislawhich emigrants should come. I can the provisions of its Constitution and ture under a pressure of crowded stand on the shores of St. Clair river its legislation. Who comes into the business, and the supreme court, in any day during the season of nåviga- State of Michigan with his wealth to many instances, have been compelled tion, and I can see vessels loaded with build up manufactories on our rivers? | to decide the laws to be unconstitu

emigrants passing by to Minnesota, Il-Who comes here with his capital to con- tional; and the next Legislature must · linois and Wisconsin. I can see the centrate and develop our resources ? struggle through in their blindness and

docks of the Grand Trunk depot filled No one; no one seeks for a place in this darkness to see if they could not pass with emigrants, waiting for propellers State to make a 'permanent home, un- some law that would be constitutional. to take them away from Michigan, and less by chance through the chinks of lég- I have said, in my place in the Legiscàrry them a thousand miles around islation he sees some little opening for lature, that I thought it extremely its shores, in order that they may get present personal advantage. To-dạy doubtful whether any law could be to another State. Why? Not be- the benefits of all the industrial pur- passed which would not run against cause other States suit the emigrants suits of the northern part of this State, the Constitution somewhere. And I better; not because there are more the accumulations of wealth from the doubt very much whether half the laws desirable locations in Minnesota, Illi- energy and capital employed there, do that have been passed are not now unnois and Wisconsin than in our State; not stop in Michigan. We stand here constitutional, and would be so denot because the climate and the soil are the richest of all the States in natural clared, except that the courts, thinking more congenial to those Norwegians or resources, and yet foreigners come in there must be some laws in the State Germans coming to the west; but be- here and carry off the net proceeds to meet the necessities of the case, cause there is nobody in the State of of those resources out of the State, have allowed them to pass for the Michigan who cares whether they come and very little of it remains here. Not present. here or not; or rather because the one-hundredth part of our mines are I said at the commencement of my angel stands with his drawn sword and owned in Michigan, not one-twentieth I remarks that I did not consider this warns the foreigner from coming here part of our pine lands are owned by proposition one of vita mom to what may be his Eden. That is the Michigan men. The proceeds of al deemed it an important one. For more truth. These provisions which were large portion of our pine lands and self Tam in favor of annual sessions of engrafted in our Constitution, and mines go into the pockets of foreign- the Legislature and biennial which are scattered all through our ers. I do not know but that is the This article propose laws, are the cause of this. There is no case with our manufacturing interests. I elected for the term of four years: onecollected voice of our people to encour- There is no inducement for men to half to be elected every two years. It age emigration, and to promote the come and settle here, and develop the was thought proper that there should growth of this State. That is a sad resources of this State. Unless some-be one branch of the body which is to truth; it is one that weighs upon the thing shall be done to promote the prepare the laws for this State. minds of our thinking men, when they prosperity of Michigan, all this wealth which is to act as the guardians of see the prosperity of other States, and and capital flowing so freely into other the interests of this state. who should it makes them almost desirous to leave States, will be kept out of the State,

continue along with some degree of here and go where there is some life, until we have gone to our silent homes permanency, in order that its members · enterprise and advancement in the in- and a wiser and better generation of might have some knowledge of what dustrial interests of the State; where men shall take our places.

. laws had been passed, so as to be able the whole object of the people does not! I make these remarks because they to avoid crude legislation, and be able seem to be to confine by constitutional relate to the question of economy, il to prepare our laws hereafter with more provisions and laws all the interests of which has been suggested here. I will regard to their fitness and perpetuity. the State within such a narrow com- I make some other remarks. With the With annual sessions and biennial elecpass that they cannot be developed, I experience of some three terms in the tions, every member who serves the and that nobody can enjoy them. Señate, I know that at least one-fourth first term, although he may be new

That was the fault of all former of the legislation of each term is for and unused to the business of legislaConventions, and it is the fault of this the purpose of providing for contin- tion when he is elected, will come here Convention; it has been the fault of gencies which, it is feared, may hap-l for the second term, with the adyan

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tage of the experience and knowledge, then we far better have remained at gate of the indebtedness of the State which is to be acquired from one ses- our homes. I had almost said we had of Michigan. . . sion of the Legislature. Therefore, the better leave this State, and go to some. For my part I am in favor of this second term of that two years would other where there is more progress, section as it stands. I think we have be the valuable term of the Legisla- more life, more desire for development all the laws that we need now. If the ture for the State of Michigan. It would and the placing of the State in its gentlemen who represent us in the be the term where there would be no proper rank among the other States of Legislature think it necessary to pass really new members, but where all the Union. Sir, I hope that we will more new laws, then they can let the would have more or less experience in have first and foremost in view, that old ones alone. legislation. They would all have been which will be best for the future happi- Mr. STOCKWELL. I move that the here one term, during which they had ness and prosperity of our State, so committee rise, report progress, and passed laws, and about which when that when we are done here we can ask leave to sit again.. they returned home, they could con- look back on our work with pride and The motion was agreed to. verse with their constituents, and when satisfaction.

. The committee accordingly rose; and they came back here again, they would Mr. W. A. SMITH. I am in favor of the PRESIDENT having resumed the be better prepared than ever before to the section as reported by the commit-Chair, pass good laws, and to amend and tee, especially that portion of it which Mr. PRINGLE reported that the alter the bad ones..

provides for biennial sessions of the committee of the whole, pursuant to .. The vital matter in my mind, the Legislature. I do not believe with the the order of the Convention, had had most important, is that of providing gentleman from St. Clair, (Mr. CONGER,) under consideration the article entitled that senators shall hold their office for that all the emigration from the old “Legislative Department;" had made the term of four years, the half being country passes around us to go to some progress therein, and had directed elected every two years. With that Illinois, Wisconsin and other States, on him to ask leave for the committee to provision, I do not consider the matter account of the want of proper laws in sit again. of annual sessions of quite so great the State of Michigan. I do not be- Leave was accordingly granted. importance as it would otherwise be. lieve that those emigrants understand Mr. HOLMES. Imove that the ConAnd yet it is my firm belief that annual what are the laws of Michigan or Wis- vention now take a recess. :: sessions is a question of very vast im- consin. Therefore, that cannot be the The motion was agreed to; and acportance to the people of Michigan. cause of their going around the State cordingly, (at five minutes past 12 For myself, although it may be that of Michigan and locating in other o'clock, p. m.,) the Convention took such things should not control either Western States. Look at our books a recess until 3 o'clock p. m. me or other gentlemen here, I know of statutes since 1850. Every session that my constituents expected that this of the Legislature has amended the Convention would provide for annual laws passed at the former sessions.

laws passed at the former sessions. ... AFTERNOON SESSION. ... sessions. I know that on my return Look over the session laws of last winhome occasionally during the session ter and you will find there something , th

The Convention re-assembled at 3 of this Convention, business men, old like two hundred amendments of our o'clock p. m., and was called to order members of the Legislature, men en statute laws. Are the laws of to-day by the PRESIDENT. gaged in various branches of business, any better than they were ten years

are. The roll was called, and à quorum have asked me about the business of ago, after all the amendments which answered to their names. this Convention. The very first ques- have been made to them? I hold that ... CORRECTION OF THE DEBATES. tion generally is, “why did not your they are not. The laws are such that Mr BLACKMAN I desire toine committee report annual sessions ?” we can live under them without all!.

a personal explanation in regard to And all through the term of this con- those amendments. And I believe if

some remarks I made some time since, vention, whenever I have visited my any person should think proper to set

which remarks will be found on page home, that has been the inquiry; they tle in the State of Michigan he would

355 of the debates. In the first line have said to me, “There must be be able to live under these laws as well

of the last column of that page the annual sessions of the Legislature.” as we can.

word “is” should have been “might Of course that will not control other That is not the cause why Michigan be," so that the sentence would read: gentlemen here; they will be governed is behind other States; it is not that we - it might be provided that the House by the voice of their own constituents, are not provided with sufficient legis- shall have the sole power of impeachand by their own views of propriety. lation. The gentleman speaks of the ment, and that the Senate shall try all I speak of it as illustrating what the looseness of our legislation. That, in impeachments," people of my part of the State desire my estimation, is not owing so much to I make this explanation now, because and expect. In the main, with but one the number of sessions that we have, as it is too late to correct the error in the

exception I think, the press, so far as I to the character of the Legislature. If proof-sheets. Without explanation, I : have observed it, without respect to we have annual sessions instead of bien- might be placed in rather an awkward

party at all, have expressed a desire for nial sessions, have we any guarantee position. In speaking in regard to the annual sessions of the Legislature. that the character of the Legislature article on “Impeachments and Remo. . But if it were not so, we are here to will be any better than it is now? It is vals from Office," I stated that it was provide in this organic law for the entirely owing to the character of the not absolutely necessary to have a sepfuture great and growing interests of Legislature, not to the number of ses- arate article upon that subject in our the State of Michigan. We are here, sions, that these things are so.

Constitution. As an illustration of my I trust, to remove somewhat the in- It is my opinion that the item of eighty position I cited the Constitution of the cubus which has been imposed upon thousand dollars is worth saving to the United States and the Constitution of this State by its former Constitutions, people to assist in paying the debt of some of the other States, where proand its former legislation. If we are Michigan. That seems to be considered vision on that subject was made in the not here for that purpose, if we are by some as a paltry amount not worth article on the Legislative Department. here merely to leave the State bound looking after; and yet it is these small. The sentence in which this error occurs and tied up as it has been heretofore, I amounts that make up the great aggre-l reads as printed as follows:

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" And in the Constitution of this state, section, so that it shall read “and on terests are to be injured by the elay, when speaking of tbe powers of the Senate | the sono

Senate the second Wednesday of January in I have not yet been told. and House of Representatives, it is provided

| In reference to the excellent and elothat the House shall have the sole power of every year thereafter, etc. impeachment, and that the Senate shall try Mr. BRADLEY. Before the ques- quent speech of the gentleman from all impeachments."

tion is taken upon this amendment, in St. Clair, (Mr. CONGER,) I desire to say It should read “it might be provi- order that I may vote intelligently, I that I think his facts go against his. ded that the House should have the desire to make some few inquiries or arguments. He says here that the sole power of impeachment, and that suggestions. I listened with a great State of Illinois is a progressive State, the Senate should try all impeach- deal of interest to the very eloquent and that the State of Wisconsin has ments.” I knew that such a provision debate of this morning. I have been gone far ahead of the State of Michiwas not in our present Constitution; I closely on the look-out for facts and gan, because, as I understand him to and it would have been, in my judg- arguments as presented by that debate, say, they had more frequent legislation ment, an inexcusable blunder to have in order, if possible, to be prepared to there. Now, the fact is, if I have read made such a statement. I therefore gratify some of my friends here by the history of the State of Illinois cordesire to make this correction in order voting for this amendment. The arena rectly, they have always the

voting for this amendment. The argu- rectly, they have always there depended that it may go upon the record.” ment in favor of thë amendment has upon biennial gessions. That has con

Mr. BURTCH. I rise merely to a generally been stated in something tributed to the great prosperity of the matter of inquiry or explanation as the like these words: « Owing to the State of Illinois; and why should not case may be. I find by reference to varied and great interests of our the same kind of legislation contribute page 215 of the debates, that I am re- State, and the constantly changing to the prosperity of the State of Michiported as offering a substitute for sec- condition of those interests, we need gan? There are other points which tion seven of the article on corporations legislation every year, instead of de- might be noticed; for my mind has not other than municipal. The substitute pending for our legislation upon bien- been satisfied with this kind of arguis there printed as follows:

nial sessions of the Legislature." That mentation. "Corporations and joint stock associations is simply a general statement of the We have been referred to the exa may hold any real estate hereafter acquired matter. If the friends of the amend-/ pense of holding biennial sessions of for the period of ten years, and until the Leg ment had gone on to substantiate that the Legislature. I apprehend that the islaturo shall pass a general law authorizing the confiscation of such real estate, unless

statement with a sufficient array of expense of the legislative term will be the same be actually occupied by such corpo- facts, then the argument to my mind about the same from one year to an. ration or joint stock association in the dis- would

would have been a conclusive one. other, whether we have annual or bis

have been a conclusive one charge of its franchises."

But a simple statement of what I ac-ennial sessions. You may reckon from · I apprehend that at that period of knowledge to be the truth, in regard sixty to a hundred thousand dollara the history of this Convention there was to the great interests of our State, does per year, as the expense if you have an a considerable disposition not to attach not prove that those interests are to be annual session, and about the same a great deal of importance to what I advanced by annual gessions of the for every two years, if the sessions did nere. I thik that at that time my Legislature. I inquire then, in regard shall only be biennial Because in rem head was too much deranged to have to some of these interests, our fisher-gard to the length of time consumed ever got off such a substitute as that. lies, our mines, our lumbering inter- from 1835 to 1850, the time occupied (Laughter.) I would like that some ests, and our interests generally, either in the annual session, was about as person who propagated that creature (in the southern or northei'n part of the long on the average as the time occuwould father it. (Renewed laughter.) State; how is it that they are so very pied in biennial sessions, from 1850 to LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. changeable, how is it that those inter- 1866. So that, on the score of econo

ests are undergoing changes every my, we can save money by having biMr. MUSSEY. I move that the

twelve months to such an extent, that ennial sessions. I am aware that makConvention now resolve itself into

(they require additional legislation for ing money as fast as we do, it matters committee of the whole upon the gen

| their protection and development? I very little whether we spend fifty or a eral order...

confess that I do not understand. The motion was agreed to.

hundred thousand dollars a year Yet nois resolved The gentleman from Calhoun (Mr. that may become an item worth looking itself into committee of the whole. WILLARD) referred to the necessity of after in the history of Michigan here(Mr. PRINGLE in the Chair,) and re-frequent legislation for the benefit of after. sumed the consideration of the article municipalities, referring, I suppose, to! If some of these difficulties could entitled “Legislative Department." :

charters of cities and villages, and of be solved in my mind I might be con

other corporations. Now, I can very verted to the principle of the amendSESSIONS OF THE LEGISLATURE. " readily conceive that cases may arise ment, and be prepared to vote for it. The CHAIRMAN. When the com- when cities would desire an extension But until I am able to get out of this mittee arose this forenoon, it had under of their charters, or an alteration of darkness of apprehension in regard to consideration section eight of this the law under which they are organ- the point and force of the arguments article, as follows:

ized, to such an extent as to enable which have been made here, I shall be SECTION 8. The Legislature shall meet at them to levy taxes for railroad pur- compelled to vote against th the seat of government, on the second poses, and the like of that. I can ment. · Wednesday of January, in the year one thou understand how it may be that some Mr. GIDDINGS I did not intend sand eight hundred and sixty-nine, and on the second Wednesday of January in every railroad Company going out from Lan- / to say one word upon this subiect: and I second year thereafter, and at no other time sing down to Battle Creek, and reach- I should not have done so if my colleague, or place, unless as provided in this Constitu- / ing on to Schoolcraft, etc., may want (Mr. BRADLEY.) had not taken the dotion. The time of meeting shall be at eleven o'clock in the forenoon; and the time of tinal W

final an opportunity to come to the Legis- sition that he has. I want to state one

OPPOrbundy 60 come to the legis adjournment shall be at twelve o'clock, noon. lature next winter. : There might be single reason which will induce me to

The pending question is upon the some little embarrassment, if they had vote for this amendment. That one motion of the gentleman from Berrien, I to wait twelve months longer before single reason, if there was no other (Mr. COOLIDGE,) to strike out the word they could get such legislation as they will be sufficient to induce me to give of second," where it last occurs in the think they need. But how those in that vote. That reason is, that in a

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