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TANY years have elapsed since we addressed the Public on ,

the Plan of the CRITICAL Review. Their uniform encouragement, amidst the specious promises of numerous and plausible pretenders, rendered it unneceffary; for, to repeat our professions was superfluous, and we enjoyed that encouragement and protection which it is often the defign of such addresses to follicit. We were always aware, that the existence of our Work was inseparably connected with our ardent, unremitting exer. tions. These have been continued amidst difficulties which will not occur to the inattentive enquirer, to those who do not reflect that a temperate praise seldom rises fo high as the wishes of many authors, and that very warm encomiums are often more injuri. ous than disapprobation. The flightest hint of difike, and what is more unpleasing, the necessity of sometimes condemning the work which the author has probably looked on with a partial eye, must render us subject to all the obloquy which disappointment can bestow.-But we must not be drawn afide from the object of this address, which is defigned to explain the reasons that have induced us to make some alteration in our plan.

Several circumstances concurred, at the commencement of our Review, which are now considerably varied. At that time the productions were fewer in number, and of less importance. The Foreign Intelligence was confined rather to works of entertainment than of utility; for our neighbours had not, then, made those advances in science which have enlightened a future period. On all these accounts, we were able to introduce a new source of entertainment; viz. works of art either undertaken or completed, without adding any additional burthen ; without the necessity of an Appendix. But when we perceived our increafing avocations, our first step was to omit that part of our plan which was not intimately connected with a literary Review. This gave us additional scope, and rendered our work more compact and uniform ; but we foon felt difficulties of the same kind.

At the conclusion of a tedious and perplexing war, when we renewed our connexions with the continent, which were for a A 2

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time necessarily interrupted, we found a different scene; for our accumulations were then become so numerous, that we could not, with common justice, fulfil our duty within the usual li. mits. Two methods were then suggested to our determination ; either to enlarge our common fize, or to add, what we had so often rejected, an additional Number to each Volume. The former is more eligible; for our readers would at once see the peceflity of the alteration, and be foon informed of the improvements of other nations. The latter is, however, most convenient ; because intelligence from the continent is seldom regular. Befides, the English publications must be our principal object: to them we must attend with the anxiety of parents ; with the attention dictated by the closeft connections. In foreign works, we cannot always decide on the style and manner ; we cannot enter on those minute details, which are so interesting in our

It seems most useful, in some measure, to unite both plans; the more important and temporary subjects may be given under the article of Foreign Intelligence, and be rather a connected view of general attempts, than a broken detail of particular performances. Yet this alone will not give an ade. quate idea of foreign literature, and in this department something must be added. On the continent, many memoirs are published in miscellaneous collections, which cannot be the subject of our attention in a separate form : many works are announced, which are both curious and useful. These we fhall collect in our cur. rent Numbers; and, while we are arranging our intelligence, we fhall shortly mention those publications, connected with the fub. ject, which our limits will not allow us to examine more particularly. On the whole, we hope to give an account which will be complete, though concise ; and useful, though not attended with the formal repetition of titles.

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The Appendix, at the end of each volume, will contain an ao count of those foreign works that are not of a temporary kind, and of those Englifh publications which were necessarily omitted in the current Numbers. This addition arises from causes so evi. dent and unavoidable, that we hope it will be favourably received, as we are confident it will appear, that the attempt is made only to render our Journal superior to every other in its ingenuity and candour; in the importance, novelty, and extent of its intelligence.

CON.

Cnued,

I

92

IOT

IIO

130, 360

HAMBERS's Dictionary, conti- Additions and 'Corrections to Dr. Ro.

bertson's History of Scotland, 87

Hunter's concise Account of Pegu, il Winter Evenings, or Lucubrations on

Dr. Girdleftone's Essays on the Hepa-,

Life and Letters,

88

titis,

14 Symmons's Sermons,

Kirwan's Essay on Phlogiston, 16 Philosophical Transactions of the Royal
Dr. Fordyce's Addresses to the Deity, 23 Society of London, Vol. LXXVII.
Bonnet's Interesting views of Christi- part I. 95.—Part II.

329
anity,

25 Dr. Moseley's Treatise of Tropical Dis.

Bonnet's Philosophical and Critical En- eases,

quiries concerning Christianity, ibid. A Concordance to Shakespeare, 107

Prestwich's Respublica,

29 Jephson's Julia : or the Italian Lover,

Barlow's Vision of Columbus, 31

Miln's Physico-Theological Lectures up- Parry's Life of Scipio Africanus, and of

on the State of the World, 35 Epaminondas,

113

Adam's Essays on the Microscope, 40 Introduction to the History of the Dutch

Knox's Tour through the Highlands of Republic,

119

Scotland,

46 Memoirs of the late War in Asia, 119

Headley's Select Beauties of Ancient Observations on various Passages of

English Poetry,

49 Scripture,

125

Nisbett's Attempt to illustrate various De Lúc's Idées, sur la Meteorologie,

Passages in the New Testament, 53

FOREIGN LITERARY INTELLIGENCE, Lettice's Two Sermons,

145

55, 135, 217, 299, 384, 465, 553 Parry's Sermun,

ibid.

Dr. Horley's Analogy between the Light Smith's Ordination Sermon, 146

of Inspiration and the Light of Learn- Whalley's Mont Blanc,

ibid.

ing,

67. Reflections on the common Version of

Berington's Essay on the Depravity of. the Scriptures, &c.

147

the Nation,

68 Derwent, an Ode,

ibid.

Foot's Plain Account of Baptism, ibid. Beloe's Poems and Tranflations, 148

Dr. Hodson's Jesus Christ the true God, The Controversiad,

149

ibid. Fatal Follies,

ibid.

Pædobaptism examined,

69 Retribution,

ibid.

Ecclesiastes. A new Translation, ibid. Agitation,

150

Bath waters, a conje&ural Idea of their The Effects of the Passions, ibid.

Nature and Qualities,

70 The West Indian,

ibid.

Charles's Effay on the Treatment of Adventures of Jonathan Corncob, ibid.

Consumptions,

72 Phoebe,

ibid.

Wilkes's Speeches in the House of Com- Animadversions on the Preface to Bel-

mons,

ibid. lendinus,

15!

Speech on the Impeachment of Cooper's Letters on the Slave Trade,

Mr. Hastings,

73

ibid.

Ramsay's Letter to James Tobin, Esq. 74 Supplement to Cooper's Letters, ibid.

The School for Fathers,

ibid. Newton's Thoughts on the Slave Trade,

Ela,

15%

Catharine,

ibid. Burke's Letter to Ph. Francis, Esq. 153

Augusta,

76 Miuutes of Warren Haftings and Philip

A free Translation of the Preface to Francis, Esqrs.

ibid.

Bellendenus,

ibid. Hastings's Answer to the Articles of Im.

The true Alarm!

ibid. peachment,

Memoirs of Maj. Edw. M'Gauran, 77 Pigott's Second Letter to the right hun.

The Conjurer Unmasked, ibid. William Pitt,

ibid.

Address to the Manufacturers and Tra- Defence of the Statute 43 Eliz. concern-

ders of Great Britain,

ibid. ing the Poor,

ibida

Bramah's Dissertation on Lucks, ibid. Thoughts on the Importar.ce of the man-
Nickolls's Letter on the Abolition of the ners of the Great to general Society, ibid.
Slave Trade.

ibid. Letter to the Capuc of the University of

Fawcett's Essay on Anger, 78 Cambridge,

155

Mrs. Inglefield's Justification, ibid. Bonhote's Parental Monitor, ibid.

Captain Inglefield's Vindication, ibid. Mortrou's Elements of Universal Hif-

Answer to Captain Inglefield's Vindi- tory,

156

cation,

ibid. The Children's Friend,

157

Correspondence, 79, 80. 160. 239, 240. Favourite Tales,

ibid.

327, 328, 572, 573. Fairy Tales,

ibid.

Whitaker's Maty Quecai of Scots vindi. D'Eérouville's Ground work of the

çated,

81 Granmas olche Ficach Language, ibid.

192

Salmon's System of the French Lan- Impartial Proceedingsrespecting the four

guage,

158 Regiments raising for Service in the

Murdoch's Pronunciation and Ortho-

East Indies,

233

graphy of the French Language, ren- Letters on the Politics of France, ibido
dered casy,

ibid. Sketch of the Conduct of the Commffion-

Midsummer Holydays,

ibid. ers for the Affairs of India, 234

The Contrast,

159 Elements of Medical Jurisprudence, ibid.

Short Account of the late Dr. Parsons, Brand's Case of a Boy, who had been

Dr. Saunders, Dr. Collignon, aud sir mistaken for a Girl,

ibid.

Alexander Dick,

ibid. Candid Review of Foot's Observations

Political Miscellanies,

ibid. on the new Opinions of J. Hunter, 235

Memoirs of Mr. Henry Masers de la Alan Fitzofborne,

ibid.

Tude,

ibid. History of Eleonora Meadowson, 236

Memoirs of H. Masers de Latude, 160 The Apparition, a Tale, ibid.
Archæologia. Vol. VIII. 161, 494 Sidney Place,

ibid.
Fourcroy's Elements of Natural History, Augusta,

237

and of Chemistry,

168 Mrs. Gooch's Appeal to the Public, ibid.

Historical Sketches of Civil Liberty, 171 Adams's Flowers of Ancient History,
Dr. Denman's Engravings to illustrate

ibid.
the Generation and Parturition of Flowers of Modern History, 238

Animals,

173 Richards’s Review of Noble's Memoirs

Rigby's Obfervations on Sugar, 175 of the House of Cromwell, ibid.
Mason's Edition of the Poems of w. Walbeck's Apologues, Allegories, &c.
Whitehead, Esq.
177

239

Dr. Swediaur's Obfervations on Vene- Laura, or Letters from Switzerland, ibid.

real Complaints,

183 Morsels of Criticism,

241, 507

Howard's Observations on the Venereal Pearson's Principles of Surgery, Part I.

Disease,

186

247

Letters and Papers on Agriculture, &c. Dr. St. John's Method of Chymical No-

Vol. III,

menclature,

251

The Athenaid. A Poem, 199 Piozzi's Letters to and from Dr. John-
Dr. Duncan's Medical Commentaries. fon,

258

Vol. XII.

201 Pharmacopæia Coll. Reg. Med. Lond.

Dr. Priestley's Defence of Unitarianism,

265

203 Dr. Kentish’s Essay on studying Natural

Holme's Four Tracts,

204

History,

273

The Twin Brothers,

207

-Essay on Sca-Bathing, 275

Cnote's Elements of the Grammar of Marshall's Rural Economy of Norfolk,

the English Language,

208

276

Cowley's Fate of Sparta,

213 Wilmer's Observations on Herniæ, 280

Love in the East,

215 Dr. Underwood's Surgical Tracts, 281

Abbey of Ambresbury,

224 Sir John Dalrymple’s Memoirs of Great

Jekyll : a Political Eclogue, ibid. Britain, &c. Vol. II.

Althan and Galvin, a Tale, 225 Life of Baron Frederic Trenck,

291

A Trip to Parnassus,

ibid. Memoirs of Baron Trenck

297

More's Slavery ; a Poem, 225 Reasons for revising our present Version

Propofal for the Confideration of those of the Bible,

311

who interest themselves in the Aboli- Evangelical Summary of corroborative

tion or Preservation of the Slave Trade, Testimonies concerning Jesus Christ,

ibid.

312

Mason's Discourse on the African Slave Turner's Appeal on the Modes of rais-

Trade,

227

ing Money for Improvement of Church

Dr. Priestley's Sermon on the same sub- Lands, &c.

ibid.

ject,

228 Dr. Priestley's Letters to Candidates for

Dr. Peckard's Sermon on the same sub- Orders,

ibid.

ject,

ibid. Defence of the rev. Arthur O'Leary, ibid.

A gutters's Sermon on the same sub- Griffies's Journey to Brighton,

313

ject.

Falconar's Poems,

ibid.

Hughes's Discourse on the same subject, Kerr's Minor Poems,

214

ibid. The Battle of Hastings,

ibid.

Hayter's Two Sermons at Whitehall, ib. Sketches of Beauty,

ibid.

Bishop of Gloucester’s Sermon besore the Yearsley's Poem on the Inhumanity of

Lords, Jan. 30,

230

the Slave Trade,

ibid.

Crabhe's Discourse after the Funeral of Puddicombe's Poeins to M:11. Ramsay,

the Duke of Rutland,

232

&c.

ibid.

De Lolme's Observations relating to the Mulligan's Poems on Slavery and Ope

Taxes upon Windows,

ibid. preslion,

315

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