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dent to me that the smelting process is the one for which they are best adapted.

There is no doubt that another year will witness important results of mining in this district.

Concerning the production of gold and silver in the Hualpai mining district, Mojave County, Arizona, for the year ending December 31, 1871, C. A. Luke reports as follows: There is one steam 5-stamp mill in the district, located at Silver Park, and owned by Meacham and Hardy. This mill is not fully completed, but will be soon.

The ores are at present shipped to San Francisco, and yield from $200 to $800 per ton. Over 100 tons have been shipped. One shipment of 20 tons yielded $800 per ton.

Exhibit of producing mines in Castle Dome mining district, Yuma County, Arizona, on the

1st day of January, 1872. Reported by George Tyng.

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Buckeye....

Butterfield Brog ... Lode. N. WXS. E 87 800 feet...
Flora Temple

Polhamus & Gunthor .do ....do 60 2,000 feet.
Castle Dome
Barney & Tyng. do

...do 87 100X15... Extension of Castle Dome ......do

do ...do 87 2, 000X 15. Don Santiago

......do

.do

..do 90 1, 600X4..

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Many other claims not worked. Deepest shaft in the district is on the Castle Dome mine—160 feet-showing much ore. Mexican laborers. Hoisting all done by hand-windlass. Whims, &c., to be erected from proceeds of ore now en route to San Francisco and Truckee. Freights from Colorado River near mines to San Francisco, $12.50, coin, per ton. Ore assays (in bulk) 50 per cent. to 65 per cent. Jead, 7 ounces to 182 ounces silver per ton. Galena-ores average 60 per cent. lead, 35 ounces silver, and sell for $60 coin, about.

The Castle Dome district has been organized since 1863; worked only by prospectors without capital until October, 1870. Not $300 invested January 1, 1872, in buildings or other permanent improvements. Parties now working are cautjous, and work no lodes that do not pay their way from the top down.

In the Castle Dome district and about Gila City mining has been carried on most of the time during the year. From the former locality the lead-ores are shipped to San Francisco, and at the latter the capacity of the stamp-mill for working the gold-ores is reported to have been increased. It is also reported that a stamp-mill is being erected by Mr. Booger, near La Paz, to work the ores from the Constantia, a vein wbich is described in my last report.

On the whole, the immediate prospects for mining in Arizona are more favorable at the close of 1871 than the year before.

CHAPTER VII.

NEW MEXICO. My limited means have not enabled me to visit this Territory during the year, or even to keep a paid agent there. For the information I have received from that quarter I am principally indebted to persous residing there, who take sufficient interest in the mining resources of the country to undertake the trouble of communicating information gratuitously. Among these, thanks are principally due to Mr. R. B. Willison, surveyor-general of the Territory, Dr. Hilgert, Messrs. M. Bloomfield, Eugene Goulding, and A. II. Morehead.

In the Moreno mines the placers have been worked with moderate success during most of the year, as will appear from the following statement. The Aztec mine has also been worked, and produced bullion. The Montezuma has only been prospected, and the mill has remained

idle:

Exhibit of producing mines in Moreno mining district, Colfax County, New Mexico, on

January 1, 1872. Reported by M. Bloomfield.

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REMARKS.-Aztec mine idle since October, on account of water in mine. Montezuma Mill idle; but twont

H. Ex. 211- -22

five or thirty miners at work the whole year developing a lead of 30 inches of quartz, wbich will probably pay from $15 to $20 per ton. Chester Mill ran several weeks in May and June, but failed to pay expenses

A company had been formed in January, 1872, to work the Moreno Creek by machinery, and it is thought that they will succeed beyond doubt. There are some five or six miles of good mining ground, which have been secured by this company, and which they will divide to run about three claims to the mile. The plan is to employ steam-shovels to dig and hoist the dirt; the dirt to be washed on the surface, or rather in sluices, rome 8 or 10 feet above the surface of the ground. This does away with the inconvenience occasioned by the slight grade of this creek, which is only about one in one hundred. The ground has heretofore been worked entirely by hand and wheelbarrows, a process which is expensive and slow.

This creek averages abont 50 cents or 15 grains of gold to the cubic yard. The company calculate the can work the ground for 25 cents the cubic yard, and work 40 yards per day. Their enterprise serras entirely practicable, and may be the means of increasing the production of gold by $300,000 per year. The general prospects of the district are good, owing to the heavy snows of last winter.

From Silver City I am informed that the district still suffers on account of a lack of capital invested in the mines. Still it is reported that about $90,000 worth of silver slabs have been shipped from there since the mines were discovered. Most of this was smelted out by Mexicans in their primitive way. No mills or smelting works are as yet erected. In July it was reported that about sixty miners were at work here taking out ore from the various silver-lodes. The Sophia lode, owned by the Spring Hill Mining Company, had a shaft 25 feet deep, and showing a splendid vein of rich ore. The vein is from 41 to 5 feet wide. The Reinhart lode, owned by Mr. William Kronig and others, was 8 feet wide at a depth of 16 feet, and very rich ore. The Colfax lode showed 3 feet of good ore at 10 feet in depth. The Great Eastern lode, owned by the Eureka Mining Company, showed a splendid vein of rich ore 4 feet wide. The Abbey lode, and a great many others, showed also good ore.

There has been a great drawback on these mines by reason of the miners being compelled to lie idle on account of not even having proper tools to work with. As a general thing they came to the district without means. In January, 1872, there were over three hundred lodes located, some of which have shafts on them of the depth of 60 feet.

It is asserted that none of the lodes, by practical tests, produce less than $50 to the ton. The area covered by these silver-lodes is about thirty miles square, and it is believed that these mines will, at some day, whenever capital comes to the country, prove far richer than is now supposed.

From Pinos Altos I have no reliable data as yet, beyond a general estimate of the product, which has been small.

There has been some activity again in the Organ Mountains during the year, but lack of capital is here also in the way of a speedy development of the mines.

Exhibit of producing mines in Organ mining district, Doña Ana County, New Mexico, on

January 1, 1872. Reported by A. H. Morehead.

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Exhibit of producing mines in Organ mining district, 8C.—Continued.

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Aztec......

$4, COO

of gold.

Stepbenson

6,000

Cuebas

Lead......

Not worked.

J. Freudenthal, H. Lead, anti. Silver, small $325 Furnace.
Lesinsky, A. H. More.

mony.

per cent.
head, F. Blake, et al.
H. Lesinsky, W. F. Quartz, lead Silver .....

340 ...do
Shedd, et al.
J. Freudenthal, G. E.

Lead...... $18, silver ...do
Blake, et al.

and lead.
N. V. Bennett, Shedd, Lead, &c .. Silver.

et al.
W. H. Graham, James

Foley et al.
M. Lesinsky, Joseph Iron, anti Silver.....
Lesinsky, et al.

Bennett.

New discovery.

El Quibedo

Lead ....

Do.

Rosalia

Do.

mony.

REMARKS.- The Stephenson is the oldest mine, having been discovered about thirty years ago, and worked successfully for about twenty years. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion in 1861 labor was suspended, and since that time but little bas been done. Work will begiu again shortly, and every indication shows that it will prove remunerative to the owners. There have a great many new discoveries been made within the past eix months, but I am unable to give ihe names of the mines, &c. The locations, however, are in the Organ district. The bullion produced has been extracted by the crude Mexican method. There are no regu. lar smelting-works or mills.

CHAPTER VIII.

COLORADO.

Want of funds has compelled me to investigate the progress which the mining industry of this Territory has undoubtedly made during 1871, with less detailed care than was my intention. Although the principal mining districts of Colorado are not included in the field allotted to me by congressional resolution, I have so far managed every year to record the developments made; and the processes used for the extraction of the precious metals have received their due share of attention. This last year my attention was necessarily directed to other fields which had not before been personally visited by me, and in using the greater part of the small amount appropriated by Congress for my work, in that direction, only enough has remained in my hands to furnish in this report a general outline of what has been accomplished during the year in Colorado.

As in former years, Messrs. Jacob F. L. Schirmer, assayer of the United States branch-mint at Denver, and J. H. Jones, agent of Wells, Fargo & Co., have kindly furnished me with an estimate of the product of Colorado for 1871. Their intimate acquaintance with the mining industry of the Territory, and their knowledge of the shipments made, entitle this estimate to the highest confidence, and I accept it, therefore, as my own:

Gold and silver product of Colorado Territory during 1871,

Shipped by express.
In private hands, (estimated)
Shipment in matte
Shipment of ore
From southern mines..
From northern mines..
Used by manufacturers

$2, 820,000

140,000 923,000 500,000 130,000

50,000 100,000

Total...

4,663,000

The most accurate estimate which I could obtain of the product of the previous year gave the yield of the whole Territory for that year as $3,675,000. There is therefore an increase of very nearly a million of dollars.

This increase has been apparent on every side during the last year throughout the Territory in more extended mining, milling, and smelting operations; and it is clear that the industry is now looked upon as legitimate business more than ever before. The time of wild and extravagant speculation, with undeveloped properties and processes," has passed away in Colorado, and if all the signs do not deceive me, an era of steadily progressive industry has at last fairly been inaugurated.

In Gilpin County many of the older claims, which had been idle for several years, have been taken up again. It is noteworthy that the larger number of these have been leased by miners, who in almost every instance have made good wages, and in some cases small fortunes. They

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