Gambar halaman
PDF
ePub

The Edition of this Volume XIII. of AMERICAN BOOKPrices CURRENT is limited to Six Hundred and

Seventy Copies.

AMERICAN

BOOK-PRICES CURRENT

А

RECORD OF BOOKS, MANUSCRIPTS, AND AUTOGRAPHS
SOLD AT AUCTION IN NEW YORK, BOSTON AND
PHILADELPHIA, FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1906
TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1907, WITH

THE PRICES REALIZED

COMPILED FROM THE AUCTIONEERS' CATALOGUES

BY

LUTHER S. LIVINGSTON

NEW YORK

DODD, MEAD AND COMPANY

1907

A

Ref

603.7

HARVARD COOLBRARY
FROM THc L P., Y OF
ERNEST LEVIN GAY

JUNE 15, 1927

Copyright, 1907,
BY DODD, MEAD AND COMPANY

PREFACE

T

1

HE Auction Season of 1906-1907, the results of which are

reported in the following pages, has not been a notable

one, either for the character and number of its sales, or with a few exceptions, for especially rare items which have been offered. Very few of the libraries offered included many of the higher class of collector's books. The best collection of this character, which a glance over the season's catalogues shows, was that formed by Mr. Louis M. Dillman, of Chicago, and which was sold by The Anderson Auction Company on March 21st, afternoon and evening. Mr. Dillman had primarily collected first editions of Nineteenth Century English authors, though he had also acquired a few rare items of earlier date, besides many limited editions and special books in other classes. The books were mostly in choice collector's condition. His copy of Browning's first book, “ Pauline; a Fragment of a Confession,” 1833, appeared for the fourth time in an American salesroom. It came up first in the George T. Maxwell sale at Libbie's, in April, 1895, and brought $260.00, and was later acquired by A. J. Morgan. Its next appearance in the auction room was at Bangs', in April, 1902, where it brought $720.00 and was acquired by William Appleton. At the Appleton sale a year later, May, 1903, it brought $1025.00. Competition seemed to be lacking at the Dillman sale as our record shows it brought $810.00 only.

The copy of Keat's “ Poems," 1817, which he gave to the Misses Reynolds, brought $900.00. Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare," in the original boards, uncut (though the two volumes were not quite uniform) brought $800.00. Shelley's “Queen Mab,” 1813, a very fine copy in the original boards, uncut, brought $650.00. Other important records at the same sale will be found in their proper places in the following pages.

$2900.00 was the largest sum paid for a single printed book during the year. This was a small and thin octavo, Samuel de Champlain's first publication Les Sauvages,” licensed in 1603 and published late in that year, or early in 1604. This was sold

vii

[ocr errors]

by The Merwin-Clayton Sales Co., on Feb. 26th. The copy was "picked up on one of the quays of Paris a little more than a year ago for twenty centimes (four cents).

Three additional parts, (Nos. III, IV and V) of the library of Wilberforce Eames were sold during the season by The Anderson Auction Company; through whom were also dispersed the libraries of Elliot Coues, the ornithologist, Albert E. Jack (containing first editions of Tennyson), Henry A. Muhlenberg, R. J. Pick, and Judge C. H. Van Brunt, as well as a large number of less important collections. At their sale of the John D. Crimmins collection of Autographs in two sessions on Apr. 8th, many documents brought high prices. The libraries of George M. Elwood, Gen. Louis Palma di Cesnola, Richard B. Sinton, and Dr. Ottocar E. Kopetschny, were among the more important collections dispersed by The Merwin-Clayton Sales Company. Of the Kopetschny library, eight catalogues were issued, besides a ninth catalogue of autographs.

C. F. Libbie & Company's sales have as usual included numerous important volumes. The libraries of F. Griswold Tefft, E. H. Capen, J. M. Rice, a selection from that of James Terry, of Hartford, the Napoleon collection of A. D. S. Bell, and remainders of the libraries of Samuel G. Drake and Samuel Adams Drake were some of their sales.

The two portions of the Pennypacker Library (Parts III and IV) sold by Mr. Henkels, contained the best Americana offered during the year. Part III, sold Dec. 5th and 6th, especially, was rich in Pennsylvania rarities; Part IV. sold Apr. 24th and 25th included American Revolutionary History. The highest price of the year was realized at Mr. Henkels' Autograph sale of Feb. 22d and 23d, when $4300.00 was paid for two interleaved pocket almanacs, containing diaries kept by George Washington.

The 1887 catalogues, from which selections have been made, represent 448 sessions, and aggregate more than 121,000 lots. Of these 12,700 lots have been recorded in the present volume.

L. S. L.

October, 1907

« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »