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And also that Mr. Wright may be furnished with certified copies of the original papers should he make request for them, in conformity to the terms of the vote passed by the Commission. I am, &c.,

GEO. S. BOUTWELL,

Counsel for the United States.

No. 64.

Mr. Boutwell to Mr. Evarts.

FRENCH AND AMERICAN CLAIMS COMMISSION,

1518 H STREET,

Washington, February 24, 1881. SIR: I have the honor herewith to submit a statement of the exponditures arising in the execution of the treaty between the United States and France, bearing date January 15, 1880, and chargeable to the appropriation made by the act of June 16, 1880, as follows: 1. Rent of office for the Commission

$2,400 00 2. Salary of the commisionsers .

12,000 00 3. Salary of the counsel and agent for the United States ..

5, 000 00 4. Salary of the assistant counsel for the United States.

3, 500 00 5. Salary of the secretary of the United States 6. Salary of the stenographers to the counsel for the United States. 1, 800 00 7. Salary of the clerk to the secretary for the United States. ...

1, 500 00 8. General disbursements for the quar'ers ending December 31, 1880 (in

cluding pay of two messengers, furniture for offices, printing, station-
ery, fuel, &c.)....

1,595 02 Total ......

30, 795 02 There are now in the employment of the Commission, on the part of the United States, a special agent and an attorney, the latter receiving $100 a week and the former $6 per day and their necessary traveling expenses.

The attorney is engaged in taking testimony in Louisiana, and the special agent is occupied in investigating the character of the claim. ants and the nature of the claims.

By order of the Commission, proposals were sent to the principal printing establishments in this city for terms, &c., and the contract for printing was awarded to the Messrs. Gibson Brothers, at the rate of 90 cents per printed page for fifty copies of memorials, pleadings, tes. timony, &c.

Memorials have been filed in one hundred and sixty cases, covering claims aggregating about three million dollars.

It is impossible to estimate the expenses of the Commission, as the cost of printing, the expense of attorneys who may be employed to take depositions in different parts of the United States, and very likely in other countries, cannot now be foreseen.

By the tenth article of the treaty the Government of France will be called upon to reimburse the Government of the United States to the extent of one-half the expenses of the Commission that are common to both Governments, such as rent, office expenses, &c., and by the same article the whole expenses of the Commission, including contingent expenses, will be defrayed by a ratable reduction on the amount of the soms awarded by the Commissioners, to the extent of 5 per cent. on

the suns so awarded. Should there be any excess in expenses over the 5 per cent. it will be defrayed jointly by the two Governments.

In the estimate of expenses herewith submitted the item of $12,000, salary of commissioners, is only half the total amount paid, and is to be borne exclusively by the Government of the United States.

It is the opinion of those who have the best means of information that not less than six hundred claims will be filed, and in most of these testimony will be taken. This testimony will all be printed, together with the memorials, pleadings, and briefs, as prepared by the consul for the respective Governments. Very respectfully,

GEO. S. BOUTWELL,

Counsel for the United States.

No. 65.

Mr. Boutrell to Mr. Evarts.

FRENCH AND AMERICAN CLAIMS COMMISSION,

1518 H STREET,

Washington, February 25, 1881. SIR: I have to-day had an iuterview with four members of the House Committee on Appropriations, and they assure me that there will be no objection on the part of the committee to an appropriation of $150,000 for the support of the French and American Claims Commission for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1881, but they suggest that, inasmuch as the sundry civil bill is now in Committee of the Whole House, the amendment for that purpose be made in the Senate.

I called also upon Senator Davis, of West Virginia, chairman of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, and Senator Windom of the same committee, and left with the latter a copy of the letter of the 24th instant which I had the honor to address to you. Mr. Windom said that if the Secretary of State would write a letter to the chairman of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, asking for an appropriation of $150,000, the amendment would be inserted in the bill when it was under consideration by the committee. Yours, very respectfully,

GEO. S. BOUTWELL,

Counsel for the United States.

No. 66.

Mr. Boutwell to Mr. Blaine.

FRENCH AND AMERICAN CLAIMS COMMISSION,

1518 H STREET,

Washington, March 8, 1881. SIR: Agreeably to the vote of this Commission and in conformity to the letter of the Secretary of State bearing date the 19th of Febrnary, I have the honor to request that you will ask the Secretary of War to allow A. St. C. Denver, esq., to examine the records of the War De

H. Ex. 235-18

partment in reference to the action taken by the military authorities at New Orleans in regard to certain property known as the Lecompte stables, &c., Nos. 112 and 114 North Rampart street, New Orleans, said to bave been occupied by the United States military authorities from November 1, 1862, to August 1, 1863.

This application is based upon a memorial signed by Louise Sadour, now pending before the French and American Claims Commission. I have, &c.,

GEO. S. BOUTWELL,

Counsel for the United States.

No. 67.

Mr. Boutrell to Mr. Blaine.

Washington, March 10, 1881. (Received March 14.) Sir: At the request of John Mullan, esq., of this city, I have the honor to ask in his behalf that he may be permitted to examine certain papers which he thinks important in the prosecution of a cause before the French and American Claims Commission, against the French Gov. ernment, in the behalf of one Jacob Miltz, and to obtain certified copies of any of said papers. The papers to which reference is made are as follows:

1. History of the case and data as to the destruction of certain property in Paris, in March, 1871, owned by Jacob Miltz.

2. Certificate of citizenship and passport of said Miltz.

3. Correspondence of Milta, Pinchard, et al. in regard thereto, and reply of Assistant Secretary of State, Mr. Hay, July 20, 1880, to Dr. Pinchard.

4. Letters of administration on said Miltz's estate.

5. Inventory of goods destroyed deposited by Dr. Pinchard July 18, 1880.

6. Correspondence with the French Government in regard thereto. (Exact date not given.)

7. Other papers relating thereto of material value to the Commission, &c., which were filed on May 1, 1876, and on dates subsequently up to July 18, 1880. I bave, &c.,

GEO, S. BOUTWELL, Agent and Counsel for the United States.

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FRENCH AND AMERICAN CLAIMS COMMISSION,

1518 H STREET,

Washington, March 10, 1881. SIR: I have information that there are papers in the War Department which relate to the rights of claimants before the French and American Claims Commission under the treaty of January 15, 1880, which the agent and counsel for the United States Government and the claimants may have occasion to examine. I have, therefore, the honor

to request that such measures as are proper may be taken to obtain from the War Department the custody of such papers by the State Department, or an opportunity for the examination of them by parties interested. I have, &c.,

GEO, S. BOUTWELL,

Counsel for the United States.

No. 69.

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Boutwell.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 19, 1881. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th instant, requesting that such measures as are proper may be taken to obtain from the War Department the custody, by the State Department, of papers relating to claims under the French and Americau Claims Con vention, of January 15, 1880, or an opportunity for the examination of them by parties interested.

In reply, I have to inform you that your request having been duly communicated to the War Department, I am now in the receipt of a letter, dated the 16th instant, from the Secretary of War, in which he says that it will not be practicable to comply with your request, owing to the fact that there is no record or docket of claims in which French citizens are separately recorded as the parties in interest ; that claims growing out of the war of the rebellion have been filed during the last fifteen or twenty years, and that in order to comply with your request it would be necessary to search over the files of those years to determine whether the claimant is a French citizen or not.

The Secretary of War therefore suggests that the only practicable course seems to be that which was pursued by the British and American and the United States and Mexican Claims Commissioners, to wit, that the Department of State, at your instance, call upon the War Department for information or papers in specific cases, as they may be presented before the Commission, giving the names of the claimants in each case.

I will, therefore, thank you, in all cases hereafter in which information is desired from the War Department, to furnish the name of the clamant, and such other data as may be attainable, when application will be promptly made by this Department to the Secretary of War for certified copies of papers which may be on file in that Department relating to the specific cases as they may be presented. I am, &c.,

JAMES G. BLAINE.

No. 70.

Mr. Boutwell to Mr. Blaine.

WASHINGTON, April 13, 1881. (Received April 14.) SIR: I have the honor to call your attention to the inclosed translation of a communication made to me under date of the 22d of March, 1881, by Mr. Paul Déjardin, the agent of the French Government in

matters pending before the Freuch and American Claims Commission. The occasion of the communicatiou was the presentation by me, as agent and counsel for the United States before the Commission of the memorial of David Piaggo for the loss of property at or near the city of Matamoros, Mexico, by the acts of the armies of France during the occupation of Mexico by Maximilian.

By the first article of the convention between the United States of America and the French Republic, concluded January 15, 1880, it is stipulated that the claims of citizens of the United States, of the character specified in the article, who have suffered from acts committed against their persons or property "upon the high seas or within the territory of France, its colonies and dependencies, during the late war between France and Mexico," shall be referred to this Commission.

I have felt that it was inconsistent with the proper discharge of my duty as agent and counsel for the United States to decide that the parts of Mexico occupied by the armies of France during the late war between France and Mexico, were not dependencies of France, and, acting upon that opinion, I presented the claim of Piaggo to the Commission.

The communication of the agent of the French Government referred to assumes that by diplomatic arrangement or understanding, or by the letter and spirit of the treaty, such claims are inadınissible.

I now have the honor to solicit your instructions as to the course I am to pursue in the premises. With great respect, &c.,

GEORGE, S. BOUTWELL, Counsel, &c., for the United States.

Mr. Déjardin to Mr. Boutwell.

WASHINGTON, March 22, 1884. To the Agent, fc.:

The claim of David Piaggo, No. 2, against the French Republic, is based upon facts which occurred at Matamoros. Matamoros never having been comprised with French territory, its colonies and dependencies, I believe that you will admit with me that this claim is contrary to the letter and spirit of the treaty, and should nover have been presented to the Commission.

In conformity with the text of the convention, and by virtue of the instructions which have been given to him, the French agent has always taken scrupulous care to exclude claims founded either upon loss or emancipation of slaves, or upon acts of war which were to be imputed to the confederates.

Convinced that yon are animated by the same spirit, I ask you, Mr. Agent, to withdraw the claim of Peter Piaggo. Accept, &c.,

PAUL DÉJARDIN.

No. 71.

Mr. Blaine to Mr. Boutuell.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 20, 1881. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 13th instant, inclosing a copy of a communication of the 22d ultimo, addressed to you by Mr. Paul Déjardin, relative to a claim of David Piaggo, No. 2, against the French Republic.

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