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that Mr. Pinkney, being in a diplomatic character, will be permitted to proceed on his journey there without the sanction of a passport; should it be necessary, he requests that Mr. Fox will be so good as to send him one.

From Mr. Fox. Stable Yard, June 22, 1806. MR. Fox presents his compliments to Mr. Monroe, and will be very glad to see him here to-morrow at 12 o'clock.

Mr. Fox is very much obliged to Mr. Monroe for his note informing him of Mr. Pinkney's arrival. He ima gines that no passport is necessary for that gentleman to proceed to London. The order respecting his baggage and effects shall immediately be expedited.

To Mr. Fox. Low Layton, June 23, 1806.

MR. MONROE presents his compliments to Mr. Fox, and regrets that he had not the pleasure of receiving his note of yesterday till so late an hour this day, as to render it impossible for him to comply with his obliging invitation. The hour appointed for him to call in Stable Yard had not only passed, but he concluded that before he could arrive in Downing street, Mr. Fox would have left it and gone to the house of commons. Mr. Monroe will be happy to wait on Mr. Fox at any other time which may be convenient to him.

Mr. Monroe expects Mr. Pinkney in town to-night. As soon as he arrives, he will have the pleasure to inform Mr. Fox of it, and to request the appointment of an hour when he may have the honour of presenting him to Mr. Fox.

To Mr. Fox. Low Layton, June 25, 1806.

MR. MONROE presents his compliments to Mr. Fox, and has the honour to inform him of the arrival of Mr. Pinkney in the character of a joint commissioner extraordinary and plenipotentiary from the United States to his Britannick majesty. Mr. Monroe requests that Mr. Fox will be so good as to appoint a time when he may have the

honour of presenting Mr. Pinkney to him. He will avail himself of the same opportunity to deliver to Mr. Fox a copy of their joint letters of credence.

From Sir Francis Vincent. Stable Yard, June 27, 1806.

DEAR SIR, Mr. Fox has been, and indeed still continues so unwell with severe rheumatism, that it is not in his power as yet to fix a day to have the honour of seeing you and Mr. Pinkney, which I assure you he is very anxious and impatient to do; but as soon as he is able I shall have the honour of informing you. In the mean time Mr. Fox hopes you will have the goodness to excuse this unavoidable delay.

Mr. Fox requests that you will offer Mr. Pinkney his best compliments on his safe arrival. May I request that you would do me the honour to offer mine also?

Believe me, dear sir, your very faithful humble servant, F. VINCENT.

To Sir Francis Vincent. Low Layton, June 27, 1806. DEAR SIR,-It is with extreme regret that I heard yesterday of the indisposition of Mr. Fox, and I beg you to be assured, that I would on no consideration whatever hasten our interview at the expense of his quiet. I shall explain the cause of the delay to Mr. Pinkney, who will, I am satisfied, unite with me in this sentiment. I sincerely hope that his recovery will be rapid, and that I shall soon have the pleasure of seeing him in good health. Accept my acknowledgment for the very obliging expressions contained in your favour of this date, and believe me to be, with great consideration and esteem, very truly, your most obedient servant,

JAMES MONROE.

From Mr. Fox. Stable Yard, July 15.

MR. Fox presents his compliments to Mr. Monroe, and begs to have the honour of seeing him here with Mr. Pinkney, at 3 o'clock to-day.

From Sir Francis Vincent. Arlington Street, Tuesday Evening, July 15.

MY DEAR SIR,The king does not come to town till Monday, on which day you and Mr. Pinkney may certainly be presented to his majesty.

Yours ever, and most sincerely,

James Monroe, Esq. &c. &c.

F. VINCENT.

From Lord Holland. Sunday Night, July 20.

DEAR SIR,-Lord Howick, whom I have seen, will be very happy to be of any use to you, but is not the person who can officially present you, on producing your credentials. If you wish to settle the business through him, he will be ready to receive you any time before 12, at the admiralty. Since I saw him, I have written to lord Spencer, who is the regular person on such an occasion to supply my uncle's place, and though my letter went late this night, I hope his answer to it will find you as soon as this. I am sure if time allows, he will be happy to receive Mr. Pinkney and yourself, and present you in form to the king.

My uncle begged me to express his regret at having disappointed Mr. Pinkney and yourself, and feeling his health uncertain, was almost afraid of again fixing an hour; but as you will be in that part of the town, and his best hour is from four to five or thereabouts, perhaps Mr. Pinkney and you will be so good as to call about that time at Stable Yard.

Believe me, dear sir, ever your obliged,

HOLLAND.

P. S. If you settle to go to court with lord Spencer, have the goodness to inform lord Howick by a line, as he will otherwise wait for your commands, till past 12 o'clock.

James Monroe, Esq. &c. &c. &c.

From Lord Spencer. St. James's Place, July 21, 1806. LORD SPENCER presents his compliments Mr. Monroe, and has the honour to inform him, by desire of Mr. Fox, who is too much indisposed to have it in his power to receive him and Mr. Pinkney this morning, that the king will be at the queen's house to-day, at two o'clock, when, if it will be convenient for Mr. Monroe and Mr. Pinkney to attend, lord Spencer will be very happy to have the honour of introducing Mr. Pinkney to his majesty, for the purpose of delivering his credentials from the United States; and if Mr. Monroe and Mr. Pinkney are desirous of seeing lord Spencer before they go to the queen's house,. he will be at his office at Whitehall, at one o'clock, where, if they would have the goodness to call, he will have the honour of receiving them.

To Lord Spencer. Portland Place, July 21, 1806. MR. MONROE presents his compliments to lord Spencer, and begs to inform his lordship, that Mr. Pinkney and himself will have the honour to wait on him at Whitehall, at one o'clock, at which hour his lordship has been so good as to intimate, that he will be prepared, to receive them. Mr. Monroe very much regrets the indisposition of Mr. Fox, but Mr. Pinkney and himself will avail themselves. with pleasure of his lordship's obliging offer, to do them the honour of presenting them to his majesty to-day at two o'clock. Although Mr. Monroe is already an accredited minister at this court, yet as he is invested with a new character, being included in the special mission from the United States, he presumes that it will be proper, that he should also have the honour of being presented to his majesty as a party to it. Mr. Pinkncy and Mr. Monroe will have the honour of delivering to lord Spencer, a copy of their joint letter of credence at one o'clock.

To Lord Howick. Portland Place, July 21, 1806. MR. MONROE presents his compliments to lord Howick, and begs to assure his lordship, that he is very sensible of

his obliging attention in offering, as he is just informed by lord Holland, his good offices to procure Mr. Pinkney and himself the honour of being presented to his majesty to-day, which has been hitherto delayed by the much lamented indisposition of Mr. Fox. Mr. Monroe has the honour to inform lord Howick, that he has just received a letter from lord Spencer, intimating that his lordship will do Mr. Pinkney and himself the honour of presenting them to his majesty to-day. He hastens to give lord Howick this information, in consequence of a suggestion from lord Holland, that lord Howick would be so good as to remain at home till twelve o'clock, for the purpose of receiving them.

From Sir Francis Vincent. Stable Yard, July 21, 1806.

MY DEAR SIR,—I am very sorry to be under the necessity of asking you and Mr. Pinkney, whether you should consider it as of great inconvenience to postpone your presentation to the king till his next coming to town, which will be early next week, as it has not yet been in Mr. Fox's power to announce it officially to his majesty. In the mean time every communication from you and Mr. Pinkney will meet with the same attention as if this ceremony had been gone through; an attention which it will always be the pride of the foreign office to shew to the ministers of the United States, our half countrymen.

And from this delay no detriment will arise to the great cause, as I fear some days must yet elapse before Mr. Fox will be well enough to discuss business; he is, however, better. Pray write me a line in answer to this. I have not written to Mr. Pinkney will you make my ex cuse to him, as I am anxious for your getting this soon. Believe me, dear sir, most truly yours,

James Monroe, Esq. &c. &c. &c.

F. VINCENT.

NOTE. On Friday the 11th, Sir Francis Vincent promised us an interview with Mr. Fox on the 15th, which Mr. Fox invited by his note of that date. We attended at Mr. Fox's house according to appointment, but did not see him, bis health not permitting it. On the evening of the

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