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6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22d 23d 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32d

-Frank A. Lyon, Hillsdale.
-Edwin A. Blakeslee, Galien.
-James W. Humphrey, Wayland.
-Addison M. Brown, Schoolcraft.

Charles A. Ward, Ann Arbor.
-George W. Moore, Port Huron.
-George B. Davis, Utica.

-Ira T. Sayre, Flushing.
- Charles B. Collingwood, Lansing.
-William W. Potter, Hastings.

Robert B. Loomis, Grand Rapids.
-Robert D. Graham, Grand Rapids.
- Edgar S. Wagar, Edmore.
-Charles W. Giddings, St. Louis.

Matthew D. Wagner, Sand Beach,
-Theron W. Atwood, Caro.
-John Leidlein, Saginaw.
-Suel A. Sheldon, Berlin.

-Perley C. Heald, Midland.
-W. Irving Latimer, Big Rapids.

James K. Flood, Hart.
-James W. Milliken, Traverse City.
-Alvah G. Smith, Lake City.
-Daniel P. McMullen, Cheboygan.
-Fred K. Baker, Menominee.
-Alexander Maitland, Negaunee.
-Charles Smith, South Lake Linden.

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I, Justus S. Stearns, Secretary of State of the State of Michigan, do hereby certify that I have compared the annexed and foregoing list of all the Senators elect of the Senate of the State of Michigan, for the years 1899 and 1900, with the original returns, as transmitted to me by the clerks of the various counties of the State, and that it is a true and correct list.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of Michigan, at Lansing, this third day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine. [Seal.]

J. S. STEARNS,

Secretary of State.

All the Senators elect being present, came forward, took and subscribed the constitutional oath of office, and entered upon the discharge of their duties as Senators.

The Secretary then called the roll, and a quorum of the Senate was found to be present.

The President then addressed the Senate as follows:

Gentlemen of the Senate-It is with pleasure that I congratulate you upon your election to this distinguished and important body, which has so much influence over the future condition of our State and its people.

Here you are expected to make a good record for yourselves, strive for the best interests of your constituents, and guard the welfare of the State.

I wish to remind one portion of this Senate that they were nominated by conventions, which endorsed the State platform of the Republican party. The election, which gave so many of you overwhelming majori. ties, also bound you to stand by the endorsements of your constituents, and to carry out the legislation promised to the people of the State in your platform.

I maintain that our honesty as American citizens, and our integrity as members of a great political party, will not permit us to disregard our pledges to the people, and to over-ride the trust and confidence which has been placed in us. I ask that all such legislation receive your sincere and worthy consideration.

I heartily desire the co-operation of each and every Senator in conduct. ing the business which from time to time will be presented for your consideration. I feel sure that this body will work faithfully upon all matters submitted to it with reasonable despatch, that they will cheerfully remain in session any length of time sufficient to fully and carefully complete all legislation which is necessary and helpful for the good of our State.

I wish, briefly, to refer to our numerous and important State institutions, which are more or less under your care. May they receive your careful attention. And, furthermore, I ask that the several commissions and departments, which are of vital importance to the industries and well-being of our State, receive the benefit of your intelligent considers. tion.

I shall endeavor to accord to the gentlemen who represent the minor. ity all the respect and consideration which their rights and privileges demand You, too, are here by the will of the people, and I believe it is the spirit of this Senate to give your requests and opinions the benefit of fair treatment, which should always be given the minority.

I hope sincerely that the social as well as the political relations between all of us during this session will be most friendly. Both in heated debate upon the floor, and in outside conversation, let us remember that a spirit of good-feeling and courtesy will enable us to do our work and serve our State in the best possible manner. What experience I have had, limited as it may be, is at your service. I shall devote myself to the

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best of my ability, to serve our State, and my mistakes, many as they may be, will not be willful mistakes of the heart.

I anticipate a harmonious session, and I feel sure that the work done by you will be such that it will be appreciated by the people, and also productive of results that in future you can look upon with pride.

In conclusion, I hope our relations will be friendly, our co-operation sincere, and when we leave the Legislature of 1899 we can feel sure that we have been faithful servants of a great State.

Gentlemen, I thank you. What is your pleasure?

Mr. Blakeslee moved that the Senate proceed to the election of officers of the Senate;

Which motion prevailed.

The election of Secretary was then proceeded with, and the roll being called the Senators voted as follows:

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The President announced tbat Charles 8. Pierce, having received all of the votes cast, was duly elected Secretary of the Senate.

The election of Sergeant- at Arms was then proceeded with, and the roll being called, the Senators voted as follows:

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS.

FOR MOSES PARSHELSKY.

Mr. Atwood

Baker

YEAS.
Mr. Humphrey

Latimer

Mr. Perren

Potter

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The President announced that Moses Parshelsky having received all of the votes cast, was duly elected Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate.

The election of First Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms was then proceeded with, and the roll being called, the Senators voted as follows:

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The President announced that Hezekiah Sweet having received all of the votes cast, was duly elected First Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms of the

Senate.

The election of Second Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms was then proceeded with, and the roll being called, the Senators voted as follows:

SECOND ASSISTANT SERGEANT-AT-ARMS.

JOHN HILL.

Mr. Atwood

Baker

YEAS.
Mr. Humphrey

Latimer

Mr. Perren

Potter

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The President announced that John Hill, having received all of the votes cast, was duly elected Second Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate.

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS.

Mr. Wagner offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That the Sergeant-at-Arms be and he is hereby instructed to furnish the usual supply of mineral water for the use of the Senate;

Which resolution was adopted.

Mr. Sheldon offered the following resolution:

Resolved, that the Sergeant-at-Arms be and he is hereby authorized and empowered to appoint a messenger;

Which resolution was adopted.

Mr. Latimer offered the following resolution:

Resolved (the House concurring), That the legislative postoffice be kept open every week day from 8 o'clock a. m. to 8 o'clock p. m., and on each Sunday from 12 o'clock noon until 1 o'clock p. m., and that the mail be delivered to the Lansing postoffice in time for the outgoing trains on Sunday evenings;

Which resolution was adopted.

Mr. Flood offered the following resolution:

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