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BILLS, &C.

185

No. 11.

Flour. Wheat. Rye. Corn.

nine hundred pounds.
from am 1 Chamberlain
Forty five bushells of wheat

TALBOT COUNTY, to wit:

I hereby certify, that I have taken into my possession, in virtue of an act of assembly, entitled An act for the immediate supply of flour and other provisions for the army, the articles expressed in the margin, and the bearer hereof is entitled to receive from the State of Maryland, the current market price on this day, with six per cent. interest thereon.

Witness my hand this first day of March 1780.

WM. MAYNADIER, Com.

The back of this paper gives the appraisement of the wheat at seven shillings and sixpence in Spanish Milled

Dollars, signed by

WM. SHERWOOD,

HARVEY GOLDSBOROUGH,

SAM'L CHAMBERLAIN.

The State of Maryland

1780

Dr To ED. EDGERLY lt 2nd Md reg't

To 2 gals Rum, being stores due for the month of October

"43 lbs Sugar for ditto

To 21 lbs Brown Sugar, being stores not drawn for the months Augt. Sept and Oct. at $8 per lb.

£ 72.

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Auditor's office, Nov. 2, 1780, The above ac'ct proved and passed for £146, 5s, exclusive of 2 gals. Rum and 4 lbs of Coffee. T. GASSAWAY, D. Auditor.

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In the currency of the times, seven shillings and six pence made one dollar, this bill of nails, therefore, would amount to $1120.

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Contents Rec'd by Alex. W Davey

The Barrell of flour cost in Maryland currency $571.33.

WILLIAM RUSSELL

BILLS, &C.

187

To WM WILSON Dr Dec'r 1780

22nd To 2 pair small shoes at 85 dollars

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$170

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The money that was issued upon the credit of the confiscated lands was called red money, and the difference between the value of this and the old currency will be seen by the following account sales, viz:

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CHAPTER XVI.

THE MARYLAND LINE-Their Sufferings-The First to use the Bayonet-Their Battles-Their Losses.

1. No troops in the Continental army had rendered better service, endured more fatigue or won greater glory than the Maryland line. In proportion to their number, no body of men suffered more severely.

2. They were the first to use the bayonet against the experienced regulars of the enemy, and that in the earliest battle-and throughout the succeeding struggles of the war, they were most often called on to lead with that bloody weapon into the ranks of the foe. They seldom shrank from the encounter.

3. At Long Island, a fragment of a battalion. shook, with repeated charges, a whole brigade of British regulars. At White Plains, they held the advancé columns at bay. At Harlem Heights, they drove the enemy from the ground. At Germantown, they swept through the hostile camp, with their fixed bayonets, far in advance of the whole army. At Cowpens, and at Eutaw, their ranks with unloaded muskets bore down all opposition. At Guilford, and at Camden, though the victory was not theirs, they fought with a courage

Questions.-1. What is said of the Maryland line? 2. What were they the first to do? 3. Mention the several battles in which they distinguished themselves?

THE MARYLAND LINE.

189

that won the admiration and surprise of the enemy, aud brought from Fox, in the House of Commons, the exclamation: "one more such victory and the British army is ruined" Everywhere they used the bayonet with terrible effect.

4. Entering into the war two strong battalions, they were soon reduced to a single company.Again swelled up to seven regiments, they were again thinned by their losses to a single regiment, and before the campaign was well passed, they were once more recruited to four full battalions of more than two thousand men.

5. Two of their Colonels, Williams and Howard, were considered the best officers of their grade in the army. Gunby, Carville Hall, Smith, Stone, Ramsey and Ford, were equal to any others in the whole continental service.

6. General Williams was born in Prince George's county, in 1749, but in the succeeding year his home was changed to Washington county, where the Conococheague unites with the Potomac. At the age of thirteen, by the death of his father, he was thrown upon his own exertions. For a time he was in the Clerk's Office of Frederick county. Subsequently, he had a similar situation in Baltimore. It was in this vocation that he acquired those habits of regularity and method, which were

Questions.-4. What is said of their losses? 5. What of their officers? 6. What is said of Williams' birth and early life?

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