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Proprietary Governors.
1715-John HART.
1720-CAARLES CALVERT.
1727—BENEDICT LEONARD CALVERT.
1732-SAMUEL OGLE.
1733—CHARLES, LORD BALTIMORE.
1735-SAMUEL OGLE.
1742–Thomas BLADEN.
1747-SAMUEL OGLE.
1752—BENJAMIN TASKER, Pres.
1753-HORATIO SHARPE.
1769-ROBERT EDEN.

COLONIAL POPULATION OF MARYLAND.

1748...........

1634............... about 200 1660........................

..12,000 1665

...16,000 1671.

.20,000 1701....

..30,000

1715 ................... 50,200

.130,000 1756.

.154,188 1776............. about 200,000

FORMATION OF COUNTIES UNDER COLO

NIAL GOVERNMENT. 1633–ST. MARY'S.

1674–Cecil. -Kent.

1695-PRINCE GEORGE'S. 1650-ANNE ARUNDEL.

1706-QUEEN Anne's. 1654–CALVERT.

1742-- WORCESTER. 1658-CHARLES.

1748-FREDERICK. 1659-BALTIMORE.

1773—CAROLINE. 1661–TALBOT.

1773–HARFORD. 1666-SOMERSET.

1776-WASAINGTON. 1669_DORCHESTER.

1776-MONTGOMERY.

THE CONVENTION.

119

PART II.

CHAPTER I.

THE REVOLUTION- Convention-Power of Public Senti

ment-Resolution of Maryland to stand by Massachusetts, New York and Maryland— Washington appointed Commander-in-Chief-Formation of Maryland LineRiflemen- Want of Supplies.

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1. The convention called upon the people of Maryland to bury all private animosities, all religious disputes, all memory of past persecution, and “in the name of God, their country, and posterity, to unite in defence of the common rights and liberties.

2. On the 8th of December, 1774, the convention again assembled to make preparations for an armed resistance to the power of England. The old government still retained the form and machinery of power; the new, without these, possessed an irresistible authority throughout the colony. The source of its power was not its legal form, but public septiment. Resting on this it

ou

Questions.—1. What did the convention call upon all to do? 2. When did the convention again meet? For what purpose ? What was the source of the power of the convention?

needed not penalties and judicial tribunals, for the dominion that has public sentiment for its throne is irresistible.

3. All who refused to submit to the decrees of the convention were denounced by that body, and from that moment the offenders became the object of the withering scorn and contempt of their countrymen. And this has more terrors than the stake.

4. Having provided for the exercise of their authority, the convention resolved that if the crown attempted to carry out by force the measures against Massachusetts, Maryland would assist her to the last extremity. They then ordered all males from sixteen to fifty years of age, to be en. rolled and organized into companies; to be armed, equipped, and drilled, ready for instant service.

5. These resolves were immediately carried out; old and

young enrolled with the greatest enthusiasm. Maryland was girding herself for the struggle in which she won so glorious a name.

The convention was to meet again on the 24th of April, 1775; on the 19th the struggle broke out into open conflict, and the first blood shed in the revolutionary war was at Lexington. The blow was struck and the American people sprung to arms for the defence of their liberties.

Questions.-3. What was done to those who refused to submit I 4. What did the convention resolve to do? 5. When was the con vention to meet again? What took place on the 19th.

WASHINGTON NOMINATED.

121

6. Elsewhere, it was suggested by the timid that fubmission would ensure reconciliation.

The city of New York was cold, but in Maryland, the people were long since prepared for the resort to arms. The Connecticut troops had to be placed within a short distance of New York, to overawe the tory tendencies of many of the people. But subsequently, the Connecticut troops themselves were charged by Washington with deserting the cause of their country at the most critical moinent. Their ill-timed yearning for home was bad enough; but they not only took themselves off, but the ammunition also, leaving none for the Maryland troops, whose fondness for home never overcame their sense of honor.

7. After the battle of Bunker Hill, there was no more hesitation. Congress determined, not only to defend the rights of the people, but to drive out the British troops. Boston was ordered to be invested. Thos. Johnson, of Maryland, had the honor of nominating Gen. Washington, as Commander-in-Chief of the American forces. The election was by ballot, and was unanimous. Washington's modesty in accepting this important trust, was equalled only by the confidence the country reposed in his abilities, and was the surest evidence of his fitness.

Questions.-6. What did the timid suggest? What is said of New York, and of Maryland ? 7. What was the result of the battle of Bunker Hill? What did Congress determine? Who nominated Gen. Washington as commander-in-chief?

8 Although Johnson, of Maryland, nominated Washington, Adams, of Massachusetts, claimed the honor of first bringing him forward as the proper person for the emergency. Hancock, of Massachusetts, who was presiding, shewed evident marks of disapprobation and resentment at Adams' honorable allusions to “a gentleman from Virginia," for he did not mention Washington by name. New England was desirious of having one of their own men made commander-in-chief.

9 On the 26th of July, the convention of Maryland again met, and their first step was to adopt the famous "Association of Freemen of Maryland." This became the written constitution of the province until the new system was framed in 1776.

10. They also set about the formation of a regular force, to be composed of a battalion, of which Colonel Smallwood received the command, and of seven independent companies, numbering in all 1444 men, besides two companies of artillery, and one of marines.

11. By a resolution of Congress, two companies of riflemen were called for, from Maryland. These companies were soon filled with the hardy pioneers of Western Maryland. Capt. Cresap's company numbered one hundred and thirty men, who were

Questions.—8. What is said of Hancock? What did New England desire? 9. When did the convention again meet, and what was their first step? 10. What did they set about? 11. What is said of riflemen?

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