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Thereupon it agreed to reduce the hours of work to 12, to pay for overtime, and to abolish exorbitant fines. During the disorders 460 persons were arrested. The number of wounded was 208, including 20 soldiers and 40 policemen. The striking drivers took no part in the excesses or disturbances. Hungary.—The legislative power is exercised by a Parliament of two houses. The House of agnates, under the law of 1885, is composed of 20 archdukes, 286 hereditary peers, paying above 3,000 florins of land tax per annum, 40 ecclesiastical dignitaries of the Latin and Greek churches, 11 representatives of the Protestant confessions, 82 life peers, 17 official members, and 3 delegates of Croatia-Slavonia. The House of Representatives consisted in 1887 of 413 representatives of the towns and rural districts of Hungary and Transylvania and 40 delegates of Croatia and Slavonia. Croatia has a separate Diet and enjoys a measure of local self-government. The unio ministry is responsible to Parliament. Its composition in the beginning of 1889 was as follows: President of the Council and Minister of Finance, ad interim, Coloman Tisza de Boros-Jenö, appointed Nov. 25 1875: Minister of the Hono" or Militia, Baron Géza Fejérváry; Minister near the King's Person, and Minister of the Interior ad interim, Baron Béla Orczy; Minister of Education and Public Worship, Count Albin Csáky, appointed in September, 1888; Minister of Justice, Theophile de Fabiny; Minister of Public Works and ommunications, Gabriel de Baross; Minister of Agriculture, Industry, and Commerce, Count Paul Széchényi; Minister for Croatia and Slavonia, Coloman de Bedekovich. Area and Population. — Hungary, with Transylvania, has an area of 108,258 square miles and a population, as estimated at the close of 1887, of 14,715,927 souls; Croatia and Slavonia, with an area of 16,773 square miles, contained 2,065,910 souls; and the town and enclave of Fiume, outside the customs frontier, 8 square miles, had 22,029 inhabitants. The military population numbered 97,157, making the total population of the lands of the Hungarian Crown 16,901,023. The area of the Hungarian monarchy is 125,039 square miles, which gives a density of 135 per square mile, as compared with 191 in Austria. The number of births in 1886 was 759,617; of deaths, 539,535; of marriages, 160,674; the excess of births over deaths, 220,082. The Poio of illegitimate births was 8 per cent. The population of Buda-Pesth in 1886 was 422,557. Finance.—The revenues from various sources for the year 1889, were estimated as follow:

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840,690,166 6,561,988

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Total ordinary revenue..................... Transitory revenue........ .............

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The budget, as voted by Parliament, brings the total of expenditures up to 356,000,000 florins, or 6,000,000 florins more than the expected revenue. The final accounts for 1888 make the total receipts 342,986,541 florins, while the exo were 352,746,503 florins, leaving a eficit of 9,769,962 florins, which was nearly 3,000,000 florins less than the deficit estimated in the budget. It is a favorable sign that the final accounts make a better showing than the budget for the first time in the history of Hunrian finance. The new Minister of Finance, r. Weckerle, expects to establish an equilibrium between revenue and expenditure, while providing means for educational and economic development, and for strengthening the national defenses. He proposes a comprehensive reform of the tariff in the interest of trade and manufactures. The Army Bill.—A new army bill was carried through by the Government in 1889 after a Parliamentary contest lasting two and a half months, during which the Premier was subjected to a storm of popular disapproval and attacks of the Opposition more violent than he had to endure §. he enforced the assent of Parliament to the occupation of Bosnia and Herzegovina o: the will of the Hungarian nation. The bill was framed by the Minister-President in consultation with the military authorities and the Common Ministry, as it was necessary that a uniform law should be adopted for both halves of the empire. The military laws, like other laws bearing on common affairs and having the nature of a treaty, are made operative for a period of ten years. The most objectionable feature of the new bill was that making a knowledge of German a necessary condition for admitting one-year volunteers to the rank of officers of the reserves. Connected with this was another unpopular provision reuiring one-year volunteers who could not pass their final examinations to serve a second year, the object being to qualify them for non-commissioned officers in the reserve. The German language was once familiar to all the middle and upper classes. The younger generation, however, §'. educated so of Magyarizing, which was pursued by the late Minister of Education Trefort, in obedience to a national movement that was a part of the general reaction in non-German parts of the empire against the Germanizing policy of the old bureaucracy. While exterminating German from the primary schools, the Government embodied a provision in the educational act of 1883 making the study of German obligatory in the intermediate schools. In rebutting the objections to the army bill the ministers asserted that every one who had passed through the curriculum of the gymnasia knew enough German to fullfil the conditions of the officers’ examination. This would be true if the educational laws had been carried out, but during the Magyar revival German has in many schools been entirely neglected. Statistics show that sixty per cent. of the graduates of secondary schools are quite ignorant of German. Hence there was widespread dissatisfaction over the

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military law that shuts out so large a propor-.

tion of the educated youth from the rank of officer, and since it runs counter to a patriotic impulse that has created a Magyar literature and exalted the national spirit, the Opposition seized the opportunity for a telling assault on the minister who has governed Hungary for fourteen ears, and in the opinion of many has outlived is usefulness. There are two Opposition parties, which now for the first time could take common ground against the Government. The Conservatives, who call themselves the Moderate Opposition, led by Count Albert Apponyi, derive their support from the feudal aristocracy, who are kept out of what they consider their rightful place at the head of affairs by Tisza and his “Mamelukes,” by which term they opprobriously designate the well-disciplined ministerial majority. Their friends and allies the Roman Catholic hierarchy object to Tisza as the advocate of secular education and civil marriage and as the chief instrument in bringing about the alliance of Austria-Hungary with the anti-Papal Government of Italy. The chiefs of the party, however, would accept the triple alliance and all the achievements of Tisza's administration. Their objection to him is personal, not political. They accuse him of tolerating gross administrative and electoral corruption, of shielding offending officials, and of filling the highest places in the government with incompetent persons who have won his favor by blind subserviency. The other Opposition party, the Extreme Left, can no more resent a policy to replace Tisza's than can the onservatives. It is the remnant of the party of Kossuth which still clings, rather as a party tradition than from present conviction, to the idea of a merely personal union between the two monarchies. During the excitement over the twentyfifth paragraph of the military bill requiring examinations in German, the exiled patriot wrote from Turin that Hungary should have a separate national army. This exploded idea when revived by his followers found no lodgment in the popular mind. The army bill was first discussed in the Austrian Reichsrath, where its severe provisions relating to service in camp met with much opposition. The bill in its original form was so

objectionable to Tisza's own party that no one besides himself and the Honved minister defended it in the Liberal Club. Article XIV was denounced by Liberal jurists, as well as by the Opposition, as abrogating the constitutional right of Parliament to determine the size of the army, because, while fixing the annual recruit at 103,100 men for the ensuing ten years, it omitted a clause contained in the acts of 1868 and 1879 limiting the operation of this provision to that period. This technical question of legal phraseology threatened to divide the ministerial party. Tisza at first declared that he would resign if his party would not | the bill as drawn up in conferences by which he was bound. Subsequently he offered to make a declaration to be entered on the records whereby, if a new army law should not be agreed on at the end of ten years, the Government should be bound to bring in a provisional recruiting act each year. Count Csáky, the Minister of Education, sent out a decree that the classes in German and German literature in the intermediate schools should use the German language in the class-room, and that students should be examined orally in German if their written papers are unsatisfactory. In defending the examination of candidates for the army in the German language the Prime Minister pointed out the dangers that would result in war from the inability of officers to understand the word of command or to communicate with their superiors, and declared that it was the prerogative of the Emperor to decide what should be the service language. This drew forth a protest from the Opposition, who accused the minister of foisting upon the Crown the responsibility for his acts. The army bill was voted as the basis of a special debate in the Lower House on Jan. 29 by a majority of 267 against 141. Protesting students and citizens filled the galleries and lobbies, shouting “Tisza, retire ' " When the President of the Chamber threatened to clear the house members of the Opposition frantically denied his right to expel spectators, while their friends in the galle .."their cries of “Resign l’ “Down wit the traitor Tisza ' " The Premier addressed the House in his imperturbable manner, saying that it would be a sad omen for parliamentary government in Hungary when ministers resigned at the dictation of the streets. He left the building secretly in a closed carriage to escape being maltreated by the mob. His brother was stoned as he drove away, and Count Tibor Karolyi, one of the Opposition, was pelted with mud and roughly handled by mistake. The crowds broke gas lanterns and smashed windows where photographs of the Prime Minister were exposed. The police did not attempt to clear the streets till late, and in the evening the military had to be sent to their assistance. On the following day Hussars guarded the approaches of the House of Parliament, despite the protests of the Opposition. The students and town rabble again took possession of the streets, and many persons were injured before order was restored. The agitation, which was allayed for a time by the death of the Crown Prince, broke out afres on Feb. 11 and 14, simultaneously with a visit of the King. The Opposition accused the Premier of having invited the King to Buda-Pesth for the purpose of influencing the action of Parliament and awing his opponents into silence; and when the King, in an address to Parliament, rebuked the Opposition for their want of patriotism in resisting the proposals of the Government, Tisza was held responsible, and popular excitement was intensified. When complaints were made of rude treatment of students by the police, the minister said there was no way to distinguish them from street roughs. This difficulty the students decided to avoid o henceforth wearing bright-colored caps. A law student named Takasch, who was about to lead the mob across the Danube to demand of the King the dismissal of Tisza, was lodged in jail, giving the enemies of the Government an opportunity to declaim against the violation of the right of habeas corpus. A great demonstration against Tisza and the army bill was organized for Sunday, Feb. 17. The Government, instead of forbidding it, as some of the ministerialists advised, sent a force of police to clear the way. A procession of 25, persons, marshaled by students, marched through the city, oiving Eljen cheers for the King, and crying “Tisza, retire l’” In spite of the firm stand that he assumed at first, Tisza was led, as he had often been before, to make a compromise, to which he obtained the Emperor's consent. Words were introduced in paragraph fourteen restricting the operation of the clause relating to recruitment to ten years, and assurances were #o that Hungarian military text-books would be used ; that candidates could be examined in their mother tongue, Magyar or Croatian, on technical details, and need only show sufficient knowledge of German to understand military orders; and that a second year of service would not be required except from volunteers who had neglected their military studies, but were qualified in respect to income, moral character, and other requisites. These concessions gave the leaders of the Opposition a chance to denounce Tisza as a man who would not be bound by his declarations and who would concede principles in order to retain office, yet they broke the force of the hostile agitation. Some of the Premier's enemies charged him with jobbery, especially with procuring the construction of a Government railroad line near his property. Such attacks were, however, discountenanced by the better element of the party. The obstruction to the army bill and the political assaults on Tisza were continued with the object of keeping alive the popular dissatisfaction, and preparing for his defeat, if not in Parliament, at the popular elections three years hence. On March 19, Rohonczy, a Liberal deputy, fired a revolver at Coloman Schamozil, a student who had struck him on the floor of the House. This act gave rise to fresh demonstrations on the part of the students. Tisza's carriage was attacked on the following day, some of the deputies were bruised, and the military were called out to suppress the riot. The army bill was finally passed at the third reading amid ironical German cheers of “ Hoch " '' for the Prime Minister. The Austrian Upper House adopted the bill as amended by the Hungarian Chamber on April 8, and on April 10 it was voted by a two-third majority in the Austrian House of Deputies, and passed by the Hungarian House of Lords almost unanimously.

Reconstruction of the Cabinet.—The contest over the army bill warned Tisza of the necessity of strengthening his position by a reconstitution of the Cabinet. Fabinyi, the Minister of Justice, resigned, and was succeeded by Desider Szilagyi, who had formerly been a member of the Moderate Opposition and was accounted the ablest debater in Parliament. Baross took the rovisional administration of the Ministry of the nterior from Orczy. Count Paul Szechenyi, who, like Fabinyi, lacked parliamentary experience, retired from the Ministry of Commerce, and was succeeded by Count Julius Szapary. This department was converted into a Ministry of Agriculture, and a great part of its former business was transferred to the Ministry of Comunications after the Austrian model. Dr. Weckerle was promoted to the head of the Ministry of Finance, which he had actually directed for some time. Szögenyi-Marisch, Assistant Minister of Foreign Affairs at Vienna under Count Kálnoky, though urged by the Emperor, was unwilling to take charge of the Ministry of the Interior, which continued to be administered by Baross till June, when the vacant post was ići by the appointment of Count Ceza Teleky, who went to work with the Minister of Justice on a project for the reform of local administration and of the antiquated municipal system of Hungary by giving the Central Government more power and influence over local government. The Occupied Provinces.—Bosnia and Herzegovina, which were occupied by Austrian troo in accordance with the decision of the Berlin Congress, have been administered by Austria|#. since 1879, and form a part of the Austro-Hungarian customs union, though still nominally subject to Turkey. The Sanjak of NoviBazar has been held by an Austrian milita force, but is administered by Turkish civil officials. The population of Bosnia, 16,200 square miles in extent, was 187,574 in 1885. Herzogovina, with an area of 3,540 square miles, had 187,574 inhabitants. The military forces in the provinces numbered 26,823, making their total |. 1,362,914. There were 492,710 Moammedans, 571,250 Greek Orthodox, 265,788 Roman Catholics, and 5,805 Jews. For the administration of Bosnia and Herzeovina in 1889 the estimated requirements are ,430,000 florins, exceeding the expected revenue by 40,000 florins. The expenses of the army of occupation are 4,423,000 florins. The Bosnian budget for 1890 shows a small surplus. It amounts to 9,686,641 florins, having grown from 5,686,790 florins in 1880. The position of Austria-Hungary in the Orient was altered by the abdication of King Milan of Servia and the repudiation of Austrian tutelage. Count Kálnoky, in addressing the Delegations, though denying that there was distinct danger to the peace, acknowledged a tendency to pessimistic views and the uncertainty of the situation, which might any moment change for the worse. The Emperor-King spoke in his reply to the addresses of the presidents of the Delegations of King Milan's regrettable renunciation of the throne, and expressed the hope that the wisdom and patriotism of the Servians would preserve their country from grave dangers. he return of the anti-Austrian party to power in Servia was followed by the armament of the Servian militia and a revival of the Great Servian movement, disturbing Bosnia, which had almost settled down to peaceful development. Revolutionary proclamations appeared in Bosnia and Novi-Bazar, and disturbances occurred, the details of which were kept as secret as possible by the authorities, who enforced martial law with unusual rigor. In Russia it was rumored that Austria had come to an arrangement with the Porte for the occupation of the part of the Sanjak of NoviBazar still held by Turkish troops in accordance with the clause in the Treaty of Berlin stipulating that Austria may occupy the second portion when the two powers have arrived at an understanding. In Italy, where any further advance

of Austria toward Salonica would be regarded with distrust, the disturbances in the Sanjak were suspected of being a product of Austrian machinations intended to furnish a pretext for the annexation of the remaining half of NoviBazar. The Austrian administration of the Occupied Provinces has more recently been calculated to #.". the prosperity of the country and conciliate the people, especially the Servian element, which is |. most energetic and proressive. Whereas the Turks always selected a Phanariot Greek as Metropolitan of Mostar, the Austrian Administration appointed first the Serb Leontic Radulovich, and after his death in May, 1888, the Bosnian Seraphin Perovich, whom the Mussulmans deported in 1872 to Fezzan, where he remained |''. occupation in 1878.

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BAPTISTS. I. Regular Baptists in the United States.—The “American Baptist YearBook” for 1889 gives the statistics of the regular Baptist churches in the United States for 1888, as follow: Number of associations, 1,312; of ordained ministers, 21,420; of churches, 32,900; of members, 2,997,794; of baptisms during the year, 134,563; of Sunday-schools, 16,543, returning 123,381 officers and teachers, and 1,158,665 pupils. Value of church property, $53,568,502. Amount of contributions reported: For salaries and expenses, $6,218,383: for missions, $943,814; for education, $132,536; for miscellaneous purposes, $2,068,644. The general statistics for the whole world, compiled from tables of 1888 and 1887, when the former were not at hand give: North America (including the United States, British Provinces, Mexico, the West Indies, and Central America and islands), 1,336 associations, 33,933 churches, 22,019 ministers, 3,116,724 members, and 141,566 baptisms during the year; Brazil, 6 churches, 7 ministers, 210 members, and 49 baptisms: Europe, including Great Britain, 80 associations, 3,546 churches, 2,596 ministers, 401,249 members, and 5.903 baptisms: Asia, 8 associations, 732 churches, 496 ministers, 71,474 members, and 4,919 baptisms; Africa, 3 associations, 88 churches, 76 ministers, 3,673 members, and 204 baptisms; Australasia, 6 associations, 178 churches, 291 ministers, and 15,128 members; total, 1,432 associations, 38,483 churches, 25,485 ministers, 3,608,458 members, and 152,631 baptisms during the year.

The 7 Baptist theological institutions in the United States returned for 1888, 53 instructors and 641 students for the ministry: 34 universities and colleges returned 349 instructors, with upward of 5,000 pupils, 869 of whom were preparing for the ministry: 32 seminaries for female education exclusively, 317 instructors, with 4,000 pupils; 42 other seminaries, 246 instructors, with 4,786 pupils, 299 of whom were preparing for the ministry; and 17 institutions for the colored race and Indians, 124 instructors, with 2,502 pupils, 285 of whom were preparing for the ministry; making in all, 132 institutions, with 1,089 instructors and 17,552 pupils, 2,094 of whom were preparing for the ministry. These institutions also returned the

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aggregate value of their grounds and buildings at $9,341,218; of libraries and apparatus at $1,204,433; and of endowments at $9,130,728. They received in 1888 gifts amounting to $739,012, and had in their libraries 443,471 volumes. The o Congress met in its eighth annual session at Toronto, Ontario, Nov. 12. D. E. Thomson presided in the absence of the president. The subjects discussed were: “Organizations for Christian Work other than the Church,” by Dr. L. A. Crandall, of Cleveland, Ohio, Rev. Joshua Donovan, of Toronto, and the Rev. Alexander Blackburn, of Lowell, Mass.: “Natural and Artificial Monopolies,” by the Hon. David Mills, of the Dominion Parliament, Rev. Walter Rauschenbusch and Rev. Leighton Williams, of New York, and D. E. Thomson of Toronto; “The o of Christian Consciousness,” by Prof. Albert H. Newman and thirteen other speakers: “The Relations of Church and State.” by the Rev. A. H. Munro, of St. Thomas, Ontario, Mr. D. E. Thompson, and other speakers; “The Sabbath Question,” by the Rev. J. W. A. Stewart, of Rochester, the Rev. A. P. McDiarmio, of Ottawa, and other speakers; and “The Disarmament of Nations,” by the Rev. Dr. George D. Boardman, of Philadelphia, Mr. J. E. Wells, editor of the “Canadian Baptist,” and Prof. Jacob. G. Schurman, of Cornell University. American Baptist Home Mission Society. —The fifty-seventh annual meeting of the American Baptist Home Mission Society was held in Boston, Mass., May 17. The Hon. C. W. Kingsley presided. The total receipts for the year, exclusive of church-edifice loans repaid, had been $375,255. Of the expenditures, $151,860 had been applied to the payment of missionaries' salaries, $65,777 to teachers’ salaries, $47,514 for special educational purposes, and $24,314 to gifts for church-edifice work. The society's operations had been conducted in 45 States and Territories and in Ontario, Manitoba, Alaska, and three States of Mexico, where 790 laborers had been supported wholly or in part: of these agents, 178 |. been laboring among foreign populations, 229 among colored people, Indians, and Mexicans, and 374 among American whites. Seventy-four new mission stations had been taken up—3 among the Indians, 1 among the Chinese, 10 among the colored people, and 20 among the foreign populations. Seventeen hundred and ninety-five churches and out-stations had been supplied, 181 churches organized, 3,646 members received by baptism, and 786 Sundayschools, having 53,065 attendants, taken care of. The whole number of members in the mission churches was 34,052; the amount of benevolent contributions reported from them, $34,101. Missionaries to the foreign Poio were endloyed among the French, chiefly in New Engand ; Germans, with whom the society co-operates with the German Baptist Conference; Scandinavians; Welsh; Bohemians; Poles; and Portuguese. The society had entered into cooperation with most of the State conventions or general associations of colored Baptists in the South. Twenty-one missionaries were employed in the Indian Territory, and attention had been bestowed upon the Indians at Pyramid Lake, Nev. Two missionaries were employed in Alaska. Missions were maintained among the Chinese at San Francisco, Cal., and Portland, Ore. Twenty-five missionaries and teachers, 19 of whom were natives of the country, were engaged in Mexico; they had occupied 44 stations and returned, 14 churches, 70 baptisms, and 6 schools, with 244 pupils. Eighty-seven churches had been aided by gifts and loans, in the amount of $33,764, in obtaining houses of worship. The Loan fund amounted to $119,719. An effort to secure $15,000 for the erection of fort chapels had been successful. The educational institutions comprised 13 incorporated and 7 unincorporated schools, besides day schools in connection with several mission stations, and returned 165 teachers, with 4,183 enrolled pupils. Of these schools, 15, with 131 teachers and 3,106 pupils, were among the colored people; and 4, with 371 pupils, among the Indians. Four hundred and eight of the colored pupils were studying for the ministry. The Leonard Medical School of Shaw University, Raleigh, N. C., returned 43 students. A training school for nurses was in o at Spelman Seminary, Atlanta, Ga.; a law school had been provided for at Shaw University; and industrial departments were attached to eight of the institutions. Publication Society.—The sixty-fifth annual meeting of the American Baptist Publication Society was held in Boston, Mass., May 19 and 20. The Hon. Samuel A. Crozer presided. The i. to the treasury were returned as having been larger than in any previous year, they having been in all the departments $626,360. Of this amount $461,341 had been received in the book department, $134,652 in the missionary department, and $30,366 in the Bible department. The assets had increased from so at the end of the previous year to $791,692. Ninety-eight publications had been added to the catalogue, and 30,819,850 copies of all the publications had been printed during the year, making the whole number of copies from the beginning of the society's operation 390,215,371 of books, pamphlets, tracts, and periodicals; of the number printed during the year 29,127,550 were of periodicals. One hundred and twenty-eight missionaries had been employed, under whose labors 955 persons had bo. 36 churches .."420 Sunday-schools organized, and

521 institutes held and addressed; 256 Sundayschools had been aided by gifts of from five to fifteen dollars' worth of books, Scriptures, periodicals, etc.; and 336 pastors and ministerial students have been aided with grants for their libraries, of values ranging from five to fifteen dollars. Reports were made of missionary work in Germany, Sweden, and Turkey (Constantinople, Armenia, and Bithynia). Grants had been made in the Bible department of 41,152 copies of the Scriptures in the English, German, Swedish, Danish, Spanish, French, Italian, Chinese, Welsh, Norwegian, Portuguese, Dutch, and Armenian languages, to the value of $10,737 net. A fund of $4,000 had been contributed for the further perfection of what is known as the “Bible Union Revised New Testament,” and about $6,000 for the completion of the revision and stereotyping of the Old Testament. A special committee which had been appointed at a previous meeting of the society reported concerning the rules to govern the further revision.

Missionary Union.—The seventy-fifth annual meeting of the American Baptist Missionary Union was held in Boston, Mass., May 15 and 16. The Hon. Francis Wayland presided. The receipts for all purposes during the past year had been $415,144, and the appropriations (including $16,750 added to permanent funds and accounts) had been $423,318. Four Woman’s Foreign Missionary societies—those of the East, of the West, of California, and of Oregon —had contributed in all $112,750, which had been applied to the support of women missionaries and to labors among women. From the heathen missions—including those among the tribes of Burmah, in Assam, among the Telugus, in China, Japan, the Congo, and Liberia—were returned 1,179 out-stations, 279 missionaries, 780 native preachers, and 418 other native helpers, making a total of 1,477 missionary laborers; 642 churches, 236 of which were self-sustaining; 65272 members; 5,337 baptized during 1888; 464 Sunday-schools with 7,905 pupils; 983 schools, 287 of which were self-supporting, with 1,060 native teachers and 18,574 pupils; and 608 churches and chapels; value of church property $545,883; contributions of the native churches $50,219. From the European missions in Sweden, Germany, Russia, Denmark, France, and Spain were returned 271 ordained and 508 unordained, in all, 1,296 preachers, 674 churches, and 69,141 members, with 4,971 baptized in 1888. The work of translating, printing, and distributing the Bible in the languages of the several missionary fields had been continued. Editions in Burman, Karen, and Shan were in press in Rangoon: the Kachin language was being reduced to writing, preparatory to translating the Bible into it ; a translation into the Assamese language had been completed; translations were in progress into the Garo and the Naga languages of Assam ; translations were being made into the Fiot, Bateke, and Balolo dialects of the Congo: revisions and new issues of other translations were mentioned; so that in one shape or another the publication of the Scriptures, or preparation for it, had been continued in sixteen languages or dialects.

The Woman's Baptist Foreign ...” Society, Boston, received in 1888, $74,433. It re

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