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Mary

Ebenezer Swan Jonathan Butterfield John Williams Henry Dunster Thos. Wellington Ephraim Frost

Abraham Hill Gershom Cutter Francis Locke Walter Russell James Cutler John Swan John Cutter Joseph Adams William Cutter Thomas Frost Jason Winship John Winship Wm. Dickson Anna Fessenden, widow Andrew Wilson Edward Russell Philip Carteret

Mary

The females were

Elisabeth,
Ruth

66 "
Martha

66 66 Chary

66 66 Sarah

66 66
Sarah Cook, widow
Sarah

wife of
Mehitable
Elisabeth

66 66
Elisabeth

66 66
Alice

66 66
Elisabeth
Lydia

66
Rachel

66 66 Anne

66 66 Hannah

66 66 Elisabeth

66 66 Ruth

66 66 Anne Cutter, widow Sarah

wife of
Sarah

66 66
Elisabeth 66 66
Elisabeth Cutter, widow
Mary

wife of

66 66
Lydia
Patience

66 66
Anna

66 16 Martha

66 66
Mercy Perry, widow
Jane,

wife of
Ruth
Sarah
Deborah

66 66
Sarah

6 66
Sarah

66 66
Rachel
Mary

66 16
Rebecca
Sarah

16 16
Sarah

16 "
Abigail
Mary
Mary,

daughter of
Elisabeth
Deborah Chrissen
Rebecca, ughter
Martha

i 16
Abigail
Elisabeth

Anna

Joseph Russell
Joseph Winship
Seth Reed
Thomas Hall
Gershom Cutter, jr.
John Wilson

George Cutter Wm. Robbins Josiah Robbins Joseph Robbins Sam’l Smith Eben'r Prentice Jonathan Butterfield, jr. John Butterfield Zacheriah Hill Thomas Williams Moses Harrington James Cutler, jr. Eph’m Frost, jr. Eben'r Swan Francis Locke

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Some memoranda from the Church Records of N. W. Precinct, Cambridge. 1739, Sept. 12. Mr. Samuel Cooke was ordained Pastor of this church and congregation. The first church in Cambridge, this town, and the Churches of Lexington, Medford and Watertown assisted in that solemnity.

Nov. 17. Messrs. John Cutter & John Winship were unanimously chosen Deacons of this Church and accepted soon after. At the same meeting Messrs. William Russell, Henry Dunster, Ephraim Frost, Jonathan Butterfield, jr., and the Pastor were chosen to wait upon the Rev. Mr. Appleton & the ist Church in this Town, for their advice & assistance in procuring utensils for our communion table; and to endeavour an adjustment with them of the utensils supposed to belong in common to the Churches in Cambridge.

Dec. 2. At a meeting of this church, The Brethren understanding that the First Church in this Town had agreed to give us twenty-five pounds (old tenor) out of the Church Stock towards furnishing our communion table, Voted,—That the two Deacons be appointed to wait upon said first Church to receive said money for the purpose abovesaid.

Dec. 4. The Deacons received said £25.

Dec. 7th, Voted by this Church, that their Pastor & Deacons be appointed to give the thanks of this Church to the first Church in Cambridge, for their respect and kindness to us, in giving twenty-five pounds towards procuring utensils for our communion table; and also to Mrs. Rebecca Whitmore of Medford, who gave six pounds for the same use.

1759, Dec. 5. At a Church Meeting, after a sermon preached from Acts 6: 3, Thomas Hall & Joseph Adams jr were chosen Deacons. And took their seat Dec. 23d.

1792, April 19. At a church meeting after a sermon preached from Acts 6: 3, Ephraim Frost, jr. & John Adams were chosen Deacons and took their seat May 20.

1811, Oct. 27. The Church voted, As some inconvenience attends the administration of the ordinance of the Lord's supper by the deficiency of utensils and the encrease of communicants, “ That such addition be made as shall be necessary ;” that the expense be defrayed out of the Church collection or contributions usually taken on communion days, and that the two Deacons viz Ephraim Frost & John Adams, together with the Pastor, be requested to make the necessary addition, previous to the next communion. — accordingly

Oct. 30. The Pastor & two Deacons bought two flagons and four silver plated cups. The flaggons were 10 dollars and the cups 25 dol's. $35.

REV. SAMUEL COOKE. The writer is indebted to the late Miss Anne Bradshaw for the use of Rev. Mr. Cooke's private papers.

Rev. Samuel Cooke, in whom were united the “ social friend," the " man of science," the “ eminent and faithful clergyman," whose “ praise was in all the churches,” was ordained the first minister of the Second Precinct in Cambridge, now Arlington, Sept. 12, 1739, and died June 4, 1783, in the seventy-fifth year of his age,

and the forty-fourth of his ministry. He was a native of Hadley, Mass., and a graduate of Harvard College in the class of 1735; was distinguished by his good sense and prudence, and for his ardent patriotism. Nov. 12, 1758, he preached a sermon upon the occasion of the return of Capt. Adams and company from the French war, with the loss of only a single man. He preached the “ Election Sermon ” of 1770

-which was printed*-a discourse whose patriotic sentiments " came home to men's business and bosoms." He rebuked tyranny and oppression, and at his suggestion a bill to prevent the importation of slaves from Africa into the province was passed in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, but owing to troublous times it seems to have gone no further. Slavery practically was abolished in this Commonwealth in 1781, ten years afterwards. A sermon of his at the ordination of C. Brown, 1748 ; of W. Symmes, 1759, and a sermon for a memorial of the Lexington battle, preached in 1777, were published.

At the commencement of the Revolutionary conflict in 1775, when Mr. Cooke was nearly seventy years old, he was a marked man, because he had been so out-spoken in the cause of freedom. The parsonage where he dwelt -the recent residence of his granddaughter, the late Miss Bradshaw-was pierced by British bullets during the retreat from Lexington, and was used as a hospital after the battle. On the day of the action he was ready with his encouragement, and with counsel and comfort for the distressed and afflicted. When the enemy approached Menotomy in full retreat before the arms of

the victorious provincials, his spirit was stirred within bim, and he longed to bear a part in the fray; but his son Samuel took the old gentleman, much against his will, into a chaise, and carried him away to a place of safety.

In 1778 Mr. Cooke wrote the genealogical and historical account of himself and his family here presented. It was written in a small pocket diary, and reads substantially as follows.

Cambridge, Second Precinct, April 8th, 1778. Samuel Cooke, born in Hadley January 11th, 1709, was the son of Mr. Samuel and Mrs. Anne Cooke; the grandson on his father's side to Aaron Cooke, Esq., and Sarah Cooke; and the great-grandson of Major Cooke, of Northampton, and of William and Sarah Westwood, of Hadley, who came from Old England. These arrived with their families at Cambridge, N. E., in 1634 or 1635, and removing with others settled at Hartford. About the year 1650, they with others removed up Connecticut river, and began new settlements—Major Cooke at Northampton, and Mr. Westwood at Hadley.f My grand

* This sermon was preached in Cambridge, in the audience of his “Honor Thomas Hutchinson, Esq., Lieut. Governor and Commander in Chief; the Honorable His Majesty's Council, and the Honorable House of Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay in New-England, May 30th, 1770.-Being the Anniversary for the Election of His

Province.” This sermon has been reprinted, with illustrative notes, &c., in Thornton's Pulpit of the American Revolution, pp. 147-186.

+ Sylvester Judd, Esq., the well-known historian of Hadley, in a letter to the late Rev. Samuel Sewall, of Burlington, Mass. (April 6, 1846), says this genealogical account contains some mistakes which show how early and easily tradition runs into error. It may be justly supposed the writer relied entirely on his memory when at a very advanced age be wrote concerning matters, some of which occurred well nigh a century before he was

father Aaron Cooke married Sarah, only child of said William and Sarah Westwood, removed to Hadley, lived with his father-in-law, and upon his death, which was not long after, in right of said wife became entitled to the whole of Mr. Westwood's estate-left in England-at Hartford--and in Hadley. The estate in England after some time my grandfather sold, but employing a knave, lost it. The estate at Hartford he gave to his son Aaron. That in Hadley to his sons Westwood and Samuel, and to his son Moses his estate from his own father in Northampton. He died 1716, aged 76. He had eight children: viz., Sarah, married to Daniel Hovey ; Joanna, to Samuel Porter; Aaron, at Hartford ; Westwood, Samuel and Moses, all married at Hadley ; Elizabeth, married to Ichabod Smith, and Bridget, married to John Bernard. These had all large families, and all survived my grandfather, except Joanna, who died in 1712, soon after the birth of her eighteenth living child. My grandmother Sarah Cooke died 1730, aged 87.* My father Samuel Cooke, about the year 1698, married Anne Marsh, daughter of Mr. Jonathan and Mrs. Dorcas Marsh, of Hadley. Besides three which died in infancy, seven of their children had families : viz., Anne, married to Aaron Cooke; Sarah, to Timothy (Emmons?); Hannah, to William Dickinson ; Samuel; Mehitable, to Jonathan Smith ; Miriam, to Josiah Pierce; and Jonathan. All survived our parents except Hannah. She buried six child. ren in infancy, and her husband in 1741; she was left with two sons --six and two years old, -and returned with her children to my father's house, where she died in 1745, aged 39. My father died September 16, 1746, aged 76. My mother died March, 1758, aged 77.

My father by his will left his homestead at my mother's decease wholly to my brother Jonathan in lieu of my education. The rest of his estate was equally to be divided between my brother and me--we paying legacies to our sisters.

I began to learn Latin in 1720, but being then the only son I was called off to the farm till a brother, born almost out of season, and growing, allowed me to resume my study in the year 1729. I entered Harvard College in 1731–had my first degree, 1735–kept school part of a year at Roxbury-one year and a part was in the College Buttery-Nov. 1737, went to Col. Royall's, Medford, for a year to instruct his son-and in 1738 returned to College. I then preached six months at Marlborough, and six at Roxbury and Menotomy. In May, 1739,

born. Mr. Judd asserts, from written authentic sources, that Major Cooke settled first in

and removed thence to Windsor; whereas William Westwood settled first at Cambridge, and removed thence to Hartford, and was at Cambridge three or four years before 1634-5. He further declares Westwood could not have removed to Hadley and Maj. Cooke to Northampton about 1650, for the settlement of Hadley was not begun until 1659, and Northampton till 1654. Moreover, they removed up the river in 1660-1, and Westwood's wife was Bridget, not Sarah. (Vide Hist. Hadley, 594, and Savage, G, Dict.)

"Mr. Westwood died in 1669, and his wife in 1676; the will of each is on record in Hadley, with the inventory of his estate; there is no allusion to any property in England, which must have been sold-and lost, perhaps-before his death. He had no estate in Northampton, and Aaron Cooke, of Hadley, had no estate in Northampton from his own father.' His father gave him some estate at Windsor, where he married Sarah Westwood in 1661. Mr. Cooke has arranged the children of his grandfather according to their birth. Sarah married, I have supposed, Thomas Hovey, not Daniel. Joanna, who married Samuel Porter, may have had eighteen children, but the Hadley record has noted only 14."-Letter of Mr. Judd.

The able and interesting History of Hadley makes frequent and honorable mention of Westwood and his son-in-law, Cooke, and presents a genealogy of their descendants,

I received a call to settle in the ministry in this place. In July, I gave my answer, and on September 12, 1739, I was ordained the first minister of this Second Precinct in Cambridge.*

The Church was gathered the preceding Sabbath by the Rev. John Hancock, of Lexington, and consisted of eighty-three memberseighty of which were from the Cambridge Church, and three had belonged to other churches. I boarded the first year in the family of Mr. Joseph Adams, at 1os. per week-silver being then 26s. per ounce.

On May 12, 1740, I bought one acre of ground of Mr. Jason Russell for house, which was raised July 17, at the expense of the people.The frame being given, and the cellar and well dug and stoned gratis, and the boards and shingles carted from Sudbury and Billerica free of charge to me.

I married Oct. 2, 1740, Miss Sarah Porter, daughter of Mr. Samuel and Mrs. Anne Porter, of Hadley, and on Oct. 16, I brought her to my house.† On Aug. 2, 1741, a son was born to us, and on the oth he was baptized Samuel, and on the 14th inst. Samuel died. On the 22d the mother died, both dying of the throat distemper. My sister Miriam (now Pierce) kindly came and kept my house.

I married September 23, 1742, Anna Cotton, daughter of the Rev. Mr. John and Mrs. Mary Cotton, of Newtown. On the 30th she came home. On July 10, 1743, a daughter was born, and on the same day was baptized Anna. On the 14 July, 1745, twins were born, and baptized the same day Samuel § and Elizabeth. On May 15, 1747, a daughter born and was baptized the 17th, Mary. On Aug. 9, 1750, another daughter was born, who was baptized the 12th, Sarah. A son was born 29 March, 1752, who the same day was baptized Samuel. (N. B. The foregoing in Old Stile.) 1754, April 17, a daughter born, baptized Hannah Gibbs.** 1755, Oct. 17, a daughter born, lived one hour. 1756, November 30, a daughter still born. On Dec. 29, 1758, a daughter was born, and was baptized on the 30th, Rebecca.

* In 1732 the inhabitants of the northwesterly part of Cambridge were by an act of the Legislature formed into a distinct and separate precinct.-Holmes, Hist. Cambridge.

Menotomy, or the Northwest Precinct in Cambridge, included a part of the upper part of Charlestown, afterwards annexed to West Cambridge, now Arlington.

+ "Cambridge, 27th Sept. 1740. These may certify whom it may concern that the purpose of marriage between the Rev. Mr. Samuel Cooke of Cambridge, and Mrs. Sarah Porter of Hadley has been entered and published in Cambridge as the law directs.

AND' BORDMAN, jun. Town Clerk." “ Hadley, Oct. 2, 1740. These may certifie that the within certified persons were joined in marriage.

GRINDALL Rawson, Clerk." · + · 1765, Oct. 24, joined in marriage by Rev. Sam'ı Cooke, Ezekiel Hall, of Medford, and Anna Cooke, of Cambridge. 1766, July 17, Medford, born Ezekiel Hall."

Died Aug. 21, 1745, after a " distressing sore mouth of 30 days.”
|| Married Rev. Jonathan Burr, July 19, 1787. Died March 9, 1788.
The following acrostic probably refers to him:

Save, Lord, this tender son of ours,
A son whom thou didst give,
May he not die in tender hours,
Unto thy praise still live.
Each day commended to thy care,
Let him thy tender mercies share.
Christ in his arms did infants take,
Of saving grace may this partake.
O earthly blessings needful, shine,
Keep from every hurtful snare,

Ever guided by thy watchful care.
** Married Henry Bradshaw, of Watertown, June 3, 1781,

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