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BUREAU OF ENGINEERING

The following described records are in storage at the navy yard, Washington, D. C., and are duplicates of copies on file in the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts and elsewhere:

196 packages contracts, Supplies, and Accounts, 1916 to 1921.

31 packages contracts, bureau orders, 1914 to June, 1926.

21 packages contracts, Navy orders July, 1917, to November, 1920.

91 packages contracts, Navy pay office, 1915 to June, 1926.

246 packages requisitions, ships, navy yards, and stations, 1921 to 1926. Same for bureau, 1905 to 1926.

100 packages schedules, Supplies and Accounts, 1905 to 1926.

65 packages fuel-oil reports, 1918 to 1920.

Monthly report of unfinished inspection work, 1920 to 1924.
Test of steel forgings, 1918 and 1919.

Transcript of bids, 1900 to 1910.

New construction, scout cruisers Nos. 7, 8, 9, to 13, various ships and submarines, 1917 to 1924.

H. E. YARNELL, Chief of Bureau.

RECORD DIVISION, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY

Navy yard division copies of shore station monthly reports of expenditures and monthly expense statements for the fiscal years 1925 and 1926.

NAVY YARD DIVISION

Correspondence consisting of first indorsements and memorandums pertaining to action taken on manufacture requests between the division and the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, dated from May 1924, to December 1928 (9 cases). R. S. HAGGART, (By direction).

The SECRETARY OF THE NAVY,

CHARLES T. OGLE,
Chief Record Division.

Washington, D. C.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, Washington, January 19, 1981.

SIR: In reply to your communication of January 13, transmitting samples of useless papers of the Office of Naval Records and Library, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Bureau of Engineering, record division, and navy yard division, which the department wishes to destroy under the terms of the executive order of March 16, 1912.

The matter has had the attention of the Chief of the Division of Manuscripts, who now reports that these samples seem to indicate no material that needs to be preserved on account of any historical interest. The samples are therefore returned herewith.

Very respectfully,

HERBERT PUTNAM, Librarian.

FEBRUARY 14, 1931.

The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to report the disposition of useless papers in the files of navy yards, naval stations, etc., during the calendar year 1930, in accordance with authority granted by the Secretary of the Navy, under the provisions of an act of Congress approved March 4, 1915 (38 Stat. 929-930), as follows:

1. Naval torpedo station, Alexandria, Va.: Old records of accounting department, consisting of duplicate completed work reports, duplicate job orders, capitulations of cost charges, etc., prior to July 1, 1923, transferred to the Washington Navy Yard and sold as waste paper to the Washington Paper Stock Co.

under General Supply Committee contract, the proceeds of which, amounting to $4.92, were deposited to the credit of "Miscellaneous receipts.'

""

2. United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.: Old supply department records for period 1897 to 1914, consisting of open purchase requisitions, stub requisitions, inspection calls and shipping papers, destroyed.

3. Disbursing office, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.: Retained copies of fiscal returns and records of the disbursing office (for period ending December 31, 1923), United States Naval Academy (for period January 1, 1925, to September 30, 1925), and of the Destroyer Division 34 B. F. (for period May 1, 1926, to June 30, 1928), destroyed.

4. Navy yard, Boston, Mass.: Obsolete requisitions and shipment requests from other yards and stations for the fiscal year 1926, sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $31.36, were deposited with the disbursing officer of the yard to the credit of "Miscellaneous receipts;" accounting department records consisting of monthly transfer statements, expenditure invoices, store invoices, balance sheets, labor rolls, etc., for the period July 1, 1922, to December 31, 1926, sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $50.53, were deposited with the disbursing officer of the yard to the credit of "Naval working fund;" accumulations of retained vouchers (old papers and cash books) in files of disbursing officer, sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $4.40, were deposited with the disbursing officer of the yard to the credit of "Naval working fund."

5. Naval supply depot, Brooklyn, N. Y.: Old records pertaining to the accounting department, the provisions and clothing administration, and the supply department (issue division, procurement division, receivers section, shipping division, and survey division) for the fiscal year 1926 and prior years, sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $158.31, were taken up in the account of Lieut. J. H. E. Everette, S. C., United States Navy, naval supply depot, as a credit to "Naval working fund;" old records for the fiscal year 1927 pertaining to the accounting department, the provisions and clothing administration, and the supply department (issue division, receivers section, shipping division, and survey division), sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amount

to $18.50 were taken up in the account of Lieut. J. H. E. United States Navy, naval supply depot, as a credit to "Naval working fund."

6. Office of inspector of machinery, United States Navy, Camden, N. J.: Obsolete plans and records of certain United States naval vessels built at the plant of the American Brown-Boveri Electric Corporation or its predecessors, consisting of drawings, booklet plans of machinery, reports of trials, correspondence, etc., destroyed.

7. Navy yard, Charleston, S. C.: Old files of Accounting Office, two years old and over, consisting of expenditure invoices, store invoices, vouchers, public bills, shop tally cards, overtime authority, stub requisitions, time chits, etc., destroyed.

8. Office of inspector of naval material, Chicago, Ill.: Files of copies of completed contracts, two years old and over, concerning which no question are at issue, destroyed.

9. Ninth naval district, Great Lakes, Ill.: Obsolete files, two years old and over, consisting principally of retained disbursing papers, such as rough pay rolls, retained vouchers, check records, correspondence, copies of public bills, etc., destroyed.

10. Naval operating base, Hampton Roads, Va.: Old records of submarine base, two years old and over, consisting of manuals, deck logs, smooth logs, correspondence, etc., destroyed; naval supply depot, correspondence files, equipage account records and plans pertaining to submarines L-5 to L-8, inclusive, two years old and over, destroyed; old records of naval supply depot consisting of open purchase requisitions, inspection calls and public bills, five years old and over, destroyed.

11. Office of inspector of naval material, Hartford, Conn.: Inspection files for the years 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, and 1927, consisting principally of completed contracts, navy yard requisitions and orders, and shipping_reports, destroyed.

12. United States Navy recruiting station, Indianapolis, Ind.: Correspondence files dated prior to fiscal year 1928, destroyed.

13. Navy yard, Mare Island, Calif.: Certain plans of U. S. S. Salem, Frederick, New Orleans, and Albany, which vessels have been stricken from the Navy Register, destroyed; old records and files of Supply Department for the fiscal year 1928 and prior years consisting of schedules, ship and station requisitions, bureau shipment orders, expenditure invoices, shipment ready reports, inspection calls, open purchase requisitions, surveys, etc., destroyed.

14. Office of inspector of Navy material, Munhall, Pa.: Old files, two years old and over, sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $8.80, were forwarded to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, Navy Department, for deposit in the Treasury to the credit of "Miscellaneous receipts.

15. United States naval training station, Newport, R. I.: Old records of supply and accounting departments for dates up to and including the fiscal year 1926, consisting of requisitions, public bills, inspection calls, stock records, etc., sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $6.20, were deposited with the Treasurer of the United States to the credit of "General account of advances."

16. Navy yard, New York, N. Y.: Old records, logs, books, etc., pertaining to the U. S. S. Pueblo, which vessel was placed out of commission in 1927, s old as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $0.64, were deposited with the disbursing officer of the yard to the credit of "Miscellaneous receipts;" old records of the supply department, consisting of requisitions, shipment orders, copies of bureau schedules, shipment requests, manufacture requests, incoming invoices, and outgoing invoices, pertaining to the fiscal years 1925 to 1927, inclusive, and correspondence pertaining to the fiscal year 1920, sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $46.92, were deposited with the disbursing officer of the yard to the credit of "Miscellaneous receipts;" two cases of blue prints pertaining to the U. S. S. Pueblo, which vessel was placed out of commission in 1927, destroyed.

17. United States Navy recruiting inspector, northeastern recruiting division, New York, N. Y.: Accumulation of papers, 2 years old and over, not needed or useful in the transaction of current business and without permanent value or historical interest, destroyed.

18. Navy yard, Philadelphia, Pa.: Industrial department route pockets of completed job orders, 3 years old and over, destroyed.

19. Navy yard, Portsmouth, N. H.: Excess engineering allowance lists pertaining to the U. S. S. Bushnell, U. S. S. Camden, and other naval vessels and old supply and accounting department records prior to the fiscal year 1927, consisting of schedules, copies of public bills, rejected bids, invoices, bills of lading, leave cards, authority for Sunday and holiday work, etc., sold as waste paper, the proceeds of which, amounting to $36.50, were deposited with the yard disbursing officer to the credit of "Miscellaneous receipts;" certain old plans of the U. S. S. Des Moines, which vessel has been stricken from the Navy Register, destroyed.

20. Navy yard, Puget Sound, Wash.: Certain old records, books, rough logs, blue prints, and letter files of naval vessels, etc., no longer in service, destroyed; construction and repair and engineering plans and blue prints of the U. Š. S. Helori, Huron, Frederick, Charleston, Charlotte, and Missoula, which vessels have been stricken from the Navy list, destroyed.

21. United States Navy recruiting station, Raleigh, N. C.: Records and files prior to January 1, 1928, destroyed.

22. Naval supply depot, naval operating base, San Diego, Calif.: Old records, 2 years old and over, consisting of inspection calls, copies of public bills, ships requisitions. and bills of lading, etc., destroyed; old daily time ticket forms accumulated prior to the year 1927, destroyed; retained files of decommissioned submarine base, San Pedro, Calif., consisting of requisitions and orders and miscellaneous records for 1920, 1921, 1922, and 1923, destroyed; retained copies of returns of former disbursing officers of the eleventh naval district and naval operating base, San Diego, Calif., consisting of pay rolls, accounts current, requisitions, orders, public bills, check records, and other subsidiary vouchers, destroyed; reports of expenditures (S. & A. Form 280) for the fiscal years 1923, 1924, 1925, and 1926, destroyed; old records and papers up to and including the fiscal year 1927 consisting of requisitions, purchase orders, copies of inspection calls and public vouchers, etc., destroyed.

23. United States Navy purchasing office, San Francisco, Calif.: Files and records for fiscal years 1916 to 1927, inclusive, consisting of office copies of bids, requisitions, public vouchers, abstracts of expenditures, and duplicates of issued checks, destroyed.

24. Office of inspector of naval material, Seattle, Wash.: Useless records and files consisting of individual inspections from April, 1924, to January 1, 1928, and including a small lot of papers from the office of the inspector of machinery, Tacoma, Wash., discontinued, destroyed.

Very respectfully,

C. F. ADAMS, Secretary of the Navy.

DEPORTATION OF ALIEN SEAMEN

FEBRUARY 28, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union and ordered to be printed

REPORT

[To accompany S. 202]

Mr. SCHNEIDER, from the Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, submitted the following

The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred S. 202, providing for the deportation of certain alien seamen and for other purposes, having had the same under consideration and having amended the same for the purpose of perfecting the text report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass as amended.

On page 1, line 4, strike out the date "1926" and insert "1931". On page 4, line 1, strike out all after the word "any" to and including the word "belongs" on the same page, line 7, and insert the following:

sovereign nations may freely bring any excluded citizen or subject of such nation or any person not racially excluded who is a bona fide seaman as a member of the vessel's crew, exclusive, however, of any citizen, subject, or inhabitant of any colony, dependency, or mandate who is racially excluded from coming to the United States as an immigrant.

On page 4, lines 11 and 12, strike out the words " as a passenger on a vessel other than that on which brought."

On page 4, line 16, strike out the date "1928' 'and insert "1931". The first and fourth amendment simply correct dates.

The purpose of the second amendment is purely to clarify the text without in any way changing its meaning or purpose.

The purpose of the third amendment is to make deportation in certain instances less costly to the offending ship by arranging the deportation of the person on the first vessel available after the case is disposed of without waiting for a passenger vessel, thus reducing maintenance and deportation charges against the offending vessel.

Since the first quota law was adopted in 1921 more than 500,000 immigrants have unlawfully entered the United States disguised as seamen. This violation of our immigration laws can not be prevented

except through a rigid examination of the vessel's crew at quarantine prior to official entry at the customhouse. Such examination will be practically without cost because the crew has to be examined for sickness under existing laws.

Aliens who under existing laws can not come to the United States as immigrants will need no examination beyond the determination of their race. Such inadmissibles and those adjudicated to be mala fide seamen (claiming to be seamen when in fact they are immigrants) will be delivered to the immigration detention station by the master of the ship under penalty of $1,000 under existing immigration laws, which penalty is not reducible. Such delivery, the cost of detention, and the cost of deportation will be borne by the ship by which they were brought. At the present time the deportation of those who get ashore and are captured is now at the expense of the United States and the greatest objection from the foreign shipping interests to the act is that the cost of detention and deportation will fall on the offending vessel instead of upon the United States. Hence, also, the effort to reduce such cost by inserting the third amendment.

It has been charged that there is discrimination in the act, but such charges have never been established and can not be, because the law applies equally to American-flag ships and to foreign-flag ships. The act does not offend against any treaty. The State Department admits that the act will not violate any treaty and that it is not against comity. The protests which have come from foreign nations rest upon the claim that the act will be harsh, costly, and inconvenient.

The act has passed the Senate on two occasions. When it was passed the last time on April 14, 1930, it was held up on a motion to reconsider. The motion to reconsider was acted upon February 20, 1931, and after debate the motion was rejected.

The two reports from the Senate Committee on Immigration the first dated June 9, 1926, No. 1069, of the Sixty-ninth Congress, and the second dated May 3, 1928, No. 1037, of the Seventieth Congress have not been incorporated herein because it was thought unneces

sary.

This is a remedial statute. It is not claimed that it will absolutely prevent entering of inadmissibles but it will reduce a smoothly flowing river into a rippling brook.

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