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$3,700 inserted by the Senate for per diem field workers for Americanization instruction; appropriates $834,670, as proposed by the Senate, instead of $833,270, as proposed by the House, for personal services for care of buildings and grounds; appropriates $202,890 for furnishing and equipping new school buildings, instead of $171,000, as proposed by the House, and $218,654, as proposed by the Senate, the additions to the House total consisting of amounts for the Woodridge, Murch, and the new school at Kalmia Road, not included in the House bill, and compromise amounts on items of the House bill increased by the Senate; makes $200,000, as proposed by the Senate, instead of $100,000, as proposed by the House, of certain unexpended balances of school-building appropriations available during 1932 for the improvement of grounds surrounding school buildings; strikes out the increase of $10,000 proposed by the Senate for construction of an addition to the Woodridge School; strikes out the increase of $10,000 proposed by the Senate for the addition to the Murch School; makes $120,000 available, as proposed by the Senate, for an 8-room addition to the Janney School; appropriates $490,000, as proposed by the Senate, instead of $530,000, as proposed by the House, for school building and playground sites and strikes out the authority in the House bill for the purchase of a site in the vicinity of the Keene School; and strikes out the paragraph inserted by the Senate making the appropriation for 1931 for the purchase of a site for an 8-room building west of Connecticut Avenue and south of Jenifer Street available for the purchase of a site for such a building west of Connecticut Avenue and south of Military Road.

No. 47: Strikes out the increase of $5,000 inserted by the Senate for a site for a fire house in the vicinity of Twelfth and Rhode Island Avenue NE.

Nos. 48 and 49, relating to the Board of Public Welfare: Increases the House appropriation for personal services from $112,700 to $114,500, as proposed by the Senate, and increases the appropriation of the House for home care for dependent children from $138,280 to $153,280, as proposed by the Senate.

Nos. 50 and 51, relating to the workhouse and reformatory: Continues available during the fiscal year 1932, $60,000, as proposed by the Senate, instead of $12,000, as proposed by the House, out of the 1931 appropriation for power system and water supply.

No. 52: Strikes out the increase of $3,800, proposed by the Senate, for personal services at the Tuberculosis Hospital.

No. 53: Makes a technical correction in the text of the bill under Gallinger Hospital.

No. 54: Makes immediately available $5,000 of the appropriation for construction of dormitories and school building facilities at the Industrial Home School for Colored Children.

Nos. 55, 56, 57, and 58, relating to public buildings and public parks: Appropriates $853,900 for general expenses instead of $816,900, as proposed by the House, and $873,900, as proposed by the Senate, in order to provide $37,000 for grading and improving the roadway of Rock Creek Park to the District line, and eliminates $20,000 for a recreational center in the Manor Park section; appropriates $180,885 for salaries of park police, as proposed by the House, instead of $193,135, as proposed by the Senate, and strikes out the increase of

$1,045 inserted by the Senate for miscellaneous expenses of the park police.

No. 59: Increases the appropriation for the National Zoological Park by $4,500, as proposed by the Senate.

Nos. 60 and 61: Makes the appropriation for the construction of a water reservoir in Fort Stanton Park immediately available as proposed by the Senate and makes a technical correction in the paragraph.

DISAGREEMENT

No. 36, relating to the underage kindergarten in the Webster School: The managers on the part of the House will recommend concurrence in the Senate amendment with an amendment.

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FEBRUARY 20, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. MCSWAIN, from the Committee on Military affairs, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 7505]

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 7505) to authorize the construction of a sea wall at Fort Randolph, Panama Canal, introduced by Mr. James of Michigan at the request of the War Department, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

The sea wall required at Fort Randolph is not of very heavy construction because of the fact that there are coral reefs out some distance from the shore which break the force of the waves, but the waves that do come into the shore at Fort Randolph cause erosion. This erosion has almost reached the service road in the rear of the officers' quarters and has already threatened the operating position of one of the searchlights. Hearings have been held on this measure by your committee.

Chairman CoMMITTEE on Military AFFAIRS,

The letter from the Secretary of War requesting the enactment of this legislation is as follows:

OCTOBER 11, 1929.

House of Representatives.

Dear Mr. CHAIRMAN: It is requested that the following draft of a bill be introduced and enacted into law:

"A BILL To authorize the construction of a sea wall at Fort Randolph, Panama Canal

"Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of War is hereby authorized to provide for the construction of a sea wall along the water front of Fort Randolph in the Panama Canal Zone for the protection of United States property, and the sum of $84,000 is hereby authorized to be appropriated for such purpose. which sum shall remain available until expended."

There are no applicable provisions of existing law.

The shore line of the part of the reservation along which it is now proposed to construct a sea wall is exposed to the open sea on the windward side of the reservation during certain seasons of the year. When storms and heavy winds emanate from the Atlantic side, the wave action is severe and causes considerable erosion. This erosion, if allowed to continue, will eventually reach the parapets. The operating position of one of the searchlights is already threatened. Also, the continued erosion will ultimately result in undermining the row of officers' quarters. It is therefore of great importance that such erosion be checked without delay.

If any additional information is desired from the War Department, I shall be pleased to furnish it. Should hearings be held upon the proposed legislation, suitable witnesses will be designated to appear.

The proposed legislation has been submitted to the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, who advises that it is not in conflict with the financial program of the President.

Sincerely yours,

O

PATRICK J. HURLEY,
Acting Secretary of War.

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