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who would not be chargeable to the quota if there were a quota for Mexico) were issued visas in December, 1930, as compared with 2,569 in December, 1928 (the last corresponding normal month before stricter enforcement began), a decrease of 92 per cent. The 217 nonquota visas issued in Mexico in December, 1930, show an increase of 28 visas when compared with the 189 visas issued in November of the current year.

GENERAL STATEMENT

The table of quota visa statistics for the month of December, 1930, represents reductions in visas issued to immigrants by consular officers during the third month of the enforcement of the "likely to become a public charge" provision of the immigration act of 1917, in the light of present unemployment in the United States. This policy was put into effect in October, 1930, following the announcement in this regard by the President on September 8, 1930, based on a report presented, at his request, by the State Department.

In this connection, consular officers have been informed that, in view of the serious unemployment which exists in the United States, particular care should be taken before issuing immigration visas to determine whether the applicants may become public charges. If any alien, upon whom the burden of establishing admissibility is placed by section 23 of the immigration act of 1924, should be unable to establish that he is not likely to become a public charge, the consular officer to whom he may have applied for a visa would have no other choice under section 2 (f) of the immigration act of 1924 than to refuse a visa. Section 2(f) of the act cited provides in part that

"No immigration visa shall be issued to an immigrant if it appears to the consular officer * * * that the immigrant is inadmissible to the United States under the immigration laws * * * nor shall such immigration visa be issued if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that the immigrant is inadmissible to the United States under the immigration laws."

EXHIBIT "D"

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
February 14, 1931.

For the press.

Immigration visa statistics.On the basis of the following figures, both quota and nonquota, it is estimated that 135,000 aliens who would have come into this country during the quota year ended June 30, 1931, will not receive visas.

Quota statistics.2-Reports from American consular officers assigned to 21 countries whose annual quotas represent 148,466 of the total quota of 153,714, indicate that of the possible portion of the monthly 10 per cent of the total quotas, which 10 per cent equals 14,846, only 611 visas were issued to nonpreference aliens as compared to 780 in December. This means that there was an underissue in January of 13,451 numbers which were available for issue to such applicants from those countries. In other words there was an underissue of 96 per cent of numbers to this class of aliens who would normally have received visas during that month.

The underissue of the possible monthly 10 per cent of the above quotas amounting to 14,846 is 91 per cent if the visas issued to aliens entitled by law to preference as well as those classifiable as nonpreference aliens is taken into consideration.

The consuls of the United States in the enforcement of existing provisions of law in the light of present economic conditions have brought about the above results without arbitrary rejections of applicants.

Incomplete reports received to date from the remaining countries whose annual quotas amount to 5,248 and whose quotas are not restricted to a 10 per cent monthly issue indicate that only 55 numbers were issued during the month of January.

! Indicating continued and further reduction in visas issued to immigrants during January, 1931. With the exception of most of the countries in the Western Hemisphere and of certain parts of the Far East known as the Asiatic barred zone, all countries in the world are quota countries. Of a total quota of 153,714 visas, 150,414 are allotted to Europe alone.

Immigration quota visa statistics, January, 1981, countries with quotas of 300 01

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The figures given under column 9 represent the percentage of nonpreference visas issued as compared to the monthly 10 per cent ratio after reduction of the preference cases listed under columns 2, 3, and The figures under column 10 represent the corresponding underissue of visas.

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NOTE.-The above figures represent visas actually reported as issued under each quota. In some instances reports on other visas for which quota numbers have been allotted to distant consulates are received by the quota control officers only after the end of the month for which allotted. The figures given for visas issued at the end of a given month are therefore in some cases provisional in character and are slightly less than the total obtained at a later date.

Nonquota statistics. The two countries which have furnished the volume of nonquota immigrants to this country are Canada and Mexico which contributed 89 per cent or 70 and 19 per cent respectively of the total of 61,504 visas reported as issued to nonquota aliens during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1930. Consular officers in Mexico initiated stricter enforcement in that country in February, 1929, and in Canada in April, 1930. Reports received for the month of January indicate a continued decrease in visas issued in these two countries.

Canada. Reports received from Canada indicate that only 483 nonquota visas were issued in January, 1931 (which figure includes unmarried minor children, the wives or the husbands of American citizens married prior to June 1, 1928, as well as certain professors, ministers, students, and previous lawful residents of the United States who would not be chargeable to the quota if there were a quota for Canada) as compared with 2,115 visas issued during the same month in 1930, which represents a reduction in visas issued during this period of 77 per cent. The 483 nonquota visas issued in Canada in January show a reduction of 120 visas issued when compared with 603 visas issued in December of the current fiscal year (a further reduction of 20 per cent).

Mexico. Only 157 Mexicans (which figure includes unmarried minor children, the wives or the husbands of American citizens married prior to June 1, 1928, as well as certain professors, ministers, students, and previous lawful residents of the United States who would not be chargeable to the quota if there were a quota tor Mexico) were issued visas in January, 1931, as compared with 2,799 in January, 1929, (the last corresponding normal month before stricter enforcement began)

The nonquota countries are in North, Central, and South America.

or a decrease of 94 per cent. The 157 nonquota visas issued in Mexico in January, 1931, show a decrease of 60 visas when compared with the 217 visas issued in December of the current fiscal year.

The table of quota visa statistics for the month of January, 1931, represents reductions in visas issued to immigrants by consular officers during the fourth month of the enforcement of the "likely to become a public charge" provision of the immigration act of 1917, in the light of present unemployment in the United States. This policy was put into effect in October, 1930, following the announcement in this regard by the President on September 8, 1930, based on a report presented, at his request, by the State Department.

In this connection, consular officers have been informed that, in view of the serious unemployment which exists in the United States particular care should be taken before issuing immigration visas to determine whether the applicants may become public charges. If any alien, upon whom the burden of establishing admissibility is placed by section 23 of the immigration act of 1924, should be unable to establish that he is not likely to become a public charge, the consular officer to whom he may have applied for a visa would have no other choice under section 2(f) of the immigration act of 1924 than to refuse a visa. Section 2(f) of the act cited provides in part that:

"No immigration visa shall be issued to an immigrant if it appears to the consular officer * * * that the immigrant is inadmissible to the United States under the immigration laws * * * nor shall such immigration visa be issued if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that the immigrant is inadmissible to the United States under the immigration laws."

MINORITY VIEW OF MR. GIBSON

This resolution practically drops from the present law the human factor in that it puts the alien fathers and mothers of many American citizens back years on their quota lists. These fathers and mothers have been anxiously waiting for the time when they would be called to rejoin their children in this country. I fail to see the justice of any legislation that defers that time. Every law to be effective must have the human element in its administrative features. This proposal does not come up to that standard.

The resolution would practically close the doors to immigration from Canada. Our relations with the Dominion have been friendly through the years of the past and to the extent that we stand before the world as an example of peaceful relations through mutual understandings. The northern counties of Vermont are peopled with many splendid citizens who came from Canada. I fear that practically complete restriction will serve to disturb that spirit of friendship and mutual cooperation that has characterized our relations.

ERNEST W. GIBSON.

34

MINORITY VIEWS OF MR. COOKE

I an opposed to House Joint Resolution 500 because I believe that, under the claim of duress of economic depression, an effort is being made to effect total exclusion of immigration, which may be interpreted to be a definition of the future policy of this Government on that subject. Exclusion may be a desirable policy for adoption, but the subject embraces so many considerations that it should be undertaken only after thorough consideration and discussion by the Congress, with ample opportunity afforded for the expression of opinion by the public at large. The consular agents of the Government, acting under instructions from the Department of State, have during the past five months compelled strict adherence to the provisions of the present law requiring the applicant immigrant to show that he or she is not liable upon admission to become a public charge and have reduced immigration below the quota allowances more than 90 per cent. This method is effective in procuring the results desired to be obtained; possesses the desirable quality of flexibility and can not be deemed to be the expression of a national policy; it gives no offense to the countries whose nationals are involved. When, by degrees, prosperity is being restored, drastic requirements can be gradually relaxed until the normal economic condition is again arrived at. The prosperity and well-being of the United States are, to a degree, dependent upon cordial commercial and social relations with the civilized countries of the world. Friendliness between nations constitutes a firmer basis for flourishing trade relations than cheapness in price.

In the present chaotic conditions prevailing in the economic world no disturbance should be permitted to the recovery of our equilibrium. The passage of a bill practically excluding immigration to this country can too easily be construed as an indication of future policy and its adverse reception by the nations might disturb the balance we are seeking to recover. The measures being made effective by the State Department are in my opinion, adequate to the exigencies of the situation.

Section 2 of the bill is economically and socially unsound. In addition the good faith and honor of the Government are involved. No barrier should be raised to the reuniting of the families of American citizens nor the families of aliens resident in this country. Wives and minor children constitute a great majority of this class. Hundreds of millions of dollars, money earned in the United States, is being sent abroad annually for their support. Few of them, when admitted, would become competitors in the American labor market. Their admission would terminate the transfer of this great wealth abroad and permit the establishment here of the home and family of the immigrant imparting stability and permanence to his residence in the land of his

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