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CENTRAL UNION MISSION.

RETURN A.-Administration.
Name of institution or association: Central Union Mission,

Location of institution or office of association: 622 Louisiana avenue, and 10 branches in different parts of the city.

Date of organization: August 19, 1884.
Date of incorporation: January 7, 1887.

Date of approval of act under which incorporated : General law for religious organizations.

E. ent of lands occupied : 60 by 95 feet on Louisiana avenue; one branch owned, 50 by 100 feet.

Value of lands occupied: $60,000 for Louisiana avenue property; $1,000 for one branch.

In whom is the title to the lands: Central Union Mission.

Value of buildings and other improvements, in detail: Louisiana avenue property, $30,000; one branch, $1,500; other property, $5,000.

Amount of Congressional appropriations for lands: Nothing.

Amount of Congressional appropriations for buildings and other improvements: Nothing.

Amount of private gifts of buildings or money expended for buildings and other improvements: About $60,000 for lands and buildings.

Amount of endowment: Nothing.

RETURN B.-Population,

The mission is a religious organization, interdenominational, its object being to preach the gospel to the neglected classes. Incidentally, it has an industrial department, which is entirely self-supporting. It has lodging accommodations for about 300. It has a wood yard for the employment of men and a laundry for the employment of women.

RETURN C.-Income and expenditure for 1896.*

Income from Congressional appropriations: $250, first quarterly payment for year ending November, 1896.

Income from other public sources, stating such sources: Commissioners of the District, $250; Board of Children's Guardians for board of children, $2,235.41.

Income from private gifts: $953.52.
Income from endowment: None.

Income from all other sources, stating sources: Payment in part for board from working boys, $352.50; bazaar, 8350.10.

Total income: $4,910.95.

Amount of indebtedness: None, except on an old building, the interest of which is virtually met by the rent of the same.

* I find it difficult to present the financial statement (Return C) in the forin desired, and I will forward the last annual report, which shows the treasurer's report.

Amount expended on repairs and new steam-heating works, etc., say, $2,000.

Amount expended on new gymnasium, say, $5,500.

Amount paid for salaries, in detail: Superintendent, $480; assistants, and wages of servants, $670.51.

Amount paid for supplies: $1,392.04.

All other expenses, in detail: Clothing, $331.81; coal, $222.78; gas, $157.25; electric light, $2.59; beds, etc., $188.05; house furnishing and incidentals, $290.02; water rent, $16,42; taxes, $17.92; loan, $285.

Total cost of maintenance: $1,054.42.

TEMPORARY HOME FOR EX-UNION SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.

RETURN A.-Administration.

Name of institution or association: Temporary Home for Ex-Union Soldiers and Sailors.

Location of institution or office of association: 305 Missouri avenue VW.

Date of organization: September 1, 1888.
Date of incorporation: October 26, 1888.
Extent of lands occupied : None; house is rented.

RETURN B.-Population.
Number of inmates January 1, 1896: 32.
Number admitted during the year 1996: 895,
Total number in institution January 1, 1897: 29.
Highest number accommodated at any one time: 35.

Are the privileges of the institution or association confined to bona fide residents of the District of Columbia? No.

What entrance conditions as to age, color, or religious affiliation? None.

What supervision is exercised over expenditures or management by public officers ? All bills are sent to superintendent of charities.

Under the auspices of what religious denomination is the institution conducted ? None.

RETURN 0.-Income and expenditure for 1896.

Income from Congressional appropriations: $2,500. Income from private gifts: $20. Income from all other sources, stating such sources: Fund on hand, $179.71.

Total income: $2,699.71. Amount of indebtedness: December, 1895, bills, $225.20. Amount expended on repairs: Stove, $8; plumbing, $t; total, $12. Amount paid for salaries, in detail: Superintendent, $300; janitor, $60; cook, $120; laundress, $48; treasurer, $25; in all, $553.

Amount paid for supplies: $1,797.74.

All other expenses, in detail: Crockery, $9.60; bedding, $ 46,20; stove hardware, $7.26; matting, $10.65; treasury bond, $12.50; total, $86.21.

Total cost of maintenance: $2,699.71.

MISCELLANEOUS.

FIRST MISSION SCHOOL OF COOKERY.

RETURN A.-Administration.

Name of institution or association: First Mission School of Cookery and Housework.

Location of institution or oftice of association: 1228 N street NW., Washington, D. C.

Date of organization: December 5, 1879.
Date of incorporation: It has not been incorporated.
Copy of charter, and amendments thereto: We have none.

Extent of lands occupied : It occupies a rented house, shared with other schools.

Amount of Congressional appropriations for lands: Nothing has been received.

Amount of Congressional appropriations for buildings and other improvements: Nothing.

Amount of private gifts of lands or money expended for lands: No gifts have been expended.

Amount of private gifts of buildings or money expended for buildings and other improvements: None. Amount of endowment: It has no endowment.

RETURN B.-Population. Are the privileges of the institution or association confined to bona fide residents of the District of Columbia ? We have taken, so far, children from the District of Columbia.

What entrance conditions as to age, color, sex, or religious atliliation? They must be girls, between 10 and 16 years of age; there is no distinction in regard to color or religion.

What supervision is exercised over expenditures or management by public officers? None.

Under the auspices of what religious denomination is the institution conducted? The school is entirely unsectarian and independent of any other association.

RETURN C.-Income and expenditure for 1896. Income from Congressional appropriations: No income has been received.

Income from other public sources, stating such sources: $198.46 from the Mission Employment Burean.

Income from private gifts: $653.
Income from endowment: Nothing.

Income from all other sources, stating such sources: $22 from a lecture, and $3 from sale of a gas stove.

Total income: $876,46.

Amount of indebtedness: For the year 1896 it was $241.76; whole amount of indebtedness, $350.

Amount paid for interest: Nothing.
Amount expended on lands: Nothing.

Amount expended on repairs: The landlord makes the repairs.
Amount expended on enlargement: Nothing.

Amount paid for salaries, in detail: Superintendent, $300; teacher, $160; janitress and servant, $120.

Amount paid for supplies: $63.90.

All other expenses, in detail: For gas, $28; fuel, $60; kitchen ware, $14.07; gas stove, $13.50; advertisements, $2; clearing snow, taking ashes, etc., $13.75.

Total cost of maintenance: $1,158.22.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 27, 1897. Hon. JAMES MCMILLAN.

DEAR SIR: If I have not rightly answered the questions asked in regard to the First Mission School of Cookery, I hope that it will be excused as the school is quite differently organized from other institutions and has always occupied a rented house, and this made it a little difficult to answer them. We have never been able to purchase a building, because all the money which we have had has been needed to carry out the object for which the school was established, viz, the improve. ment of the homes of the poor by teaching them to make the best use of what they have, and also by helping them to become self-supporting members of society.

As you kindly ask for information in regard to the charities of the District, I will say that the value of these preventive charities is more and more recognized and appreciated. This school has done a large and important work and is widely known and regarded with great interest in many other cities as being the first one of its kind in this country. It has now been carried on for seventeen years, and hundreds of poor girls have been benefited by its work. It has cooperated with the Associated Charities and other institutions by taking girls whom they recommend, and can do great good at a moderate expense, as it teaches the girls without taking them from their own homes, and therefore does not incur the expense of their support. Such a school will always be needed because it can teach more branches of domestic and household work than can ever be taught in the public schools.

It receives between $200 and $300 a year from the Mission Employment Bureani, which is trying to help in solving the very difficult problem of domestic service; but except for this it is dependent on donations, many of these having been received from friends in other cities who have realized the excellence and importance of the work. Although there is a warm interest taken in it here also, the many and varied demands which are made on the community make it difficult to obtain even the moderate sum which is required, and there is always an uncertainty, which is very wearing and prevents our doing the work which we might do with a more steady income. If the school could receive even $600 annually from the funds which are appropriated for the poor of the District, it would be possible to obtain the remainder in donations, and it would surely be money well spent in helping them to help themselves; and visitors from other parts of our own country and from abroad have all been impressed with the economy and system shown in its management. I send a copy of the last report, which we have printed, and hope that the Mission School may receive your favor. able consideration and assistance. Very respectfully,

Mrs. ANNA L. WOODBURY, President.

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