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2. WEATHER, QUANTITY OF Rain, DIRECTION AND FORCE OF Winds.

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82 170 113 63 18 39 22 | 86 44 | 58 | 35 1.10 46.034

The coldest day in the year was the 21st of January, and the warmest the 21st of July.

XII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR NATCHEZ, Miss.

For 1843. Lat. 31° 34', Long. 91° 24' 42''; by Henry Tooley.

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6 A. M.

12 M.

P. M.

A. M.

12 M.

6 P. M.

Inches.

Rainy.
Snowy.

Jan., 48.2 56.6 57.4 29.909 29.913 29 913 50.8 54. 58.1 7.20 6 20
Feb. 45.1 51.2 54.9 29.700 29.865 29.800 47.1 56.8 55.5 3.70 4 20
Mar., 41.3 47.9 51.3 29.789 29.801 29.785 44.2 19.4 52.2 6.06 5 18 6 2
April, 63. 71.5 773 29.775 29.784 29.774 65.7 71.6 75.5 5.16 3 23 4
May, 9.376.9 81.7 29.777 29.793 29.797 72.5 80.6 83.7 2.16 7 18
June, 72.5 80. 84.2 29.808 29.790 29.764 74. 79.7 82.6 10.68 0 16 14
July, 75. 82.7 85.5 29.824 29.817 29.825 76.8 85.8 83.6 6.75 1 2010,
Aug., 73.8 81.1 83.9 29.528 29.843 29.821 73.3 80.381.9 2.78 1 21 9
Sept. 74.9 81.4 82.9 29.789 29.817 29.783 75.6 81.1 83.2 4.93 0 18 12
Oct., 158.4 65.3 68.1 29.850 29.853 29.799 60.4 66. 68.2 4.04 4 20 7
Nov., 56.7 61.8 64.3 29.852 29.863 29.843 58.1 62.2 61.5 11.24 0 18 12
Dec., 48.2 52.2 55.1 29.942 29.912 29.880 49.6 53.2 55.7 14.03 7 9 15
Mean, 60.7 67.3 70.5 29.520 29,839 29.857 62.368.3 70.4 78.67 38 221 104 2

Coldest, 23. 29. 40. Mar. 16. Barometer lowest, 29° 32', Mar. 27th.
Hottest, 75. 86. 92. July 16. Barometer highest, 30° 37', Dec. 13th.

Depth of rain the current year, in inches, 78.67
Mean for three previous years,

50.59 Days of rain the current year,

104 Mean for six previous years,

8972

XIII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR STEUBENVILLE, Ohio.
Lat. 40° 25' N., Long. 80° 41' 24" W. Elevation above tide water at Baltimore

670 feet. By Roswell Marsh.
I. TABLE FOR TEN YEARS. MEANS; 1833–1842, INCLUSIVE.

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SI Cloudy days.

January,
February,
March,
April,
May,
June,
July,
August,
September,
October,
November,
December,

Year,

30'4036 63 10 29.37 29.38 29.39 129.80 28.60 2 95 8 7 10 21 16 15 19 29 25 48 3 29.26 29.28 29.28 29.62 28.90 2 90 415 19 9 6 22 2132 29 51 5 29.32 29.34 29.32 29.65 28.55 3 75 5.11 21 10 10 20 43 52 73 24 29.34 29.36 29.35 29.62 28.95 3 34 11 4 18 12 5 25 50 62 82 34 29.40 29.43 29.40 29.68 29.10 3 10 11 .. 18 13 7 24 587774 91 37 29.38 29.40 29.39 29.70 29.15 5 20 12 1 19 11 21 9 61 83 79 95 5029.48 29.49 29.48 29.73 29.30 1 50 6.. 14 17 17 14 75 90 50 29.59 29,51 29.50 29 70 29.30 1 30 7

20 11 16 15 60 74 69 91 4029.49 29.50 29.51 29.75 29.10 6 95 / 12 19 11 14 16 4052 48 73 24 29.34 29.36 29.36 29.80 29.00 3 30 12 4 19 12 12 19 33 41 40 56 18 29.43 29.45 29.44 29.74 28.96 3 85 9 3 20 10 6 24 30 36 35 50 12 29.41 29.42 29.40 29.95 29.01 2 90 7 5 20 11 7 24 4255 52 95 3 29.40 29.41 29.40 29.95 28.55) 41 04 104/50 217 148 138/227

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XIV. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR BLOOMINGTON, IA.

For the Year 1843; by Mr. T. S. Parvin.

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January,
24.9 50-15 65 29.27 29.60 28.80.80 11

4 17 10 23
February,
13.3 45 -19 64 .38 .60 .80.80 14 10

20

3 16 12 March, 15.5 38 -10 48 .34 .60 .90 .70 19 10

6 18 1 18 13 April, 47.7 78 5 73 .33 .60 .80.80 17

11 12 5 14 16 May, 58.2 88 27 61 .31 .20 1.40 19

10 10 17

14 June, 67.7 90 40 50 .26

.50
.90 .60 15 411

10 10 20 10 July, 70.4 95 55 40 .41 .70 .10.60 25 6 6 5 8 14 4 24 7 August,

70.6 91 46 48 .39 .60 .20 .40 20 3 87 3 10 14 4 23 8 September, 61.5 92 45 47 .35 .70 .70 1.00 12 9 9 12 12 10 8 20 10 October, 42.1 84 12 72 .39 .60 .90 .70 20 3 S 4 4 2 6 9 14 16

15 November, 34 0 56 10 46 .38 .70 .20 1.50 7 16 7 5 6 3 9 14 4 24 6 December, 31.9 54 sl 46 .31 .80 29.00 .80 14 14 3 5 2 3 6 16 6 21 10 Year,

45.0 95 -19 114'29.34 29.63 29.62 1.01 193 96 76 65 26 31 91 164 79 236 129

.60

werwe

800 m Hg. Wind.

The warmest day in the year, was July 16th ; 83° 3' above 0.
The coldest day was February 6th; 6° 3' below 0.
The highest temperature, was July 15th ; 95° above 0.
The lowest temperature, was February 7th; 19° below 0.
Mean temperature for the year, 45° 06'.
Range of temperature, for the year, 114o.
Mississippi river opened, April 8th.

XV. FLOWERING OF FRUIT TREES.

Place.
Year. Peach. Cherry.

Apple.
Cambridge, Mass., 1844 April 27-30. April 27–30. May 4-12.
New Haven, Conn., 1844 April 25.

April 25. May 7. Perth Amboy, N. J., 1844 | April 15.

April 17. April 26. Trenton, N. J.,

1844 April 13. April 14. April 24. Lambertville, N. J., 1844 April 14. April 17. April 19. Philadelphia, Penn., 1844 April 8. April 11. April 14. Baltimore, Md., 1844

April 10. April 12. April 15. King Geo., C. H., Var, 1844 April 7. April 10. April 15. Augusta, Ga.,

1844 Feb. 26. Almond trees, Feb. 17. Natchez, Miss., 1844 Jan. 28.

Iarch 24. Columbus, Ohio, 1844 * April 10.

April 13. April 16. Madison, Wisc. Ter., 1844 ' April 15.

April 26.

* Twenty or thirty days later than usual.

XVI. FLOWERING OF PLANTS AT MARIETTA, Ohio,

For the Year 1843. By S. P. Hildreth, M. D. April 1st, crocus in bloom ; 2d, crown imperial, two inches high ; 3d, snow fell two inches deep; 4th, blackbird and martin appear ; 8th, snowdrop in bloom; 14th, Hepatica triloba; 19th, early hyacinth; 20th, Aronia botryapium, or Juneberry; 21st, crown imperial ; 22d, Sanguinaria Canadensis; 23d, hyacinth ; 24th, peach tree begins to open its flowers on the sunny side of hills, but not in low grounds ; 25th, wood anemone; 26th, fumitory and birthwort; 27th, peach in bloom generally — last year it opened on the 19th of March, a difference of thirty-eight days; 29th, plum in bloom. On the morning of the 25th, there was a frost, but not so hard as to injure the blossoms of the peach.

May 1st, pear and cherry in bloom; 5th, apple in blossom - last year it was open on the 2d of April, a difference of thirty-three days; a few tu, lips of the early varieties open ; 6th, red-bud in bloom — this fine flowering tree usually opens at the same time with the apple ; 7th, Cornus florida; Sth, white oak putting out its leaves — the old Indian rule for planting their corn, which was probably founded on ancient observation, that before that period, the earth was not sufficiently warmed for the corn to vegetate in a healthy manner; 9th, apple shedding its blossoms; 13th, quince tree in bloom; 16th, purple mulberry; 17th, Calceolaria lutea ; 18th, hickory ; 19th, black walnut shedding its arents; 22d, Ribes villo. sus; 24th, Acacia robinia - this is a very cautious tree, and never puts out its bloom till all danger from late frosts is past; 25th, Prunus Virgin. ianus; 27th, rose Acacia, in gardens; 30th, white Chinese peony.

The mean temperature for the summer months was 71°15, which is 30:71 above the summer of 1842. The amount of rain in these months, was only 7:45 inches, while in the former year it was 15-75 inches. June 2d, there was a smart frost in the morning, but not so hard as to destroy the young and tender fruit of pears, apples, &c., it being protected by the shelter, and by the radiation of caloric from the leaves. 7th, Osage orange in bloom; 8th, peas fit for the table — in ordinary years they are ready by the 20th of May. 9th, strawberries ripe; 11th, various hardy roses in bloom; 18th, Franklinia; 23d, cucumbers ready for eat. ing — grown in the open air, but protected when small by a box, like a hand glass ; 26th, Sambucus in bloom ; 27th, purple mulberry ripe ; 29th, red Antwerp raspberry and currant; July 1st, Catalpa in bloom. The ripening of the early summer fruits is not so much retarded by the ac. tion of a cold spring, as the blooming of flowers.

THE

AMERICAN ALMANAC,

FOR

1845.

PART II.

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