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LONGMAN AND CO.; J. M. RICHARDSON; HAMILTON AND CO.; SIMPKIN AND

co.; J. RODWELL; HOULSTON AND STONEMAN; G. LAWFORD; J. DOWDING ;
J. BUMPUS; COWIE AND CO. ; CAPES AND SON; SMITH, ELDER AND
co.; H. WASHBOURNE; H. G. BOHN; WALLER AND SON; J. THOMAS ;
L. BOOTH; W. J. CLEAVER; G. ROUTLEDGE; G. WILLIS ; AND TEGG
AND CO.

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LONDON:

GEORGE WOODPALL AND SON,

ANGEL COURT, SKINNER STREET.

CONTENTS.

AFFAIRS OF IRELAND.—Ministerial Measures—On the 25th of January Lord

John Russell brings forward the subject of Irish Distress at great length

in the House of Commons-He announces various Measures ; some of a

temporary, others of a permanent character-Debate on this occasion

Remarks of Mr. Bellew—The Bills are read a first time—The Marquis of

Lansdowne, on the same evening, makes a similar statement in the House

of Lords Mr. Roebuck puts questions to Lord John Russell respecting

the Amount of Public Moneys advanced for Irish Relief—Answer of Lord

John Russell—Bill for indemnifying the Government for the past Pro-

ceedings of the Irish Administration comes on for Second Reading on 1st

February—Mr. W. Williams opposes the progress of the Bill without suc-

cess-Debate upon the Bill is continued by Adjournment for two nights

- The Second Reading is carried without a Division-Lord John Russell

then moves the Second Reading of the Destitute Persons (Ireland) Bill to

make provision for the immediate Relief of the People—It is carried after

a short Discussion-On the Committal of the Bill Mr. O'Connell propounds

a Plan for relieving Irish Distress-Observations of Mr. Roebuck on the

Expenditure of the Government for this purpose-Debate on the Bill in

the House of Lords—Speeches of Lord Brougham, Lord Stanley, the Mar-

quis of Lansdowne, and other Peers—It passes the Second Reading, and

becomes Law-Permanent Measures—The New Irish Poor Law–Speech

of Lord John Russell on going into Committee on this Bill on the 12th

of March-Adjourned Debate-Speeches of Mr. Poulett Scrope, Sir Ben-

jamin Hall, Sir William Molesworth, Mr. Smith O'Brien, Mr. Gregory,

Mr. A. Hamilton, and other Members—Various Amendments are carried

in Committee-Debate on the Second Reading in the House of Lords

a 2

Irish Affairs continued-Lord George Bentinck's Plan for advances from

the Treasury in aid of Irish Railways-His Speech on bringing in the

Bill for that purpose, on the 4th of February-Speeches of Lord John

Russell, Mr. Roebuck, and other Members--Leave is given to bring in the

Bill—Debate on the Second Reading, protracted by three adjournments

- The Chancellor of the Exchequer moves that the Bill be read a second

time that day six months—Speeches of Mr. Hudson, Mr. Goulburn, Mr.

Disraeli, Sir Robert Peel, and Lord John Russell-The Bill is lost on a

Division, by 322 to 118—On the 26th of April the Chancellor of the Ex-

chequer proposes an Advance by Loan from the Treasury to certain Irish

Railways--Flis Speech on this occasion-Mr. Hume strongly objects to

the proposal-Lord George Bentinck taunts the Government with their

inconsistency in bringing

forward this Scheme after having opposed and

defeated his Bill for the same object--Further explanations of the Chan-

cellor of the Exchequer-Mr. Goulburn and Sir Robert Peel argue with

great force against the Measure-The vote is carried by 218 to 75-A

Bill for this purpose is brought in-On the motion for the Second Read-

ing, it is vigorously opposed by Sir William Molesworth, who moves its

rejection-Speeches of Nr. W. Williams, Lord John Russell, Mr. Roebuck,

Lord George Bentinck, Sir James Graham, Sir Charles Wood, Mr. Hume,

and Mr. Cardwell— The Second Reading is carried by 175 to 62, and the

Bill is finally passed—Plans of Emigration proposed for the Relief of

Irish Distress— The Earl of Lincoln moves, on the 1st of June, for an

Address to the Crown upon the subject of Colonization, with a view to

the advantage of Ireland-Debate upon this motion-Explanation of

Lord John Russell-The Address is agreed to-Lord Monteagle makes a

similar motion in the House of Lords on the same subject-Earl Grey, on

the part of the Government, agrees to the appointment of a Com-

mittee

[54

Chancellor of the Exchequer-His Statement on that occasion-Remarks

of Mr. Goulburn, Mr. Hume, Mr. Smith O'Brien, Lord George Bentinck,

and other Members—The Bills pass the Commons, but are strongly op-

posed in the House of Lords by Lord Stanley and other Peers—Lord

Stanley's Amendment is defeated by 37 to 25—The Budget-The Chan-

cellor of the Exchequer makes his financial Statement on the 22nd of

February–He proposes a Loan of Eight Millions in consequence of

the great outlay incurred in Ireland, but no increase of Taxation-

Speeches of Mr. Hume, Mr. Roebuck, Lord John Russell, Mr. Goul-

burn, Mr. Francis Baring, Sir R. Peel, and other Members—The Chan-

cellor of the Exchequer

a few days afterwards announces to the House

the terms on which he had contracted for the Loan-Mr. Hume and

Mr. W. Williams make some objections-Resolutions carried-Debate

on the Loan and on the Financial Position of the Country — Sir

Charles Wood makes a proposition for enabling Payments to be made

in advance on account of the new Loan upon allowance of Discount-

He also proposes to increase the Interest on Exchequer Bills-His two

Statements on the 7th and 10th of May-Speeches of Mr. Hume, Mr.

Masterman, Mr. Newdegate, Lord G. Bentinck, Mr. Cardwell, Mr. T.

Baring, Sir George Clerk, Mr. Disraeli, and Sir Robert Peel, who vindi-

cates the Policy of the recent Bank Charter Act—The Resolutions are

agreed to Motion by Mr. Ricardo for a Select Committee to inquire into

the operation of the Navigation Laws-His Speech on moving the ques-

tion-Mr. M. Gibson on the part of the Government assents to the Motion

-Mr. T. Liddell opposes it, together with Lord George Bentinck, Mr.

Hudson, Alderman Thompson, Mr. Disraeli, and Captain Harris-Sir R.

Peel advocates Inquiry --The Motion is supported by Lord John Russell,

Mr. La bouchere, Sir Walter James, and other Members-On a division it

is carried by 155 to 61

[78

CHAPTER Y.

Miscellaneous Measures--Bill for limiting the Hours of Labour in Factories;

brought in by Mr. Fielden-Mr. Hume opposes the Second Reading-
Various Members of the Government express different opinions on the

measure-Speech of the Chancellor of the Exchequer against the Bill-

The Second Reading is carried after much discussion, by 195 to 87—Op-

position to the Bill renewed in Committee-Mr. B. Escott moves its rejec-

tion-Speeches of Sir James Graham, Sir George Grey, Mr. Brotherton,

Mr. Ward, Lord Morpeth, Mr. M. Gibson, and Sir Robert Peel—The

Amendment is negatived by a majority of ninety-The Earl of Ellesmere

moves the Second Reading in the House of Lords-His speech, and that

of Lord Brougham, who moves that the Bill be read a second time that

day six months-The Bishop of London supports the Bill-After some

discussion the Amendment is negatived by 53 to 11–Limited Enlist-

ment-Mr. Fox Maule brings in a Bill for shortening the period of Ser-

vice in the Army-Sir Howard Douglas opposes the Bill—It is advocated

by Major Layard, Sir De Lacy Evans, and other Members—It is read a

Second Time-Further opposition and discussions in Committee-The

Bill passes the House of Commons

Earl Grey moves the Second Reading

in the Upper House-It is opposed by the Duke of Richmond, Lord Stan-

ley, Viscount Combermere, and Lord Brougham-Important speech of the

Duke of Wellington in favour of the Bill—The Second Reading is carried

by 108 to 94—Further discussions in Committee-An Amendment moved

by the Earl of Ellenborough is adopted-Public Education-Minutes of

the Educational Committee of Privy Council are laid before the House of

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