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TABLE OF TRIALS.

PAGE The Trial of SUSAN B. ANTHONY for Voting at a Congres

sional Election, New York, 1873 . . . . . . . . . . 1

The Trial of BEVERLY W. JONES, EDWIN P. MARSH and

WILLIAM B. HALL for Permitting Women to Vote, New
York, 1873 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54

The Trial of MATTHEWS F. WARD for the Murder of WIL

LIAM H. G. BUTLER, Kentucky, 1854 . . . . . . . . 70

The Trial of ARCHIBALD MCARDLE for Assault and Battery,

New York City, 1822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303

The Trial of JOHN HANLON for the Murder of MARY MOHR

MAN, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1870 . . . . . . . . 306

The Trial of WILLIAM BOOTT for Delivering a Challenge to a

Duel, Boston, Massachusetts, 1834 . . . . . . . . . . 370

The Trial of ROBERT C. HOOPER for sending a Challenge to a

Duel, Boston, Massachusetts, 1834 . . . . . . . . . 377

The Trial of HARRIS SEYMOUR, MOSES ROBERTS, HOLLO

WAY HAYWARD, HENRY HOWARD and JAMES GAN-
SON for the Abduction of WILLIAM MORGAN, New York,
1827 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385

The Trial of WILLIAM DANDRIDGE EPES for the Murder of

FRANCIS ADOLPHUS MUIR, Petersburg, Virginia, 1848 . 412

The Trial of BERTHINA TUCKER for Grand Larceny, New

York City, 1820 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520

The Trial of RICHARD LAWRENCE for Shooting at PRESI

DENT ANDREW JACKSON, Washington, 1835 . . . .

524

The Trial of CYRUS B. DEAN for the murder of JONATHAN

ORMSBY and ASA MARSH, Burlington, Vermont, 1808 . . 542

The Trial of JARED W. BELL for "Blasphemy, New York City, 1821 . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 558

PAGE The Trial of NOAH CHERRY, ROBERT THOMPSON and HAR.

RIS ATKINSON for the Murder of APPIE JANE WORLEY, Goldsboro, North Carolina, 1873 . . . . . . . . . . 562

The Action of JAMES MAURICE Against SAMUEL JUDD for

a Penalty, New York City, 1818 . . . . . . . . . . . 603

The Trial of EBENEZER CLOUGH for Embracery, Boston, Mas

sachusetts, 1833 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 664

The Trial of DR. VALORUS P. COOLIDGE for the Murder of

EDWARD MATHEWS, Mainc, 1848 . . . . . . . . . 732

The Trial of RAYMER C. WERTENDYKE and JAMES PIKE

for False Imprisonment and of ROBERT R. BROWNE for Assault and Battery, New York City, 1822 . . . . . . . 803

The Trial of COLONEL DAVID HENLEY for Improper Conduct

as an Officer of the American Army, Massachusetts, 1778 .806

The Trial of JONATHAN WALKER for Aiding Slaves to Escape,

Florida, 1844 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863

The Trial of ANTONIO ANCAROLA for Kidnapping, New York

City, 1879 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 868

THE TRIAL OF SUSAN B. ANTHONY FOR VOTING AT A CONGRESSIONAL ELEC

TION, NEW YORK, 1873.

THE NARRATIVE. At the election of President and Vice President of the United States and members of Congress, in November, 1872, Susan B. Anthony and several other women, offered their votes to the inspectors of election at the city of Rochester, N. Y., claiming the right to vote, as among the privileges and immunities secured to them as citizens by the fourteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Two of the three Inspectors of Election decided in favor of receiv. ing the offered votes, and they were received and deposited in the ballot box. For this act, the women, fourteen in number, were arrested and held to bail and indictments were found against them severally, under the Act of Congress of 1870, charging them with the offense of “knowingly voting without having a lawful right to vote.” Of the women voters, the case of Miss Anthony alone was brought to trial, a nolle prosequi having been entered upon the other indictments. Upon her trial it was proved that before offering her vote she was advised by her counsel that she had a right to vote; and that she entertained no doubt, at the time of voting, that she was entitled to vote. It was claimed in her behalf: I. That she was legally entitled to vote. II. That if she was not so entitled, but voted in good faith in the belief that it was her right, she was guilty of no crime. III. That she did vote in such good faith, and with such belief.

But the Court held that the defendant had no right to vote —that good faith constituted no defense—that there was nothing in the case for the jury to decide, and directed them to find a verdict of guilty; refusing to submit, at the request of the defendant's counsel, any question to the jury, or to allow the clerk to ask the jurors, severally, whether they assented to the verdict which the Court had directed to be entered. The verdict of guilty was entered by the clerk, as directed by the Court, without any express assent or dissent on the part of the jury. And a fine of one hundred dollars and costs, was imposed upon Miss Anthony.

THE TRIAL.1

In the United States Circuit Court, Northern District of New

York, Canandaigua, New York, June, 1873.

Hon. WARD HUNT,Judge.

June 17. In the previous month of January the Grand Jury for the Northern District of New York (United States Circuit Court), had returned an indictment against Susan B. Anthonyềa for

1 * "Account of the proceedings on the trial of Susan B. Anthony, on the charge of Illegal Voting, at the Presidential Election in November, 1872, and on the trial of Beverly W. Jones, Edwin T. Marsh, and William B. Hall, the Inspectors of Election by whom her Vote was Received. Rochester, N. Y. Daily Democrat and Chronicle Book Print, 3 West Main street.” An appendix contains two addresses (of 25 pp. each) by Miss Anthony and Matilda Joslyn Gage delivered at about fifty public meetings held before the trial and a criticism by John Hooker of Hartford, Conn., of the conduct of the trial.

2 Hunt, Samuel Ward. (1810-1886.) Born Utica, N. Y. Graduated Union College 1828. Studied law at Litchfield, Conn. Practiced law at Utica, N. Y. Member of New York Legislature 1839. Mayor of Utica, N. Y., 1844. Judge of New York Court of Appeals 1855. Associate Justice Supreme Court of the United States 18721882. LL. D. Union and Rutledge Colleges.

2a ANTHONY, Susan Brownell. (1820-1906.) Born South Adams, Mass., the daughter of a Quaker cotton manufacturer. Her father removed to Rochester, N. Y., in 1846, and she taught school there from 1835 to 1850. In 1852 she began the agitation for female suffrage, and in 1857 became a leader. She was influential in procuring legislation giving rights to married women, and in 1865 founded the Revolutionist, a journal devoted to the emancipation of women. She was a delegate to the International Council of Women in 1899. In 1900 her birthday was celebrated at Washington, and she retired

voting illegally at an election held for members of the Congress of the United States in the city of Rochester, on November 5, 1872. The defendant had pleaded not guilty and a jury having been impaneled the trial was begun today.

from the Presidency of the National American Woman's Suffrage Association, which she had held for many years. See History of Woman's Suffrage, edited by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Matilda Joslyn Gage, 3 vols. Rochester, N. Y., 1887.

3 The Jurors of the said District, then and there sworn and charged to inquire for the said United States of America, and for the body of said District, do, upon their oaths, present, that Susan B. Anthony now or late of Rochester, in the county of Monroe, with force and arms, etc., to-wit: at and in the first election district of the eighth ward of the city of Rochester, in the county of Monroe, in said Northern District of New York, and within the jurisdiction of this Court, heretofore, to-wit: on the fifth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, at an election duly held at and in the first election district of the said eighth ward of the city of Rochester, in said county, and in said Northern District of New York, which said election was for Representatives in the Congress of the United States, to-wit: a Representative in the Congress of the United States for the State of New York at large, and a Representative in the Congress of the United States for the twenty-ninth Congressional District of the State of New York, said first election district of said eighth ward of said city of Rochester, being then and there a part of said twentyninth Congressional District of the State.of New York, did knowingly, wrongfully and unlawfully vote for a Representative in the Congress of the United States for the State of New York at large, and for a Representative in the Congress of the United States for said twenty-ninth Congressional District, without having a lawful right to vote in said election district (the said Susan B. Anthony being then and there a person of the female sex,) as she, the said Susan B. Anthony then and there well knew, contrary to the form of the statute of the United States of America in such case made and provided, and against the peace of the United States of America and their dignity.

And the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do further present that said Susan B. Anthony, now or late of Rochester, in the county of Monroe, with force and arms, etc., to-wit: at and in the first election district of the eight ward of the city of Rochester, in the county of Monroe, in said Northern District of New York, and within the jurisdiction of this Court, heretofore, to-wit: on the fifth day of November, in the year of our Lord on thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, at an election duly held at and in the first election district of the said eighth ward, of said city of Rochester, in said county, and in said Northern District of New York,

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