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Inadequate and in

1880.-RESOLUTION APRIL 24; No. 25.

[46TH CONG.

sufficient drain-pipes, any ground or building, not of adequate and sufficient size to allow the free and entire passage of all SEC. 10. That drain-pipes, soil-pipes, passages into sowers, or connections between any sewer and soil-pipes, and pas- the material that enters the same, or not provided with good and sufficient sewer-traps, so as to presages into sewers. vent the escape of noisome odors and noxious gases therefrom, are hereby declared nuisances injurious to health; and any person creating or maintaining either of said nuisances, who shall fail, after due notice from this board, to abate the same, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars for every such offense.

Filthy and offensive water-closets and priv

ics.

Privics unlawfully and improperly con structed or located.

Leaky privies, privy. boxes, vaults, &c.

Fecal matter remaining in privies. Privics to be inspect ed and cleaned.

Depositing contents of privy in place not approved by board of health.

Bucket system of removing night-soil and transporting contents through streets, &c.

Contents of privies, &c., to be removed and transported only by air-tight apparatus,

&c.

Keeping and feeding hogs in pens, &c.

Filthy and unwholesome stables, sheds, and pens.

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Filthy and noisome tanneries, &c.

Boiling swill, burning bones, and other offensive and noxious trades, &c.

Unclean and filthy slaughter-houses.

Crushing or breaking stone, creating of fensive dust, &c.

Undressed dead animals remaining in

the District of Columbia, in or upon which people live, or where they congregate or assemble, or any
SEC. 11. That all water-closets and privies connected with any house, building, or premises within
kind of business is done, kept in a filthy and offensive condition, or from which noisome odors and
noxious gases arise, and all water-closets located within and being a part of any such house or building
not provided with proper sewer-traps so as to prevent the return and escape of noxious gases and
offensive odors from any public or private sewer connected therewith, are hereby declared nuisances
injurious to health; and any person creating, keeping, or maintaining such nuisance, shall, upon con-
viction, be fined not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars for every such offense.

lated suburbs of said cities, including Uniontown or Anacostia, and Mount Pleasant, in the District of
SEC. 12. That any privy within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, or the more densely popu
Columbia, constructed of other material than brick, cement, or wood, or which is not provided with a
sufficient box, bucket, or vessel for the reception of filth, and the inside of which is not at least five
feet distant from the line of any adjoining lot, and at least two (2) feet distant from any street, lane,
alley, camp, square, or public place, or public or private passage-way; and any privy so constructed
that it cannot be conveniently approached and cleaned, or in such manner that each and every vault,
box, bucket or vessel thereof is not made tight and close, so that the contents thereof cannot escape
therefrom, except as may be permitted by means of a passage-way or conduit under ground, for the
purpose of carrying away the contents of such vault, box, or vessel into any common sewer or drain,
is hereby declared a nuisance injurious to health; and any person who shall create, maintain or con-
tinue such nuisance, and shall fail, after due notice from this board, to abate or remedy the same, shall,
upon conviction, be fined not less than five nor more than twenty dollars for every such offense.
SEC. 13. That fecal matter, not thoroughly deodorized and disinfected, remaining in privies in the
upon the receipt of complaint in writing, cause any privy to be inspected, and, if necessary, cleaned
District of Columbia, is hereby declared a nuisance injurious to health; and the board of health shall,
by the persons authorized for said purpose; and any person owning or occupying premises on which
any privy is situated, who shall refuse to permit the same to be inspected and cleaned at the times
designated by said board, or whenever necessary, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than five
dollars for every such offense.

SEC. 14. [Not legalized.]

other than such as may be approved by this board; and any person so offending shall, upon conviction, SEC. 15. That it shall be unlawful for any person to deposit the contents of any privy in any place be fined not less than five nor more fifty dollars for every such offense.

vaults, sinks, and cess-pools within the cities of Washington and Georgetown, and the more densely SEC. 16. That the system heretofore in use of removing night-soil, cleaning privies, privy-boxes, populated suburbs of said cities, by buckets or other process agitating and exposing the contents thereof in the open air, and of transporting said contents in carts or other vehicles not air-tight, through the streets, avenues, alleys, and other public places within said cities, and their said suburbs, is hereby declared a nuisance injurious to health;

stances not soluble in water) of any privy, privy-box, vault, sink, or cess-pool within said cities or their And that, from and after the 15th day of October, A. D. 1873, no part of the contents (except subsaid suburbs, shall be removed therefrom, nor shall the same be transported through any of the streets, avenues, alleys, or other public places of said cities or of their said suburbs, except as the same shall be removed and transported by means of some air-tight apparatus, pneumatic or other process, so as to prevent the said contents from being agitated or exposed in the open air during said process of removal or transportation; and any person violating the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars for every such offense.

SEC. 17. That the keeping, herding, and feeding of hogs, in pens or otherwise, within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, or the more densely populated suburbs of said cities, is hereby declared a nuisance injurious to health; and any person creating or maintaining such nuisance, who shall fail, after due notice from this board, to abate the same, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars, for every such offense.

animals are kept, within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, or the more densely populated subSEC. 18. That filthy and unwholesome stables, sheds, pens, or places where cows, horses, mules, or other urbs of said cities, are hereby declared nuisances injurious to health; and any person creating or maintaining such nuisance who shall fail, after due notice from this board, to abate the same, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars for every such offense. remaining in any stable, shed, pen, or place within the cities of Washington or Georgetown or the more SEC. 19. That any animal affected by glanders or other contagious or pestilential disease, kept or densely populated suburbs of said cities, is hereby declared a nuisance injurious to health; and any person keeping or maintaining such nuisance, who shall fail, after due notice from this board, to abate the same, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars for every

such offense.

SEC. 20. That all establishments, or places of business for tanning, skinning, sconring, or dressing hides or leather within the District of Columbia, in a filthy condition, or from which noisome odors and noxious gases arise, are hereby declared nuisances injurious to health; and any person who shall erect, create, maintain, or continue such nuisance, and who shall fall, after due notice from this board, to abate the same, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars for every such offense. bones or shells; cleansing guts; making glue from any dead animal or part thereof; making or boiling SEC. 21. That the boiling of offal, swill, bones, fat, tallow, or lard; the crushing, grinding or burning of varnish or oil; making lampblack, turpentine, or tar; distilling ardent, alcoholic, or fermented spirits; storing or keeping scraps, fat, grease, or other offensive animal matter; rendering or trying out dead, undressed, and unslaughtered animals, or any other business or trade, whereby noisome stenches and odors and noxious gases arise or are generated, within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, or the more densely populated suburbs of said cities, are hereby declared nuisances injurious to health; and any person who shall cause, erect, create, maintain, or continue any such nuisance, and who shall fail, after due notice from this board, to abate the same, shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined not less than ten nor more than one hundred dollars for every such offense.

SEC. 22. That unclean and filthy slaughter-houses, rooms, buildings, or places where sheep, hogs, cattle, or other animals are slaughtered, within the District of Columbia, are hereby declared nuisances inju rious to health; and any person creating, keeping, or maintaining such nuisance, who shall fail, after due notice from this board, to abate the same, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars for every such offense.

SEC. 23. That the crushing or breaking of stone within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, or the more densely populated suburbs of said cities, by machines or otherwise, in such manner as to create offensive and deleterious dust, is hereby declared a nuisance injurious to health; and any person creat ing or maintaining said nuisance, who shall fail, after due notice from this board, to remove or abate the same, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars for every such offense. town, or the more densely-populated suburbs of said cities, viz: Any of the horse, mule, or jack kind, or SEC. 24. That undressed dead animals being or lying in any part of the cities of Washington or George

any cow, goat, calf, sheep, dog, or swine, are hereby declared nuisances injurious to health; and any per cities of Washington son owning, possessing, or controlling any such dead animal, or any person who shall knowingly place and Georgetown. or allow such dead animal to remain in any part of said cities or their said suburbs, and who shall fail to give notice thereof to the board of health within eight hours after the death of said animal, shall, upon conviction, be fined not less than five nor more than ten dollars for every such offense. SEC. 25. That unmuzzled dogs, going upon any street, avenue, or other public place, between the fif Unmuzzled and hyteenth day of May and the fifteenth day of October in any year, mad dogs, and dogs bitten by hydro- drophobic dogs going phobic dogs, are hereby declared nuisances injurious to health; and any person owning or keeping any at large, to be killed by dog who shall allow the same to go unmuzzled upon any street, alley, or other public place, between the owner, or taken up and fifteenth day of May and the fifteenth day of October in any year, or who shall refuse to kill, or to cause shot by poundmaster to be killed, any such dog owned or kept by him, which has gone mad, or given symptoms of hydropho- if not redeemed. bia, or who shall omit to contine any such animal exposed to such disease, or which has been bitten by a hydrophobic dog or animal, shall be deemed guilty of maintaining a nuisance, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not less than one nor more than twenty-five dollars; and any dog going at large between the fifteenth day of May and the fifteenth day of October in any year, without a proper muzzle, shall be taken up by the poundmaster, who shall charge the owner of the same one dollar for its redemp tion; and every such dog not redeemed within twenty-four hours after having been taken up as aforesaid, shall be liable to be shot by said poundmaster.

1878, June 19, ch. 323.

Health-officer to

SEC. 26. That it shall be the duty of the health-officer appointed by this board, upon receiving information or obtaining knowledge of the existence of any thing or things herein declared to be nuisances, abate nuisances after or any thing or things which may hereafter be declared to be nuisances by any ordinance or resolution notice to party liable, enacted or adopted by this board, to notify the person or persons committing, creating, keeping, or main- and costs of removal taining the same, to remove, or cause to be removed, the same within twenty-four hours, or such other to be collected by suit. reasonable time as may be determined by this board, after such notice bo duly given; and if the same be not removed by such person or persons within the time prescribed in said notice, it shall be the duty of the health-officer aforesaid to remove, or cause to be removed, such nuisance or nuisances, and all costs and expenses of such removal shall be paid by the persons committing, creating, keeping, or maintaining such nuisance or nuisances; and if the said costs and expenses thus accruing shall not be paid within ten days after such removal by said health-officer, the same shall be collected from the person or persons committing, creating, keeping, or maintaining such nuisances, by suit at law.

SEC. 27. That all fines and penalties imposed by any section of this ordinance shall be collected by prosecution in the police or other proper court of the District of Columbia, by information filed in said by information at incourt, at the instance of the board of health.

Fines to be collected stance of board of health.

Court to order abate

And whenever the nuisance complained of is set forth as continuing and existing, and is shown to be
such to the satisfaction of the court before whom the person creating or maintaining said nuisance is ment of nuisances.
tried, the party so offending shall, upon conviction thereof, in addition to the fine imposed, be ordered
by said court to abate or remove said nuisance.

SEC. 28. That all ordinances, or parts of ordinances, of this board, inconsistent or in conflict with the
foregoing provisions of this ordinance are hereby repealed.
November 19, 1875.

Repeal.

AN ORDINANCE

To amend "An ordinance to prevent domestic animals from running at large within the cities of Washington and Georgetown, passed by the Board of Health May 19, 1871."

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[SECTION 1], That domestic animals shall not be permitted to run at large within the limits of the cities of Washington and Georgetown, and all domestic animals found running at large within the limits of said cities shall be taken up and impounded.

Domestic animals running at large to be impounded. claimed.

SEC. 2. That every animal taken up and impounded as aforesaid, within forty-eight hours after such to be sold if not impounding, if not claimed, and the charges for taking up, impounding, and keeping the same paid, shall be sold at public auction; and the poundmaster appointed by this Board, as hereinafter provided, is hereby authorized to act as anctioneer at said sale.

proceeds of sale in

SEC. 3. That the proceeds of such sales shall be paid over to the Treasurer of the Board, who shall
give duplicate receipts therefor, one copy of the same to be retained by the officer selling such animals, such case.
and the other copy to be by said officer filed with the Secretary of the Board; and it shall be the duty
of said treasurer to keep an accurate account of all moneys received by him under the provisions of
this ordinance, and to report the same from time to time as required by the Board.

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SEC. 4. That all moneys received by said Treasurer from the sale of animals, as aforesaid, shall, if when may be paid demanded by the owner of such animals, at any time within one year from the sale thereof, upon satis- to owner. factory proof that such claimant was the owner of such animal sold as aforesaid, after deduction of charges and expenses, as hereinafter specified, of taking up, and impounding, and keeping such animals, be paid to said claimant; otherwise said moneys shall be used by this Board for sanitary purposes within and for the benefit of the District of Columbia.

Charges for im

SEC. 5. That the charges for taking up and impounding domestic animals found running at large
within the cities of Washington and Georgetown shall be as follows, to wit: For each horse, mule, bull, pounding.
steer, cow, calf, heifer, two dollars; and for each sheep, goat, hog, one dollar; and for each goose, fifty
cents; and, in addition to said several sums, the charges for keeping said animals shall be the reason-
able and necessary expenses thereof, to be paid by owner.

SEC. 6. That no person shall break open, or in any manner, directly or indirectly, aid or assist in breaking open, any pound established by the Board of Health, or take or let any animal out of such pound, without the consent of the officer keeping the same; nor shall any person or persons hinder, delay, or obstruct any person or persons engaged in driving or carrying to such pound any animal or animals liable to be taken up or impounded under the provisions of this ordinance; and any person violating the provisions of this section shall be punished, upon conviction thereof, by a fine of not less than five dollars nor more than twenty-five dollars for each and every such violation.

Penalty for breaking open pound, &c.

Poundmaster and

SEC. 7. That there shall be appointed by the Board of Health a poundmaster, whose duty it shall be
to take up and impound all domestic animals found running at large within the cities of Washington his duties.
and Georgetown, to keep safely and carefully all property pertaining to said pound, and all animals
impounded therein; and to report from time to time, through the Health officer, as required by this
Board, the condition of said pound, and what repairs, if any, are needed; and the number and descrip-
tion of the animals therein impounded, and what disposition has been made of the same; and to report
all moneys received by him under the provisions of this ordinance. And it shall be the further duty
of said poundmaster to pay over, daily, all moneys received as aforesaid to the Health Officer, taking
receipt therefor, and said poundmaster shall give good and sufficient bonds for the proper discharge of
his several duties, as herein provided.

Poundkeeper to keep record; to deliv. er animals on evidence of ownership.

Sale of animals to be only after notice.

Repeal.

SEC. 8. That the poundmaster appointed by this board shall keep a register of all animals taken up by him, with an accurate description of the same, which shall at all times be open to the inspection of the public; and the said poundmaster is hereby forbidden to deliver any animal taken up and impounded to any person applying for the same, unless such person shall present good and sufficient evidence of his ownership or right to the possession of said animal;

And no sale of any animal or animals impounded as aforesaid shall be made until due public notice by advertisement in at least one newspaper of such sale shall have been given, together with a description of the animal or animals to be sold, as hereinbefore provided.

SEC. 9. That any ordinance or part of an ordinance heretofore passed by the Board of Health of the District of Columbia, inconsistent with the foregoing, be, and the same is hereby, repealed.

AN ORDINANCE

Unwholesome food; penalty for sale of.

Adulterated food or

drink.

Sickly or unwholesome animals.

Slaughtering dis eased cattle.

Offering for sale poisonous or unwholesome food or drink.

Meat and vegetable stalls, &c., to be kept clean, &c.

Unwholesome milk.

-meat.

SECTION

To prevent the sale of unwholesome food in the cities of Washington and Georgetown.

1. Unwholesome food; penalty for sale of.

2. Adulterated food or drink.

3. Sickly or unwholesome animals.

4. Slaughtering diseased cattle.

5. Offering for sale poisonous or unwholesome

food or drink.

Be it ordained, &c.

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[SECTION 1], That no person shall knowingly sell, or cause to be sold, within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, any impure, diseased, decayed, or unwholesome provisions, nor shall any person fraudulently adulterate, for the purpose of sale within said cities, any bread or other material intended to be used for food with any substance of a poisonous character, or any substance injurious to health; and any person violating the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars for each and every such offense.

SEC. 2. That no person shall offer for sale within the cities of Washington or Georgetown any liquor used for drink, whether malt, vinous, or ardent, or the milk of cows or goats, intended to be used for food or drink, which has been adulterated with any poisonous or deleterious ingredient; and any person violating the provisions of this section, shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars for each and every such offense.

SEC. 3. That no person shall convey into the cities of Washington or Georgetown, and offer for sale in any part of said cities, any animal or part of animal that may be sickly, diseased, or unwholesome, or which may have died from disease or accident, or any fish or vegetables not fresh, sound, and fit for food; and any person violating the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars for each and every such offense.

SEC. 4. That no person shall slaughter any cattle for the purpose of sale as food within the cities of Washington and Georgetown when such cattle are in a feverish or diseased condition; and any person violating the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars for each and every such offense.

SEC. 5. That no person, whether owner, manager, keeper of, agent, bar-tender, or clerk, in any saloon, restaurant, boarding-house, or eating-house, located within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, shall offer for sale as food or drink anything poisonous or unwholesome; and any person violating the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars for each and every su h offense.

SEC. 6. That no person owning, renting, leasing, or occupying any stall, room, or stand where meats or vegetables are sold for food, within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, shall fail to keep said stall, room, or stand in a cleanly condition; nor shall such person allow said meats or vegetables to become poisoned, or infected, or unfit for food, by reason of uncleanly condition of such stall, room, or stand; and any person violating the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more than twenty-five dollars for each and every such offense.

SEC. 7. That no person shall offer for sale, within the cities of Washington or Georgetown, any unwholesome, watered, or adulterated milk, or swill-milk, or milk from cows kept up and fed on garbage, swill, or other deleterious substance; nor shall any person offer for sale within said cities any butter or cheese made from such unwholesome milk; and any person violating the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not less than five nor more than twenty dollars for each and every such offense.

SEC. 8. That on and after the passage of this ordinance it shall be unlawful for any person or persons to sell or expose for sale within the cities of Washington and Georgetown, any unsound, blown, or unwholesome meat, or other article of food, under a penalty of not less than five nor more than twenty-five dollars for each and every such offense.

AN ORDINANCE

Health-officer

and inspectors of streets, food, &c.

Health-officer's

duty.

Inspector's duty to inspect streets.

To provide for the inspection of streets, food, live-stock, fish and other marine products in the cities of
Washington and Georgetown, and to define the duties of inspectors and other officers of the Board of

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[SECTION 1], That there shall be appointed by the board of health a Health-Officer and such inspectors as may be required, who shall be assigned to the several duties of inspection of streets, of food, of livestock, of fish and other marine products, or detailed for the performance of such other duties as may be necessary.

SEC. 2. That it shall be the duty of the health-officer, as he may be directed by this board, to execute or cause to be executed, the ordinances, resolutions, and orders of the board, and generally, according to its instructions, to exercise a practical supervision in respect to inspectors, pound-masters, and the cler ical force in his office; and said Health-officer shall devote his services to the aforesaid purposes as the Board may direct.

SEC. 3. That it shall be the duty of each Inspector of strects to visit every part of his district daily, and carefully inspect all streets, alleys, yards, and inclosures, horse and cow stables, privies, slaughterhouses, wharves, and every other place where offensive or deleterious matter may exist, and to report prompt y to the Health-officer any and all nuisances injurious to health; and the inspectors of streets shall perform such other duties and special inspections as may be directed by the Health-officer.

Inspector to inspect

SEC. 4. That it shall be the duty of each inspector of food to attend the market or markets within his
inspection-district every morning, at the time when sales commence, and carefully inspect all meats, food.
fowl, game, and vegetables offered for sale, and condemn, seize, and cause to be removed such as may be
diseased, or from any other cause rendered unfit for food. He shall also visit, as early as practicable
each day, every green-grocery or other place within his district, where articles of food are kept for sale,
and perform his duty of inspection, condemnation, seizure, and removal as hereinbefore prescribed. He
shall report his official proceedings daily to the Health-officer, and in the performance of his duties shall
be under the direction of said officer; and the inspectors of food shall perform such other duties and
special inspections as may be directed by the Health-officer.

SEC. 5. That it shall be the duty of the inspector of live-stock to carefully inspect all cattle, hogs, to inspect live-
sheep, or other animals intended to be killed and sold for consumption as food in the cities of Washing stock.
ton and Georgetown, and to condemn all such as may be diseased, or from any other cause rendered
unfit for food; and it is hereby made the duty of said inspector to brand with the letter "C" all cattle,
hogs, sheep, or other animals condemned as aforesaid, and said Inspector shall report his official pro-
ceedings daily to the Health-officer.

SEC. 6. That it shall be the duty of the inspector of fish and other marine products to examine and inspect all fish, oysters, clams, lobsters, and other marine products, landing by boat, arriving by rail, or otherwise brought by any person or persons into the cities of Washington and Georgetown; and if, upon such inspection, said inspector shall find any of the said marine products to be in an unsound, diseased, or unwholesome condition, it shall be his duty to prohibit their sale; and the said inspector of fish is hereby authorized, empowered, and directed to condemn, seize, and remove any unsound, diseased, or unwholesome fish, oysters, clams, lobsters, crabs, or other marine products which may be offered for sale as food within the cities of Washington and Georgetown.

to inspect fish.

Powers of fish in

Proceedings when

SEC. 7. That in the performance of the duties herein prescribed the Inspector of Fish shall be, and is hereby, authorized and empowered to board all boats, vessels, steamboats, and cars, and to stop all spector. vehicles believed by him to contain fish or other marine products, for the purpose of enforcing the provis ions of this ordinance, and said Inspector shall report his official proceedings daily to the Health-officer. SEC. 8. That upon any cattle, meat, birds, fowls, fish or other marine products, vegetables, or other articles of food being found by any inspector or other officer of the Board of Health in a condition which meat, &c., is found unis, in his judgment, unwholesome, and unfit for use as human food, or in a condition or of a quality wholesome. forbidden by the ordinances of this Board, but with respect to the quality and condition of which articles of food said Inspector or other officer may be in doubt, he shall forbid the sale thereof, and order that the same be set aside, and shall at once notify the Health-officer of such action; and if, upon inspection, the Health-officer shall concur in the judgment of the Inspector or other officer aforesaid, said Health-officer shall prohibit the sale and order the removal of said articles, according to the regu lations of the Board of Health; and if the Health-officer shall not concur in the judgment of the Inspector or other officer aforesaid, the sale of said articles shall be allowed. But if, upon inspection, the Health-officer is in doubt as to whether said articles should be condemned or not, then the committee on food-inspections of the Board of Health shall decide whether or not said articles shall be condemned and the sale thereof forbidden: Provided, That no article of food, in a decayed or offensive condition, shall be allowed to remain where found, but the same shall be caused to be removed forthwith by the inspector or officer aforesaid, according to the rules and regulations of the Board of Health. SEC. 9. That any person who shall molest, hinder, or in any manner prevent said Health-officer or Penalty for hinderany inspector appointed by this Board from performing any duty imposed upon him or them by the ing, &c., health officer provisions of this ordinance, shall be punished by a fine of not less than twenty nor more than one and inspector. hundred dollars for each and every such offense.

AN ORDINANCE

To amend section 10 of the code, so as to read:
Drain-pipes; when declared nuisances, &c.

SECTION 10. And be it further ordained and enacted, That drain-pipes, soil-pipes, or passages into Drain-pipes; when sewers, which are of inadequate and insufficient size, or which are not provided with proper sewer- declared nuisances, traps, within the District of Columbia, are hereby declared nuisances, injurious to health; and any &c. person or persons, whether owner or tenant (board, department, or corporation officer,) using or possessing any drain-pipe, soil-pipe, passage or connection between any sewer and any ground, building, or place of business, who shall fail to make such drain-pipe, soil-pipe, passage or connection of adequate or sufficient size to allow the free and entire passage of all that enters or should enter the same, and provide them with proper sewer-traps; and who shall fail, after notice duly served upon him, to supply such pipes of adequate and sufficient size, and provided with proper sewer-traps, shall be deemed guilty of keeping and maintaining a nuisance, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of not less than five dollars nor more than ten dollars. July 30, 1875.

AN ORDINANCE

To amend ordinance passed May 13, 1873, to read as follows:
Water-closets; when declared nuisances, &c.

SECTION 1. That all water-closets and privies connected with any house, building, or premises within Water-closets; when the District of Columbia, in and upon which people live, or where they do congregate or assemble, or declared nuisances, any kind of business is done, kept in an uncleanly and foul condition, and from which offensive smells &c. and noxious gases arise, and all water-closets located within and being a part of any such house or building not provided with proper sewer-traps, so as to prevent the return and escape of noxious gases and offensive odors from any public or private sewer connected therewith, are hereby declared to be nuisances, injurious to health; and any person creating, keeping, and maintaining such nuisance, after due notice served upon him by this board to abate the same within twenty-four hours or within such reasonable time as may be determined by this board, shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not less than five dollars nor more than twenty-five dollars for each and every day such nuisance is allowed to remain unabated. July 30, 1875.

AN ORDINANCE

To prevent committing or creating nuisances in or about public urinal or urinals located within the cities of Washington and Georgetown.

Be it ordained, &c.,

Obstructions, &c., to urinals.

Obstructions, &c., to'

That focal matter deposited in or about any public urinal or urinals located within the cities of
Washington or Georgetown, defecating in or about said urinal or urinals, or obstructing the same in urinals.
any manner or by any means whatever, are hereby declared to be nuisances, injurious to health, and
any person convicted of committing or creating either of said nuisances shall be fined not less than ten
dollars nor more than fifty dollars for every such offense.

December 28, 1876.

1880.-RESOLUTION APRIL 24; No. 25.

[46TH CONG.

Small-pox: the dis

caso.

Vaccination.

Isolation.

Warning-signs.

Disinfection.

Care of sick-room.

Notice to Board of Health.

Interments.

Small-pox ambulances, inspectors, and drivers.

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Par. 9. Small-pox ambulances, inspectors, and drivers.
Promulgation.

Physicians attending small-pox patients.
Regulations to prevent the spread of small-pox.

[Par 1.] The essential nature of small-pox is to diffuse itself, and, under certain favorable conditions, it is not only communicable from person to person, but capable of being transported to great distances. To prevent the propagation of the specific poison, the following sanitary regulations have been adopted by the Board of Health and approved by the Governor of the District of Columbia:

[Par. 2.] Parents and guardians shall cause their children and wards to be vaccinated before they attain the age of two years, and revaccinated whenever the Board of Health shall, after five years from the last vaccination, require it.

The Board of Health hereby orders and requires the vaccination of all the inhabitants in the District of Columbia, and, whenever in their opinion the public health demands it, the revaccination of all persons who do not furnish satisfactory evidence that they have been successfully vaccinated or revaccinated within five years.

The Board of Health will furnish the means of vaccination to such persons as are unable to pay for the same. For this purpose the physicians to the poor, or their assistants, will be directed to vaccinate the poor gratuitously; and, whenever the exigency requires it, physicians will be employed to go from house to house for the purpose of vaccinating all people who need vaccination.

Principals of incorporated manufacturing companies, superintendents of almshouses, reform and industrial schools, lunatic-hospitals, and of all other charities where the poor and sick are received; masters of houses of correction, jailers, keepers of prisons, and directors or officers of all institutions supported or aided by the District of Columbia, shall, at the expense of their respective corporations or institutions, cause all inmates thereof to be vaccinated immediately upon their admission thereto, unless they produce sufficient evidence of previous successful vaccination having taken place within five years. (Par. 3.] Small-pox being eminently contagious and infectious, isolation forms an imperative necessity for the prevention of its propagation. Whenever, therefore, a case of small-pox occurs in a dwelling containing more than two inhabitants, it shall be the duty of the head of the family to select the most remote apartment for the occupancy of the person afflicted with small-pox-the highest room in the dwelling to be preferred.

And whenever, in a tenement-house and lodging-house, boarding-house, or hotel, the person afflicted by the small-pox cannot be isolated to the satisfaction of the Health-officer, said person shall be removed to the small-pox hospital by agents employed for the purpose by the Board of Health.

[Par. 4.] Wherever a case of small-pox breaks out in any dwelling or place, the warning-flag (made of yellow flannel) shall be attached to, and exposed from, the premises occupied by said case, as a warning to the passer-by of the presence of small-pox in that locality And if the yellow flag be not immediately attainable, a placard, on which is written, in large and legible letters, "Small-pox here," shall be fastened upon an exposed part of the infected house or dwelling.

[Par. 5.] It shall be the duty of those in whose dwellings small-pox occurs to fumigate the house, and the room of the patient, with sulphur three times a day; to cleanse and disinfect every part of the dwelling by the free use of chlorinated soda, carbolic acid, bromo chloralum, or such other disinfectant as the Board of Health may direct.

A cloth of the size of a square yard, steeped in a solution of chlorinated soda, carbolic acid, or bromo chloralum, shall be hung in the patient's room and kept constantly saturated with the said disinfectants. [Par. 6. The room of the patient shall be kept thoroughly ventilated, and no other person than a nurse who has had the small-pox, or a member of the family, shall be allowed to enter the same. sons being in attendance upon the sick shall not come in contact with other inmates or persons, unless they have been previously properly fumigated and disinfected, and have changed the clothing worn by Perthem while in the sick-room.

It shall be the duty of said attendants to see that no clothing is conveyed from the sick-room that has not been previously disinfected and fumigated. And, moreover, all clothing in said room, or worn by the patient while affected by small-pox, shall be kept distinct and separate, and shall be given out to be washed only to persons who have had the small-pox, the fact to be stated in every instance that they are from a small-pox patient, and must, therefore, be kept and washed separately.

[Par. 7.] It is the duty of every good citizen immediately to notify the Board of Health of every case of small-pox coming to his knowledge. But it is especially enjoined by law upon the proprietors of tenement-houses, lodging-houses, boarding-houses, and hotels, to notify the Board of Health of the pres ence of small-pox in their respective abodes, under penalty of fine and imprisonment, and this law against all persons concerned will be strictly enforced.

[Par. 8.] It shall be the duty of the citizen to immediately notify the Board of Health of the death of any person from small-pox, of which he may have knowledge, and no one except such as may have had the small-pox, and the officers of the Board of Health assigned to that duty shall take charge of, dress, or bury the body of the person who has thus died.

The interment of persons dying from small-pox shall take place within six hours after death, or as soon as the circumstances of the case will allow; and no person who has died of small-pox shall be buried in private or public cemeteries or burying-grounds without a permit from the Board of Health, a member of the same, or the Health-officer.

Whenever funeral obsequies may be desired, the body shall be placed in a hermetically-sealed metal coffin, and no person will he allowed to be present at said obsequies or follow the corpse to the grave except the nearest kin-relations; and under no circumstances shall a corpse infected with small-pox be taken to a church or meeting-house, but it shall be conveyed directly from the house to the grave. When people are so poor as to be unable to incur the expense of coffin and burial, any undertaker appointed to furnish coflins to the poor shail provide the coffin, and in every case shall take the same to the house in which the corpse lies, but shall not place said corpse in the coffin, or take any part in laying out the dead, unless he has had the small-pox, and properly fumigated and disinfected his cloth ing. The laying out of the body and the burial shall be done by the officers appointed for that purpose by the Board of Health.

[Par. 9.] The small-pox ambulances shall be kept at the small-pox hospital.

The ambulance shall be accompanied by an inspector whenever needed for the removal of small-pox patients or otherwise.

The inspector accompanying the ambulance and the driver are forbidden from entering street-cars or any public conveyance.

They shall also keep a suit of clothing to wear during the service of removing small-pox patients: said suit of clothing to be kept fumigated and disinfected at all times, and under no circumstances shall they wear the said clothing when off duty.

The inspector attending to small-pox patients and the driver of the ambulance shall, until otherwise
ordered, wear a linen suit while on duty.

The inspector detailed to attend to the removal of small-pox patients shall fumigate and disinfect the
dwellings where small-pox cases occur.
up, carried safely to the almshouse, and destroyed. He shall keep an account of the clothes or furniture
He shall see that the clothing is properly disinfected, packed
of poor persons which have been destroyed, the probable value of the same, and the names of the par-
ties to whom they belong, and give a receipt for the same.

Under no circumstances shall the ambulance be allowed to tarry in the streets, except for such length
of time as will be required to remove the patient or the body.

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