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and pretensions of artful empirics and impostors. Physicians ought to use all the influence which they may possess, as professors in Colleges of Pharmacy, and by exercising their option in regard to the shops to which their prescriptions shall be sent, to discourage druggists and apothecaries from vending quack or secret medicines, or from being in any way engaged in their manufacture and sale.

ART. II.- Obligations of the public to physicians. § 1. The benefits accruing to the public, directly and indirectly, from the active and unwearied beneficence of the profession, are so numerous and important, that physicians are justly entitled to the utmost consideration and respect from the community. The public ought likewise to entertain a just appreciation of medical qualifications; to make a proper discrimination between true science and the assumptions of ignorance and empiricism; to afford every encouragement and facility for the acquisition of medical education—and no longer to allow the statute-books to exhibit the anomaly of exacting knowledge from physicians, under a liability to heavy penalties, and of making them obnoxious to punishment for resorting to the only means of obtaining it.

OFFICERS

OF THE

AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

CATALOGUE OF THE OFFICERS

OF THE

AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

PRESIDENTS AND VICE-PRESIDENTS OF THE AMERICAN

MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

1847-48. PHILADELPHIA.

PRESIDENT.
NATHANIEL CHAPMAN, M.D., Pennsylvania.

VICE-PRESIDENTS.
JONATHAN KNIGHT, M. D., Connecticut. .
ALEXANDER H. STEVENS, M. D., New York.
JAMES MOULTRIE, M. D., South Carolina.
A. H. BUCHANAN, M. D., Tennessee.

1848-49. BALTIMORE.

PRESIDENT.
A LEXANDER H. STEVENS, M. D., New York,

VICE-PRESIDENTS.
John C. WARREN, M. D., Massachusetts.
SAMUEL Jackson, M. D., Pennsylvania.
Paul F. Eve, M. D., Georgia.
W. M. Awl, M. D., Ohio.

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