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which bound them as members of the American Medical Association, I cannot see how they can expect their delegates to be received into an Association whose laws they are not willing to obey, and which must necessarily, therefore, refuse them admittance. I must therefore respectfully decline to act as delegate, and therefore return my certificate.

Respectfully,

LEWIS A. SAYRE.

PHILADELPHIA, May 30, 1882. To the Acting President of the American Medical Association.

DEAR SIR: I deeply regret that engagements from which it is impossible to extricate myself, will deprive me of the pleasure of attending the meeting of the Association at St. Paul, and of participating in its deliberations, which promise to be of more than ordinary interest on account of the extraordinary proceedings of the New York State Medical Society. I regard these proceedings as an outrage which every member of the profession should consider as a deep personal insult, and which the Association should rebuke in a most stern and uncompromising manner.

Hoping that the approaching meeting will be a success, and that its deliberations will be conducted with that wisdom and calm judgment which have heretofore characterized them, I am, dear sir, very truly and respectfully, Your friend and obedient servant,

S. D. GROSS. The Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements then introduced to the Association as its presiding officer the first Vice-President, Dr. P. O. HOOPER, of Arkansas, who delivered the Annual Address.

On motion of Dr. William BRODIE, of Michigan, the thanks of the Association were extended to the President for his address, and a copy was requested for publication. The Permanent Secretary read the following :

War DEPARTMENT, SURGEON GENERAL'S OFFICE,

WASHINGTON, D. C., January 31, 1882. Gentlemen of the American Medical Association :

At your Richmond meeting last May, you conferred upon me the great honor of electing me your President for the present year. At the time, I was just recovering from the effects of a serious injury, and was unable to be with you. I cannot now find language to tell you how highly I prized, and shall always prize, this token of your esteem. Although, of course, I fully understood that your action was especially intended to express your appreciation of the services of the Medical Corps of the army, and of their various efforts to advance the

interests of medical science in America, yet I could not but feel the compliment of being selected by you as in some sort the representative of that noble body of medical men, and I looked forward with the greatest pleasure to meeting you at St. Paul. Unfortunately, on account of seriously impaired health, I find this will be impossible. I must trust your generosity to forgive my inability to perform the duties entrusted to me. May I not also hope for your sympathy and good wishes?

Your obedient servant,

J. J. WOODWARD,

Surgeon, U. S. Army. On motion of Dr. J. S. COHEN, of Pennsylvania, a cablegram was sent to Dr. Woodward, expressing regrets at his absence, and hopes for his speedy restoration to health. The Permanent Secretary read the following:

BRATTLEBORO', Vr., June 2. 1882. MY DEAR DOCTOR: I regret exceedingly that circumstances over which I have no control will prevent my being present at the Thirty-third Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association. Please express to the members present my best wishes for their general welfare and my great desire that this meeting may be a success. Let there be no lourering of the Association's standard; but let its aims and scientific standards be high and noble as they have been in the past, but let them be advanced as becomes the advocates of scientific medicine.

Yours truly,

HENRY D. HOLTON. On motion, both communications were directed to be entered on the minutes.

On motion, the members of the Minnesota State Medical Society, now in session in St. Paul, were elected members by invitation.

Dr. N. S. DAVIS, of Illinois, presented a preamble and resolution in behalf of the Woman's National Christian Temperance Union :

Whereas alcoholic intemperance is a prolific cause of disease, and prevention through the education of the people is one of its most powerful antidotes,

Resolved, That we approve teaching the children and youth in the schools and educational institutions in this country, as facts of hygiene, the physiological dangers and evils resulting from the use of alcoholic beverages; and

Whereas it is the acknowledged duty of the State to provide for such education of the people as is essential to good citizenship,

Resolved, That we recommend State legislatures to enact a law, requiring the physiological dangers and evils resulting from the use of alcoholic beverages to be taught in all schools supported by public money, or under State control.

It was referred, at the request of Dr. Davis, to the Section on State Medicine.

The Permanent Secretary read the following, which, on motion, was referred to the Committee on Nominations:

EGG HARBOR CITY, N. J., May 27, 1882. DR. WILLIAM B. ATKINSON,

Philadelphia Pa. DEAR SIR: Enclosed please find an invitation to the American Medical Association, requesting them to hold their next annual meeting at Atlantic City, New Jersey. The accompanying resolutions were passed at an extra meeting of the Atlantic County Medical Society, held at Atlantic City this day. We think that Atlantic City would be a very desirable place for the meeting of the American Medical Association, and would do all in our power to make it pleasant for our professional brethren from all parts of the country. We would also state that the citizens of Atlantic City offer to entertain all the members of the Association free of cost, and would therefore urge upon your body the acceptance of our invitation, and solicit them to choose Atlantic City as the place for the next annual meeting Respectfully yours,

THEODORE H. BOYSEN, M.D., Secretary Atlantic County Medical Society.

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., May 27, 1882. TO THE AMERICAN MEDICAL AssociatioN.

GREETING: At a special meeting of the Atlantic County Medical Society of New Jersey, held this day, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted, and the Secretary instructed to forward the same to the Secretary of the American Medical Association:

Whereas the southern coast of New Jersey has become famous as a health resort throughout all the year, it is important that the representative physicians of the country should have an opportunity of personally testing this climate, therefore,

Resolved, That on behalf of the medical profession of Atlantic County and the citizens of Atlantic City, New Jersey, we hereby invite the American Medical Association to hold its next annual meeting in Atlantic City, and to accept for the usual period of its sessions the hospitality of the city.

BOARDMAN REED, M.D.,

President Atlantic County Medical Society. Attest: THEO. H. BOYSEN, M.D.,

Secretary.

The Permanent Secretary then read the list of members and delegates as registered :

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State Medical Society,

C. C. ALLEN, ROBERT BOAL, EDGAR P. Cook, J. M. Cowan, J. W. Dora, DANIEL E. FOOTE, WALTER HAY, John H. HOLLISTER, ELLEN INGERSOLL, DANIEL S. JENKS, EDWARD W. JENKS, J. PERRIN JOHNSON, WM. M. KAULL, WM. T. KIRK, DANIEL LICHTY, JESSE LONG, GEO. W. NESBITT, HENRY P. NEWMAN, John E. OWENS, DAVID PRINCE, WILMOT LELAND Ransom, WM. R. Shinn, MRS. CATHARINE B. SLATER, C. TRUESDALE.

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