History of Civilization in England, Volume 1

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D. Appleton and Company, 1866
 

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Illustration of these principles from Ireland
47
And from Mexico and Peru
60
Influence of the general aspects of nature upon the imagination
85
This proposition illustrated by a comparison between Hindustan
92
MENTAL LAWS ARE EITHER MORAL OR INTELLECTUAL COMPARISON OF MORAL
121
There is no evidence that the natural faculties of man improve
128
Further illustration from Central America
130
The diminution of religious persecution is owing to the progress
136
As civilization advances men of intellect avoid becoming soldiers
142
The church rallied for a moment under Anne
146
The discoveries made by political economists 150158
151
The application of steam to purposes of travelling 158160
158
CHAPTER III
164
Comparison of the history of England with that of France 169171
169
Necessity of ascertaining the fundamental laws of intellectual pro
176
Influence of religion on the progress of society 184191
184
And from Sweden and Scotland 191193
191
Influence of government on the progress of society
197
They have also increased hypocrisy and perjury 204
204
The earliest histories are ballads 212215
212
Examination of the two metaphysical methods of generalizing men
216
A change of religion in any country also tends to corrupt its early
218
Illustration of this from the history of Charlemagne by Turpin 231232
231
This absurd way of writing history was the natural result of
234
And in the predictions of Stoffer respecting the Deluge
239
The spirit of doubt was a necessary precursor of improvement
242
Failure of these methods
243
Hooker contrasted with Jewel 248249
248
Great advantage of this 254259
254
Under Charles II it takes a frivolous form at court
261
Hence the French Protestants being headed by the clergy become
266
It causes the establishment of the Royal Society
269
These improvements were due to the sceptical and inquiring spirit 279280
279
This alliance was dissolved by the Declaration of Indulgence 286287
286
Evidence of the illiberality of the French Protestants
292
Hostility between them and William III
293
Political meetings and publication of parliamentary debates
295
They raise a civil war which was a struggle of classes rather than
304
Doctrine of personal representation and idea of independence
313
This liberal policy on the part of the government was only part of
417
And by Mazarin
431
CHAPTER IX
440
In England the nobles were less powerful than in France
444
This state contrasted with that of England
450
AND ENGLAND
454
Illustration from the history of chivalry
456
Analogy between the Reformation and the revolutions of the seven
462
and Charles I vainly attempted to restore their power
468
But in France the energy of the protective spirit and the power
477
As such men were the leaders of the Fronde the rebellion naturally
483
CHAPTER XI
490
But his system of protecting literature is injurious 499500
499
Also in zoology and in chemistry
505
Illustrations from the history of French art 511512
511
CHAPTER XII
517
Admiration of England expressed by Frenchmen
528
In France literature was the last resource of liberty
541
Hence they were led to assail Christianity 547550
547
CHAPTER XIII
553
Still further progress early in the seventeenth century 557560
557
Illustration of this from the work of Audigier 566568
566
Immense improvements introduced by Voltaire
575
His views adopted by Mallet Mably Velly Villaret Duclos
581
He weakened the authority of mere scholars and theologians
588
The discourses of Turgot and their influence
596
The intellect of France began to attack the state about 1750 602603
602
Abolition of the Jesuits
608
About the eleventh century the spirit of inquiry began to weaken
614
After the fall of the Jesuits the ruin of the French clergy was
617
But was averted for a time by the most eminent Frenchmen direct
618
And in Condillac
624
In England during the same period there was a dearth of great
636
Relation between inventions discoveries and method and immense
645
Great and successful efforts made by the French in botany 652654
652
All these vast results were part of the causes of the French Revolu
658
And in the establishment of clubs 664666
664
General reflections 670
670

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Halaman 335 - The storm has gone over me; and I lie like one of those old oaks which the late hurricane has scattered about me. I am stripped of all my honours, I am torn up by the roots, and lie prostrate on the earth!
Halaman 329 - In effect, to follow, not to force the public inclination ; to give a direction, a form, a technical dress, and a specific sanction, to the general sense of the community, is the true end of legislature.
Halaman 174 - But all who read (and most do read), endeavor to obtain some smattering in that science. I have been told by an eminent bookseller, that in no branch of his business, after tracts of popular devotion, were so many books as those on the law exported to the plantations.
Halaman 20 - In a given state of society, a certain number of persons must put an end to their own life. This is the general law; and the special question as to who shall commit the crime depends, of course, upon special laws; which, however, in their total action, must obey the large social law to which they are all subordinate. And the power of the larger law is so irresistible, that neither the love of life nor the fear of another world can avail anything towards even checking its operation.
Halaman 335 - I live in an inverted order. They who ought to have succeeded me have gone before me.' They who should have been to me as posterity are in the place of ancestors.
Halaman 313 - After the Revolution, the spirit of the nation became much more commercial, than it had been before ; a learned body, or clerisy, as such, gradually disappeared, and literature in general began to be addressed to the common miscellaneous public. That public had become accustomed to, and required, a strong stimulus ; and to meet the requisitions of the public taste, a style was produced which by combining triteness of thought with singularity and excess of manner of expression, was calculated at once...
Halaman 333 - ... necessary to consider distinctly the true nature and the peculiar circumstances of the object which we have before us: because, after all our struggle, whether we will or not, we must govern America according to that nature and to those circumstances, and not according to our own imaginations...
Halaman 374 - ... chacun appelle barbarie ce qui n'est pas de son usage ; comme de vray, il semble que nous n'avons autre mire de la vérité et de la raison que l'exemple et idée des opinions et usances du païs où nous sommes. Là est tousjours la parfaicte religion, la parfaicte police, perfect et accomply usage de toutes choses.
Halaman 129 - To do good to others ; to sacrifice for their benefit your own wishes ; to love your neighbour as yourself; to forgive your enemies; to restrain your passions; to honour your parents; to respect those who are set over you : these, and a few others, are the sole essentials of morals; but they have been known for thousands of years, and not one jot or tittle has been added to them by all the sermons, homilies, and text-books which moralists and theologians have been able to produce.
Halaman 163 - The actions of bad men produce only temporary evil, the actions of good men only temporary good ; and eventually the good and the evil altogether subside, are nentralized by subsequent generations, absorbed by the incessant movement of future ages.

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