Gambar halaman
PDF
ePub

No. 256.

PERSONAL CONSUMPTION EXPENDITURES FOR RECREATION: 1940 to 1958 [In millions of dollars. Represents market value of purchases of goods and services by individuals and nonprofit institutions. Not adjusted to include Alaska and Hawaii. See also Historical Statistics, Colonial Times to 1957, series H 500-515)

TYPE OF PRODUCT OR SERVICE

Total recreation expenditures..
Books and maps..
Magazines, newspapers, and sheet music..
Nondurable toys and sport supplies..
Wheel goods, durable toys, sport equip-
ment, boats, and pleasure aircraft.
Radio and television receivers, records, and
musical instruments...

Radio and television repair..
Flowers, seeds, and potted plants..
Admissions to specified spectator amuse-

ments..

Motion picture theaters.

Legitimate theaters and opera, and enter. tainments of nonprofit institutions (except athletics).

Spectator sports..

Clubs and fraternal organizations 1.
Commercial participant amusements 2
Pari-mutuel net receipts..

Other 1..

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

1 Gross receipts less cash benefits of fraternal, patriotic, and women's organizations except insurance; and dues and fees of athletic, social, and luncheon clubs, and school fraternities.

44

68

76

42

* Billiard parlors, bowling alleys, dancing, riding, shooting, skating, and swimming places, amusement devices and parks, daily fee golf course greens fees, golf instruction, club rental, and caddy fees, sightseeing buses and guides, and private flying operations.

Photo developing and printing, photographic studios, collectors' net acquisitions of stamps and coins, hunting dog purchase and training, sports guide service, veterinary service, purchase of pets, camp fees, nonvending coin machine receipts minus payoff, and other commercial amusements.

Source: Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics; National Income Supplement, 1954, U.S. Income and Output, a supplement to the Survey of Current Business, and Survey of Current Business, July 1959.

8243

41

60

No. 257. Volume and CharacteristicS OF TRAVEL: 1957

[Covers civilian, noninstitutional population excluding Alaska and Hawail. Excludes trips to and from home locality by students attending college, 1-way travel of families permanently moving their residence, and occupational travel by pilots, engineers, bus drivers, etc. Data based on a sample of approximately 24,000 households, interviewed at the rate of about 2,000 each month as a part of Current Population Survey; see Technical Note, p. 203]

19 210

46 546

27 410

8 121

1940 1945 1950 1953 1954 3,761 6,139 11,278 12,892 13, 256 234 520 677 831 806 1,495 1,776 1,825

589

965

306

553

1,396

1,694

1,624

254

400

878

1,093

1, 174

494

344

2,457
281

2,608
428

2,741
475

32

88

201

378

524

675

687

TRIP DAYS 2

4

41

62
73

19

293

29 384

33 390
18 220

18 255
26 304

16

43

32

9

2345

82

904 1,714 1,775
735 1,450 1,367

5

71

98

[ocr errors]

203

197

55

292

23

30

30
17

20
24

Aver

age

days

per

trip

5.6

148

116

281

284

4.8

5.1

6.7

6.4

153

459

5.2

7.1

7.7 9.4

6.8

185

223

467

463

237

628

6.6

5.6

5. 1
5.2

1,594

1,172

6.2
5.0

200

222

525

545

367

756

1,660

1,210

Major

ITEM

225

225

549

565

362

788

destination
of trip-Con.
South...

West.
Outside U.S.

1955 1956 1957 1958 14, 220 15, 193 16,082 888 1,006 1, 149 1,917 1,954 2,087 1,842 2,008

2,094

1,397

1,575 1,760

2,792

2,872

3,000

522

585

652

721

770

824

Distance to major

destination:
Under 100 miles..
100 to 199 miles.
200 to 499 miles.

500 to 999 miles..
1,000 miles

1,700

1,744 1,662 1,217 1,228 1,120

and

over..
Outside U.S.....

Annual income of
family:
Under $3,000.
$3,000 to $5,999.
$6,000 to $9,999..
$10,000 and over..

[blocks in formation]

Num-
Num-
ber Per- ber Per- per
(mil- cent (mil- cent trip
lions)
lions)

TRIP DAYS 2

38 357

70 31 274

44

19 292

14

6 157

42

448 234 46

161

46

15 206

41 463

30 399

14

219

[ocr errors]

35

18
4

16,973 1, 199

2,210 2, 195

2222 21

1,972

3,098

720

815

28

21

1,736

1, 168

23

12

313

255

721

772

447

4

16

36

[ocr errors]

Aver

age days

Major destination

of trip: Northeast.. North Central....

1 A trip involves 1 person being out of town at least overnight or taking a 1-day round trip to a place that is at least 100 miles (1 way) away from home. A round trip starts and ends in the traveler's home locality. If 2 persons in the same household take a round trip together, it is counted as 2 round trips.

* Days spent away from home locality by 1 person on a round trip.

Includes both "direct business" in which the traveler goes principally for business reasons, and “indirect business" in which others in the household accompany the person who went for business purposes.

Includes Alaska, Hawaii, outlying areas, and foreign.

Source: Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census; Travel Survey-1957.

540262°-6014

5.6

5.3 8.6

6.0

4.9

5.8

6.8

No. 258. FOREIGN TRAVEL-NUMBER OF TRAVELERS AND EXPENDITURES: 1929 TO

-1958

[Travelers in thougands; expenditures in millions of dollars. Covers U.S. residents, including residents of Alaska,

Hawaii, and Puerto Rico

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

ఎంప అంబర్

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

South America..

5
4
10
22
29 37

37 Other...

14
12
13
13

54 Japan

()
O

22
26

29 Hong Kong

(?) (2)

8
9

13 Philippine Islands

() (0)

6
6

5 1 Excludes the following: Travel to Canada and Mexico; travel between the United States and Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands; cruise travelers; military personnel and other Government employees and their dependents stationed abroad; and U.S. citizens residing abroad. Detail will not add to total because many travelers visit more than one country. 2 Not available.

3 Includes shore expenditures of cruise travelers; excludes travel expenditures of military personnel and other Government employees and their dependents stationed abroad, and U.S. citizens residing abroad.

• Excludes passenger fares of emigrant aliens. Source: Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics; Survey of Current Business, and records.

No. 259. TRAVEL TO EUROPE AND THE MEDITERRANEAN AREA-NUMBER OF

TRAVELERS AND AVERAGE EXPENDITURE: 1950 TO 1958 [Travelers in thousands. Covers U.S. residents, including residents of Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico,

except as noted. For definitions of terms, see table 258)

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

I Not available.

Jacludes travelers using first-class accommodations costing less than $325. * Includes travelers using freighter, combination type, or tourist class accommodation. * Includes travelers using chartered planes. • Originated in April 1958. • Excludes transatlantic passenger fares. ? U.S. citizens only. Source: Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics; Survey of Current Business, and records.

No. 260. FOREIGN TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES—NUMBER OF TRAVELERS, 1955

to 1958, AND EXPENDITURES, 1947 to 1958 [Includes travelers for business and pleasure, foreigners in transit through the United States, and students; ex

cludes travel by foreign government personnel and foreign businessmen employed in the United States)

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

1 Not available. Source: Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics; Surrey of Current Business, and records.

[blocks in formation]

FIG. XV. TRENDS IN THE LABOR FORCE: 1947 TO 1959 [See table 263]

[subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors]

Source: Chart prepared by Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data for 1947-June 1959 are from Bureau of the Census; thereafter, Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

[graphic]

Section 8

Labor Force, Employment, and Earnings

[ocr errors]

This section presents statistics dealing with the characteristics of the economically active segment of the population, the labor force; its distribution by occupation and industry affiliation; and the supply of, demand for, and conditions of labor.

The chief sources of these data are the Bureau of the Census' Decennial Census of Population (see text, p. 1) and Current Population Survey (see text, p. 2); the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Employment and Earnings and Monthly Labor Review; and the Agricultural Marketing Service's monthly report, Farm Labor.

Statistics shown in this section are of two types. One type is obtained by the "population approach” represented by the Census of Population of the Bureau of the Census and the monthly labor force survey of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, for which data are collected by the Bureau of the Census as a part of the Current Population Survey. This approach involves direct enumeration and interrogation of individuals to obtain information on employment activity from workers or members of workers' households. Each employed worker is counted only once, even though he may have held two or more jobs during a given period.

The second type of data is obtained by the "establishment approach” represented by the industry surveys of the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the surveys of the Agricultural Marketing Service. These data are based on reports from employers, i.e., farms, businesses, or industrial establishments. Such data as wages, hours worked, labor turnover, and industry affiliation of employees can be more accurately obtained from employers' records than from inquiries directed to a worker or a member of his household. Workers appearing on more than one payroll for the same time period are counted more than once in establishment statistics.

The Decennial Census of Population provides detailed data for the United States, and for each State, city, and other area, including personal characteristics (sex, age, race, etc.) of the numbers employed and unemployed, the number reported in each occupation and in each industry, and other items. The labor force survey, conducted as a part of the Current Population Survey, provides current data published in Employment and Earnings and related publications series of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Data presented include national totals, by sex and age, of the number of persons in the civilian labor force, the number employed in nonagricultural industries and agriculture, the number unemployed, and the number of nonworkers. Also provided are data on hours of work and major occupation group of those employed and duration of unemployment of those unemployed.

In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics in Employment and Earnings provides detailed monthly data on employment, unemployment, payrolls, labor turnover, earnings, and hours. These data for broad groupings are shown in the Monthly Labor Review, which also presents statistics on wage rates, industrial relations, and output per man-hour. Although, for the most part, data are presented for the United States only, certain of these data are also shown for States and large cities.

Labor force.—The labor force data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of the Census include persons 14 years old and over who were employed, unemployed, or in the Armed Forces during a specified week. Employed persons are those who did any work for pay or profit during the week, or who worked without pay for 15 hours or more in a family enterprise (farm or business); also included are persons who did not work or look for work but who had a job or business from which

« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »