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the Institute of Technology under your leadership enjoy continued success, and may her sons in larger measure than ever before, be of real service to humanity.

CHANNING H. COX

Governor of Massachusetts

MASSACHUSETTS is small in area. She has not been able to supply large quantities of food to the rest of the world. Massachusetts is not rich in natural resources. She has not been able to furnish timber or to yield precious ores for other states. But to her glory Massachusetts has been rich in men capable of service, and these she has generously given to the world. Men have fared forth from Massachusetts carrying with them a love of civil and religious liberty. Men have gone forth from Massachusetts carrying with them an understanding of free institutions, and wherever they have settled, there they have been leaders in establishing and maintaining ordered government under law. Men have learned history in Massachusetts and they have been able to aid their fellow men in charting a future course in the light of past experience. Massachusetts was early to recognize the importance of science, and she has been zealous to offer to her sons every opportunity of technical training.

Today we have assembled at one of the great institutions of Massachusetts, a seat of learning where men have studied with serious purpose under skilled teachers, and from which they have gone forth well equipped to do large things for the welfare of the world. The Institute of Technology has brought prestige to Massachusetts. Her people rejoice in your strength, in your eminent faculty, in your superb buildings, in your endowment, in your mighty army of loyal alumni, and in the body of eager students coming here from all parts of the world. Massachusetts holds in tender regard those who have labored and sacrificed to make Technology strong and great. So devoted, so gifted have been the leaders of this great school that, when they have fallen one after another, it has seemed a task of the utmost difficulty to fill their places. Today we meet with rejoicing. A new leader has answered the call of duty and confidently we pledge our support to him who has so amply demonstrated his capacity as student, teacher, scientist, administrator, and as a redblooded leader of men. It is a particular satisfaction for me to have a brief part in these exercises, for one of the most pleasant recollections of my own college days is the course in physics which I took under your new president. No one could have such an opportunity and not be impressed with the wide learning and even more the high character and genuine human sympathy of Doctor Nichols.

So as the representative of the Commonwealth I welcome you, President Nichols, not only as the new head of this great institution which has contributed so richly to the good name of Massachusetts, but in these days of confusion I welcome you into the life of Massachusetts, knowing you to be a right-thinking public-spirited citizen. May

been recognized and supported as it has deserved. It has achieved on its merits the foremost place among the engineering schools of the country, and under your guidance, President Nichols, we trust that it will retain and enlarge the reputation it has so justly won.

HENRY P. TALBOT, '85

Chairman of the Faculty and of the Administrative Committee

Ir is my great privilege to extend to you, Mr. President, on behalf of the Faculty of the Institute a message of welcome. We believe that, at least in fundamental essentials, we bid you welcome to a “house in order". It is a structure planned by many minds and erected by many hands, and it seems fitting to review very briefly some of the significant achievements and conditions, particularly of the last decade, which have determined its present form and will determine its fitness to meet the needs of the future. It is indeed, a far cry from the simple rooms, almost without equipment, on Summer Street, Boston, in which the Institute, with its fifteen students, had its beginnings, to the present imposing and efficient educational plant with its extensive technical facilities. Of the present Faculty, one member, Prof. R. H. Richards, links us with the Institute's entire past, for he has witnessed the erection of the Rogers Building, then the Walker Building, later a group of buildings, and finally the present plant. By way of contrast, it is of interest to note that with the advent of the Class of 1924 last October there began at the Institute a student-generation to whom the associations which must always cluster about Rogers steps in the memories of many here today are quite unknown. But within the present wholesome student life there are forming new traditions and customs centering about new spots, which in time will have the same sanctity as the Rogers steps of old, and we of today delight to pay deserved tribute to the unprecedented generosity of our friends, among whom the name of Eastman must ever stand pre-eminent, to the inspiring leadership and devotion of the late President Maclaurin, and to the loyal support of the Alumni, all of which made possible the facilities for educational and scientific service and development with which we are surrounded. We should, however, also pay a tribute of grateful recollection to the courage of those members of the Corporation, past and present, whose faith was strongest when funds were most scarce, and to those members of the Faculty who made great personal sacrifices at a time when the very existence of the Institute was conditioned upon such help. The buildings which they provided and planned may have vanished, but the successes of today and those to which we look forward with confidence for the morrow are, nevertheless, inspired and made possible because of their devotion. We realize that our heritage from the past is great, and the privileges of the present are such as to impose upon us great responsibilities.

The last decade has offered to educational institutions unprecedented opportunities to test their ability to serve civilization, industry, and the Nation in a time of great crises. The test of the war was searching

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