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CLASSIFICATION OF THE COUNTIES OF PENNSYLVANIA

CENSUS 1920.

FIRST CLASS COUNTY:

Philadelphia.

Chester.
Clearfield.
Lehigh.
Northumberland.
York.

SECOND CLASS COUNTY:

Allegheny.

Centre.
Clarion.
Clinton.
Columbia.
Elk.
Greene.
Huntingdon.
McKean.
Mifflin.
Monroe.
Perry.
Potter.
Susquehanna.
Tioga.
Warren.
Wayne.

THIRD CLASS COUNTIES: SIXTH CLASS COUNTIES:
Lackawanna.

Armstrong.
Luzerne.

Bradford.
Westmoreland.

Bucks.
Butler,

Carbon.
FOURTH CLASS COUNTIES: Crawford.
Berks.

Cumberland. Cambria.

Franklin. Dauphin.

Indiana. Delaware.

Jefferson. Erie.

Lawrence. Fayette.

Lebanon. Lancaster.

Lycoming. Montgomery.

Mercer. Northhampton.

Somerset. Schuylkill.

Venango. Washington.

EIGHTH CLASS
COUNTIES:

Cameron.
Forest.
Fulton.
Juniata.
Montour.
Pike.
Snyder.
Sullivan.
Union.
Wyoming.

FIFTH CLASS COUNTIES: SEVENTH CLASS
Beaver.

COUNTIES:
Blair.

Adams.
Bedford.

*ACT CLASSIFYING THE CITIES OF PENNSYLVANIA.

AN ACT

Dividing the cities of this state into three classes with respect to their population, and desig.

nating the mode of ascertaining and changing the classification thereof in accordance therewith.

Section 1. Be it enacted, &c., That for the purpose of legislation, regulating their municipal affairs, the exercise of certain corporate powers and having respect to the number, character, powers and duties of certain officers thereof, the cities now in existence and those hereafter created in this Commonwealth shall be divided into three classes :

Those containing a population of one 'million or over shall constitute the first class.

Those containing a population of one hundred and twenty-five thousand and under one million, shall constitute the second class.

Those containing a population under one hundred and twenty-five thousand, shall constitute the third class.

Section 2. The classification of said cities respectively shall be ascertained and fixed by reference to their population according to the last preceding United States census, and whenever it shall appear by any such census that any city of the second or third class has attained a population entitling it to an advance in classification as herein prescribed, it shall be the duty of the Governor, under the great seal of this Commonwealth, to certify the fact accordingly, which certificate shall be entered at large upon the minutes of the councils of such city, and recorded in the office for recording the deeds of the proper county. At the municipal election occurring not less than one month after the date of such certificate, the proper officers shall be elected to which the said city will become entitled under the change in classification, and upon the first Monday of †April next ensuing, the terms of all officers of said city then in office whose officers are superseded by reason thereof shall cease and determine, and the city government shall be duly organized, and shall thereafter be controlled and regulated by the laws of this Commonwealth applicable to the same under the classification hereby fixed and appointed. (Act of June 25, 1895, P. L. 275; as amended by Act of May 24, 1921, P. L. 1064).

•By the Acts of May 28, 1907, P. L. 268, and May 13, 1915, P. L. 306, cities of the third class shall be chartered whenever a majority of the electors of any town, township, or borough, or any two or more contiguous towns, townships, or boroughs, situate within the limits of the same county or situate in two or more contiguous counties, and having together a population of at least ten thousand, according to the last preceding United States census, shall each separately vote at any election in favor of the same; and by the Act of July 22, 1919, P. L. 1113, à method is provided whereby cities of the third class may surrender their charters and become boroughs.

* By the Act approved March 2, 1911, P. L. 9, the terms of all city officers begin on the first Monday of January in even numbered years succeeding their election.

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(By the act of July 14, 1917, the townships of Pennsylvania having a population of three hundred or more to the square mlle are made townships of the first class, all other townships being Classified as townships of the second class.)

The following is the list of Townships of the First Class to January 1, 1922:
ALLEGHENY COUNTY : BEAVER COUNTY :

LEHIGH COUNTY:
Baldwin,
Borough,

Whitehall.
Braddock,

Patterson.
Collier,

LUZERNE COUNTY:
Orescent,
BUTLER COUNTY:

Hanover,
East Deer,
Butler.

Newport.
Elizabeth,

Plains.
Harrison,
CAMBRIA COUNTY:

Wilkes-Barre.
Jefferson,

Stony Creek.
Leet,

MONTGOMERY COUNTY :
Lower St. Clair,
DAUPHIN COUNTY:

Abington,
Within
Swatara.

Cheltenham,
Mt. Lebanon,

Lower Merion,
Neville,

Plymouth,
North Versailles,

DELAWARE COUNTY :
Aston,

Springfield,
O'Hara,
Darby,

West Pottsgrove.
Penn,

Haverford,
Reserve,

Lower Chichester,

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY :
Ross,

Coal,
Scott,

Nether Providence,

Radnor,
Shaler,

WASHINGTON COUNTY:
South Fayette,
Ridley,

East Bethlehem.
South Versailles,

Tinicum,
Springdale,

Upper Darby.

YORK COUNTY:
Stowe,
LACKAWANNA COUNTY:

Spring Garden.
Union,

Lackawanna.
Wikino.

LEBANON COUNTY :

Annville,
West Lebanon.

NUMBER OF CONGRESSMEN AND PRESIDENTIAL ELECT

ORS TO WHICH EACH STATE IS ENTITLED.

The whole number of representatives in Congress 18 435, apportioned among the several States as shown in the first column. The number of Presidential electoral votes to which each State 18 entitled is given in the second column.

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Alabama,
Arizona,
Arkansas,
Callfornia,
Colorado,
Connecticut,
Delaware,
Florida,
Georgia,
Idabo,
Tilinols,
Indlana.
Iowa,
Kansas,
Kentucky,
Louisiana,
Malde,
Maryland,
Massachusetts,
Michigan,
Minnesota,
Migsissippi,
Missouri,
Mostara,
Nebraska,
Nevada,
New Hampshire,
New Jersey,
New Mexico,
Now York,
North Carolna,
North Dakota,
Oblo,
Ołaboma,
Oregon,
Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island,
South Oarolna,
South Dakota,
Tennessee,
Texas,
Utah,
Vermont,
Virginla,
Washlogton,
West Virginia,
Wisconshu.
Wyoming,

29 15 13 10 18 10 6 8 18 15 12 10 18 { S

10 18 10

8 16 2 6 1 2 12

1 48 10

8 22 8

14

8 45 12 5

10

B 88

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Total,

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Electoral votes necessary to a choice. 266.

CONGRESSIONAL APPORTIONMENT.

Act of Congress for the apportionment of Representatives in Congress among the

several States under the Thirteenth Census, approved August 8, 1911. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That after the third day of March, nineteen hundred and thirteen, the House of Representatives shall be composed of four hundred and thirty-three Members, to be apportioned among the several States as follows: Alabama, ten; Arkansas, seven; California, eleven ; Colorado, four; Connecticut, five; Delaware, one; Florida, four; Georgia, twelve; Idaho, two; Illinois, twenty-seven; Indiana, thirteen; Iowa, eleven; Kansas, eight; Kentucky, eleven; Louisiana, eight; Maine, four; Maryland, six; Massachusetts, sixteen ; Michigan, thirteen; Minnesota, ten; Mississippi, eight; Missouri, sixteen; Montana, two; Nebraska, six; Nevada, cne; New Hampshire, two; New Jersey, twelve; New York, forty-three; North Carolina, ten; North Dakota, three; Chio, twenty-two; Oklahoma, eight; Oregon, three; Pennsylvania, thirty-six; Rhode Island, three; South Carolina, seven; South Dakota, three; Tennessee, ten; Texas, eighteen; Utah, two; Vermont, two; Virginia, ten; Washington, five; West Virginią, six; Wisconsin, eleven ; Wyoming, one.

Section 2. That if the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico shall become States in the Union before the apportionment of Representatives under the next decennial census they shall have one Representative each and if one of such Territories shall so become a State, such State shall have one Representative, which Representative or Representatives shall be in addition to the number four hundred and thirty-three, as provided in section one of this Act, and all laws and parts of laws in conflict with this section are to that extent hereby repealed.

Section 3. That in each State entitled under this apportionment to more than one Representative, the Representatives to the Sixty-third and each subsequent Congress shall be elected by districts composed of a contiguous and compact territory, and containing as nearly as practicable an equal number of inhabitants. The said districts shall be equal to the number of Representatives to which such State may be entitled in Congress, no district electing more than one Representative.

Section 4. That in case of an increase in the number of Representatives in any State under this apportionment such additional Representative or Representatives shall be elected by the State at large and the other Representatives by the districts now prescribed by law until such State shall be redistricted in the anner provided by the laws thereof and ir accordance with the rules enumerated in section three of this Act: and if there be no change in the number of Representatives from a State, the Representatives thereof shall be elected from the districts now prescribed by law until such State shall be redistricted as herein prescribed.

That ndidates for Representative or Representatives to be elected at large in any State shall be nominated in the same manner as candidates for Governor, unless otherwise provided by the laws of such State.

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