Lessons in Elocution: Or, A Selection of Pieces, in Prose and Verse, for the Improvement of Youth in Reading and Speaking. To which are Prefixed, Elements of Gesture. Illustrated by Four Plates; and Rules for Expressing with Propriety the Various Passions, &c. of the Mind. Also, an Appendix, Containing Lessons on a New Plan

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Lincoln & Edmands, 1819 - 360 halaman
 

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Rastic felicity ibid
18
pal passions and humors which occur in read
22
Falstaffs soliloquy on honour
23
Walker
38
SECTION 1
48
The two bees
56
Will Honeycombs Spectator
63
Address to a young student Knox
69
SECTION II
75
House of mourning e ibid
98
SECTION 11
100
Character of Addison as a writer johnson
101
Spectator 5 Sir Roger de Coverlys familż ibid
102
The folly of inconsistent expectations Aitkert
106
Description of the vale of Keswick in Cumberland Brown
108
Pity an allegory Aitken
111
Advantages of Commerce Spectator
112
On publio speaking ibid
114
Advantages of history Hume
116
On the immortality of the soul Spectator
118
On pedantry Mirror
124
The journey of a daya picture of human life Rambler
126
SECTION IV
129
Reflections in Westminster Abbey Spactator 3 The character of Mary queen of Scots Robertson
133
The character of queen Elizabeth Hume
134
Charies Vs resignation of his dominions Robertson
136
Importance of virtue Price
139
Address to art Harris
140
Flattery Theophrastus
142
The absent man Spectator
143
The Monk Sterne
144
On the present and future state ibid
149
Uncle Tobys bevevolence Sterne 151
151
14 Story of the siege of Calais Fool of Quality
152
SECTION V
156
On grace in writing Fitzbornes Letters 2 On the structure of animals Spectator
157
On natural and fantastical pleasures Guardian
160
The folly and madness of ambition illustrated World
164
Battle of Pharsalia and the death of Pompey Goldsmith
167
Character of king Alfred n Hume
172
Virtue mans highest interest Harris
173
On the pleasure arising from objects of sight Spectator
175
Liberty and slavery Sterne
177
The cant of Criticism ibid
178
A panegyrick on great Britain Thomson
201
Hymn to the Deity on the seasons of the year ibid
203
SECTION VII
206
On the order of nature Pope
207
Description of a country alebouse Goldsvaith 4 Character of a country schoolmaster ibid 5 Story of Palemon and Layinia Thomson
209
6 Celadon and Amelia ibid
212
Description of Mab queen of the Faries Shakespeare
213
On the existence of a Deitż Young 9 Evening in Paradise described Milton
214
Elegy written in a country churchyard Gray
216
Scipio restoring the captive lady to her lover Thomson
218
Humorous complaint to Dr Arbuthnot of the impertinence of scribblers
220
Hymn to adversity
221
The passionsAn ode Collins 192
222
On happiness
249
SECTION III
264
208
268
Caius Marius to the Romans
276
Demosthenes to the Athenians i
289
Jupiter to the inferior deities Homer
294
Ęneas to queen Dido Virgil 14 Moloch to the infernal powers Milton
296
Speech of Belial advising peace o ibid
298
SECTION V
299
Lady Townly and lady Grace Provoked husband
301
Priuli and Jaffier Venice Preserved 4 Boniface and Aimwell Beaux Stratagem
307
Lovegold and Lappet Miser 6 Cardinal Wolsey and Cromwell Henry VIII
313
Sir Charles and Lady Racket Three Weeks after Marriage
316
Shakespeares Julius Cęsar 319
319
Hamlets advice to the players Tragedy of Hamlet
322
Douglass account of himself Tragedy of Douglass
323
the hermit ibid
324
Lucius speech for peace ibid
325
1 Henry the wv ib 7 soliloquy on the contents of a letter ibid 8 Othellos apology for his marriage Tragedy of Othello
327
Henry IVs soliloquy on sleep 2 Henry the IV
328
Soliloquy of Hamlets uncle on the murder of his brother Tragedy of Hamlet
329
Soliloquy of Hamlet on death
330
Falstaffs encomiums on sack 2 Henry the IV
331
Tragedy of Cato
332
Lady Randolphs soliloquy Tragedy of Douglass
333
Speech of Henry V _at the siege of Harfleur Shakespeares Henry V ib before the Battle of Agincourt ibid
334
Soliloquy of Dick the apprentice Farce the apprentice
335
Cassius instigating Brutus to join the e conspiracy against Cęsar Tragedy of Julius Cęsar
336
Brutus harangue on the death of Cęsar ibid
337
Antonys oration oger Cęsars body ibrid
338

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Halaman 184 - Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole. What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball?
Halaman 332 - Help me, Cassius, or I sink.' I, as ./Eneas, our great ancestor, Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder The old Anchises bear ; so, from the waves of...
Halaman 185 - The sober herd that low'd to meet their young ; The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school ; The watch-dog's voice that bay'd the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind ; These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And fill'd each pause the nightingale had made.
Halaman 325 - Pray can I not, Though inclination be as sharp as will, My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent, And, like a man to double business bound, I stand in pause where I shall first begin, And both neglect. What if this cursed hand Were thicker than itself with brother's blood, Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens To wash it white as snow?
Halaman 311 - Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee; Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's; then if thou fall'st, O Cromwell, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr.
Halaman 323 - Their dearest action in the tented field; And little of this great world can I speak, More than pertains to feats of broil and battle ; And therefore little shall I grace my cause In speaking for myself. Yet, by your gracious patience...
Halaman 229 - And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton, All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride On horseback after we.
Halaman 333 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers ! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear : believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe : censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Halaman 324 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge ; And in the visitation of the winds, "Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deaf'ning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly * death itself awakes...
Halaman 332 - Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together, yours is as fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em, Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.

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