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161. Avoid in all cases the use of the word "mechanic," but give the exact occupation, as carpenter, painter, machinist, etc.

162. Distinguish carefully the different kinds of "agents" by stating in column 19 the line of business followed.

163. Distinguish carefully between retail and wholesale merchants, as retail merchantdry-goods; wholesale merchantdry-goods.

164. Avoid the use of the word "clerk" wherever a more definite occupation can be named. Thus a person in a store, often called a clerk, who is wholly or principally engaged in selling goods should be called a salesman. A stenographer, typewriter, accountant, bookkeeper, or cashier, etc., should be reported as such, and not as a clerk.

165. Distinguish a traveling salesman from a salesman in a store; the former preferably should be reported as a commercial traveler.

166. If any person in answer to the occupation question says that he is "in business," you must find out what branch of business and what kind of work he does or what position he holds.

167. Illustrations of occupations.—The following examples, in addition to the occupations given in the illustrative schedule, will illustrate the method of returning some of the common occupations and industries; they will also suggest to you distinctions which you should make in other cases:

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farm laborer

farm laborer

laborer

laborer

laborer

laborer

laborer

brakeman

weaver

laborer

d offer

engineer

engineer

fireman

fireman

civil engineer

electrical engineer

carpenter

carpenter

carpenter

blacksmith

blacksmith

agent

agent

cook

servant

retail merchant

wholesale merchant

working out home farm odd jobs street work garden nursery railroad railroad cotton mill cotton mill cotton mill locomotive lumber mill lumber mill fire department general practice street railway

car factory ship yard house

carriage factory own shop real estate insurance hotel

private family groceries leather

commercial traveler

salesman

bookkeeper

cash girl

cashier

cashier

conductor

conductor

farmer

farmer

gardener

lawyer

manager

overseer

president

president

superintendent steel

works

foreman

newsboy

newsdealer

wagon driver

wagon driver

chauffeur

chauffeur

miner

laborer

quarryman

janitor

dry goods department store department store department store department store bank

steam railroad street car general farm truck farm private estates general practice general farm truck farm life insurance co. bank

cotton mill

street

store

groceries

express

express wagon

private family

coal miner

coal mine

marble

house

EMPLOYER, EMPLOYEE, OR WORKING ON OWN
ACCOUNT

168. Column 20. Whether employer, employee, or working
on own account. For one employing persons, other

than domestic servants, in transacting his own busi- 1 70.
ness, write "Emp" (for employer). For a person who
works for wages or a salary, write "W" (for wage-
earner). For a gainful worker who is neither an
employer nor an employee, write "OA" (for own
account). For all persons returned as having no occu-
pation, leave the column blank.

169. Employer. An employer is one who employs help-
ers, other than domestic servants, in transacting his 171.
own business. The term employer does not include

the superintendent, agent, manager, or other person
employed to manage an establishment or business;
and it does not include the foreman of a room, the
boss of a gang, or the coal miner who hires his
helper. All such should be returned as employees, for,
while any one of these may employ persons, none of

them does so in transacting his own business. Thus no individual working for a corporation either as an officer or otherwise should be returned as an employer.

A person employing domestic servants in his own home but not employing any helpers in his business should not be returned as an employer. But, on the other hand, a person who is the proprietor of a hotel or boarding or lodging house and employs servants in running that hotel or boarding or lodging house should be returned as an employer, because he employs these servants in his business.

Employee.—Any person who works for wages or a salary and is subject to the control and direction of an employer, is an employee, whether he be president of a large corporation or only a day laborer, whether he be paid in money or in kind, and whether he be employed by his own parent or by another. The term employee does not include lawyers, doctors, and others who render professional services for fees,

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and who, in their work, are not subject to the control and direction of those whom they serve. It does include actors, professors, and others who are engaged to render professional services for wages or salaries. A domestic servant should always be returned as an employee even though, as previously explained, the person employing a domestic servant is not always returned as an employer.

172. Working on own account.—Persons who have a gainful occupation and are neither employers nor employees are considered to be working on their own account. They are the independent workers. They neither pay nor receive salaries or regular wages. Examples of this class are: Farmers and the owners of small establishments who do not employ helpers; professional men who work for fees and employ no helpers; and, generally speaking, hucksters, peddlers, newsboys, boot-blacks, etc., although it not infrequently happens that persons in these pursuits are employed by others and are working for wages, and in such case should, of course, be returned as employees.

173. Illustrative examples.—In many occupations a man may be either an employer, or an employee, or working on own account. For example, a physician is working on his own account if, as explained above, he works for fees solely and employs no helpers; if, however, he employs an assistant in his office he becomes an employer; but if he works for a salary, say in a hospital or institution, he is an employee. It may happen, however, that he receives a salary and also works for fees, in which case he should be classed with respect to his principal source of income.

174. A dressmaker who works out by the day for day wages should be returned as an employee; but a dressmaker who works at home or in her own shop should be returned as working on own account, unless she employs helpers, in which case she becomes an employer.

1 75. Similarly, a washerwoman or laundress who works out by the day is an employee, but a washerwoman or laundress who takes in washing is either working on own account, or, it may be, is an employer.

1 76. Case of wife working for husband or child working for parents.—When, in accordance with the preceding instructions, a wife working for her husband or a child working for its parents is returned as having an occupation, the wife or child should be returned as an employee, even though not receiving wages. The husband or parent in such case should be returned as an employer, unless, as may happen, he is working for wages, in which case he, as well as the wife or child, should be classed as an employee.

UNEMPLOYMENT

1 77. What is meant by "out of work."—The purpose of inquiries 21 and 22 is to ascertain the amount of enforced unemployment—the extent to which persons want work and can not find it. Do not, therefore, include with those "out of work" those who are on a strike, those who are voluntarily idle, those who are incapacitated for any work, or those who are on sick leave or on a vacation. School-teachers, artists, and music teachers are often unemployed during a portion of the year, but should not be considered as "out of work," in the sense in which the term is used for the purposes of the census.

178. Column 21. If an employee, whether out of work on April 1 5, 1910.—If a person reported as an employee (W) in column 20 was out of work on April 15, 1910, write "Yes;" but if such person had work on that date, write "No." For persons other than employees, leave the column blank.

179. Column 22. If an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909.—If a person reported as an employee (W) in column 20 was out of work during any part of the year 1909, enter the number of weeks out of work; but if such person was not out of work at all during the year, do not leave the column blank, but write "0." For persons other than employees, leave the column blank.

180. Person not employed at his principal or usual occupation but engaged in some side or temporary work is not to be considered as unemployed, the intent of this question being to find out the number of weeks during which the person was unable to secure any employment.

EDUCATION

181. Column 23. Whether able to read.—Write "Yes" for all persons 10 years of age and over who can read any language, whether English or some other, and "No" for all such persons who can not read any language. For persons under 10 years of age, leave the column blank.

182. For a person reported as "blind" (column 31), write "Yes" if he could read any language before becoming blind or, if born blind, if he has been taught to read any language.

183. Column 24. Whether able to write.—Write "Yes" for all persons 10 years of age and over who can write any language, whether English or some other, and "No" for all such persons who can not write any language. For persons under 10 years of age, leave the column blank.

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184. For a person reported as "blind" (column 31), write "Yes" if he could write any language before becoming blind or, if born blind, if he has been taught to write any language.

185. Column 25. Attended school any time since September 1, 1909.—Write "Yes" for any person who attended school, college, or any educational institution at any time since September 1, 1909, and "No" for any person of school age—5 to 21 years—who has not attended school since that date. For persons below or above school age, leave the column blank, unless they actually attended school.

OWNERSHIP OF HOME

186. Column 26. Home owned or rented.—This question is to be answered only opposite the name of the head of each family. If a dwelling is occupied by more than one family it is the home of each of them, and the question should be answered with reference to each family in the dwelling. If the home is owned, write opposite the name of the head of the family "O." If the home is rented, write "R." Make no entries in this column for the other members of the family.

187. Owned homes.—A home is to be classed as owned if it is owned wholly or in part by the head of the family living in the home, or by the wife of the head, or by a son, or a daughter, or other relative living in the same house with the head of the family. It is not necessary that full payment for the property should have been made or that the family should be the sole owner.

1 88. Rented homes.—Every home not owned, either

wholly or in part, by the family living in it should be classed as rented, whether rent is actually paid or not.

1 89. Column 27. Home owned free or mortgaged.—This question applies only to those homes classed in column 26 as owned homes and not to rented homes. Write "M" for mortgaged and "F" for owned free. These entries should be made opposite the name of the head of the family. All owned homes which are not fully paid for, or upon which there is any encumbrance in the form either of a mortgage or of a lien upon which judgment has been had in a court, are to be reported as mortgaged.

190. Column 28. Farm or house.— This column is

intended merely to distinguish farm homes from other homes. If the home is a farm home, write "F" (for farm) opposite the name of the head of the family. If it is not a farm home, write "H" (for house). A farm home is a home located on a farm, for which a farm schedule should be secured. Any other home is to be reported simply as a house.

191. Column 29. Number of farm schedule.—This question applies only to farm homes. If the home is a farm home, enter in this column simply the number of the agricultural schedule filled out for this farm. Make this entry opposite the name of the member of the family operating the farm. Usually this will be the head of the family.

SURVIVORS OF THE CIVIL WAR

192. Column 30. Whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy.—This question should be asked as to all males over 50 years of age who were born in the United States and all foreign born males who immigrated to this country before 1865. Write "UA" if a survivor of the Union Army; "UN" if a survivor of the Union Navy; "CA" if a survivor of the Confederate Army; and "CN" if a survivor of the Confederate Navy. For all other persons leave the column blank.

BUND AND DEAF AND DUMB PERSONS

193. Column 31. Whether blind (both eyes).—If a person is either totally or partially blind, in both eyes, so as not to be able to read even with the help of glasses, write "Bl." For all other persons leave the column blank.

194. Columns 32. Whether deaf and dumb.—If a person is both deaf and dumb, write "DD." For all other persons leave the column blank. Persons who are deaf but not dumb, or persons who are dumb but not deaf, are not to be reported.

SPECIAL INDIAN SCHEDULE

195. When to be used.—This schedule (Form 8 1857) is a modified form of the general population schedule; it is to be used principally for the enumeration of Indians living on reservations or in tribal relations, and also by the enumerators in certain counties containing a considerable number of Indians.

196. If any copies of this schedule are enclosed in the portfolio for your district, you are required to enumerate thereon all Indian families living in your district, in accordance with the instructions printed upon the schedule itself.

1910 QUESTIONNAIRE—INDIAN POPULATION

(23* X 16", printed on two sides, space for 20 entries on each side, reverse side contained continuation of instructions. The top of the questionnaire contained questions 1-28 which were identical with those on the general schedule.)

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INSTRUCTION FOR ENUMERATORS
INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING THIS SCHEDULE

This modified form of the general schedule for population
is to be used in making the enumeration of Indians, both
those on reservations and those living in family groups out-
side of reservations.

Detached Indians living either in white or negro families outside of reservations should be enumerated on the general population schedule (Form 8-1 589) as members of the families in which they are found; but detached whites or negroes living in Indian families should be enumerated on this special Indian schedule as members of the Indian families in which they are found. In other words, every family composed mainly of Indians should be reported entirely on this special schedule, and every family composed mainly of persons not Indians should be reported entirely on the general population schedule.

Spaces are provided for entries for 20 persons on each side (A and B) of the sheet, the entries for each person running twice to the page. Columns 1 to 46 are to be filled for each individual case, if applicable, according to the instructions.

Columns 1 to 32.—These columns are identical with those on the general population schedule. Fill each column, so far as the inquiry applies, in accordance with the instructions for filling the corresponding column in the general population schedule, but note the following additional instructions in relation to filling columns 1 and 2, column 7, and columns 18 and 19.

Columns 1 and 2. Visitation numbers.—If, in canvassing a given territory, you are using both the general population schedule (Form 8-1 589) and this schedule for Indian population, make two independent series of numbers for these columns, one series in each kind of schedule, so that the last number in column 1 on this schedule added to the last number in column 1 on the general population schedule will give the whole number of dwellings visited, and, likewise, the last number in column 2 on this schedule added to the last number in column 2 on the general population schedule will give the whole number of families visited and enumerated in your district.

Column 7. Age at last birthday.—Some difficulty may be met in ascertaining the exact ages of Indians, as they frequently reckon their ages from notable events occurring in the history of the respective tribes. Endeavor to ascertain the years in which these notable events occurred, and with a little calculation on your part you should be able to ascertain the exact age of each Indian.

Columns 18 and 19. Occupation. If the Indian is wholly self-supporting, enter his or her occupation in columns 18 and 1 9 in accordance with the general instructions for returning occupations. If the Indian—man, woman, or child—has no occupation and is wholly dependent on the Government for support, write "Ration Indian" in column

18. If the Indian is partly self-supporting and partly depen-
dent up the Government, write the occupation in columns
1 8 and 19, and then the letter "R" (for ration).

INSTRUCTIONS CONTINUED ON "B" SIDE
OF SHEET INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILLING THIS
SCHEDULE CONTINUED FROM "A" SIDE OF SHEET

The following instructions apply to columns 33 to 46:

Columns 33, 34, and 35. Tribal relations. If the Indian was born in this country answers should be obtained, if possible, to inquiries 12, 13, and 14, relating to the state or territory of birth of the person and of his or her parents. In any event, take particular pains to secure the name of the tribe with which the person is connected and the name of the tribe of each of his or her parents, and enter the same in columns 33, 34, and 35.

Columns 36, 37, and 38. Proportions of Indian and other blood.—If the Indian is a full-blood, write "full" in column 36, and leave columns 37 and 38 blank. If the Indian is of mixed blood, write in column 36, 37, and 38 the fractions which show the proportions of Indian and other blood, as (column 36, Indian) 3/4, (column 37, white) 1/4, and (column 38, negro) 0. For Indians of mixed blood all three columns should be filled, and the sum, in each case, should equal 1, as 1/2, 0, 1/2; 3/4, 1/4, 0; 3/4, 1/8, 1/8; etc. Wherever possible, the statement that an Indian is of full blood should be verified by inquiry of the older men of the tribe, as an Indian is sometimes of mixed blood without knowing it.

Column 39. Number of times married.—If the Indian is married, enter in this column the number of times he or she has been married.

Column 40. Whether now living in polygamy.—If the Indian man is living with more than one wife, write "Yes" in this column; otherwise, write "No."

Column 41. If living in polygamy, whether the wives are sisters.—If the Indian man is living with more than one wife, and if his wives are sisters, write "Yes" in this column. If his wives are not sisters, write "No."

Column 42. Graduated from what educational institution.—If the Indian is a graduate of any educational institution, give the name and location of such institution.

Column 43. Is this Indian taxed?—An Indian is to be considered "taxed" if he or she is detached from his or her tribe and is living among white people as an individual, and as such is subject to taxation (whether he or she actually pays taxes or not); or if he or she is living with his or her tribe but has received an allotment of land, and thereby has acquired citizenship. In either of these two cases write "Yes" in this column.

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