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Laws prohibiting the Introduction of English Manufactures into Holland, France,

and Spain. "Adhesion of the Genoese to the French. Evacuation of Corsica.

Peace conclud.d with Naples and Parma. Negotiations with the Pope.

Pormation of the Cispadane Republic. Attack of the French on Newfound-

land. Capture of the Dutch Fleet at the Cape of Good Hope. Defeat of the

Imperialists at Neuwied. Battle of Arcole. Defeat of General Alvinzi. State

of Finances: Regulations respecting the List of Emigrants. Refudal of the

Direflory to admit the American A.n.bassador. Recall of the French Am-

baffador from the United States. Negotiation of the English Government

with the Directory for Peace. Failure of the Negotiation. Affairs of

Holland. Failure of the projected Descent of the French on Ireland. The

Pope forms an Alliance with the Emperor of Germany, and makes svarlike

Preparations. Formation of the confederated Cities South of the Po into one

Republic. Conflitution of Geneva. Siece of Kehl. Gallantry of the French

General Defaix, Surrender of Kehl. Reflections on the Campaign. Gene-

ral State of Europe. Death of the Empress of Ruffia. Chncluding 016-

fervations,

260

PRINCIPAL OCCURRENCES, (3)

P U BLIC P A P E RS.

Resolutions respecting a Negotiation with the French Republic, moved in the

House of Commons, by MinGrey, Feb. 15, 1796,

(82)

Resolutions concerning the Public Expenditure, moved in the House o;* Commons,
on the 7th of May, 1796, by Mr. Grey,

(ibid.)

Rofolutions concerning the Public Expenditure, moved in the House of Lords, ont

ike 2d of May, 1796, by the Marquis of Lansdorun,

(84)

Resolutions model in the House of Comm6145, on the roth of May, 1796, by

Mir For, for an iddress to his Maje,ły, on the Conduct of Administration,

in the commencemnt and Progress of the War,

(85)

His Maielly's speech to bothe Houses of i'arliament, May 19, 1796, (89)

His Maje, y's Speech to both Houses of Parliament, bei 6, 1796, (90)

Audress of the House of Commons to the King, moved by Lord Mcrpeth, (92)

Address of the House of Lords, moved by Earl Bathurji,

(93)

Amendment to the above Address, moved by Earl Fitzwilliam, and nezatived

without a Division,

(95)

Protest of Earl Fitzwilliam ag inst the Addrijfs of the House of Lords to the

Throne, on his Majeliy's Speech, announcing the opening of a Negotiation
for Peace with the French Re, ublic,

(ibid.)
Proceedings in the House of Commons, Dec. 14, 1796, respecting a Vote of

Cenfure on Administration, for issuing certain sums of Money without the

Consent of Parliament,

(99)

His deefly's Meage to the House of Commons, Dec. 17, 1796, (ibid.)

Procetdings in the House of Commons, Dec. 29, 1796, on the Subje&t of the

preceding 11eflage,

(100)

His Majesty's Medise to the House of Peers, presented Dec. 26, 1796, (ibid.)

Proceedings of the House of Peers on his Majesty's Melage, (101)

Proceed ng's in the Houp of Commons, Dec. 30, 1796, on a fimilar Meffage

delivered on the same Day with the preceding,

(103)

Speech of his Excellency tle Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, to both Houses of

Parliament, Jan. 21, 1796,

(104)

Speech of the S; eaker of the Brijin House of Comn:ens, on presenting the Bills of

Supply to his Excellency the Lord Lieutenant, for the Royal Allent, (106)

Speech of the Lord Lieutenant of Ire:and, to buih Houses of Parliament, April
15, 1796,

(ibid.)

Speech of the Lord Lieuter:ant of Ireland, to bo.h Ileusis of Parliament, 08.

13, 1796,

(108)

Maniffo aynin e Great Britain, by the National Ayembly representing the

batavian Vation, 1:2, 1796,

(110)

Manifejeo of the Court of Spain ag airfi Great Britain, Och 5, 1796, (115)

od ,

Anficer of the British Govirnment to ihe S; anila Declaration of t’ari (117)

Note tranfm.itcé to 11. Barthelemy, Ambassador from the French Republic 19

the Helvetic Body, by Ir. Vicklam, his Britannic Majesty's Minifier Pleni-

potentiary to the Swifs Cantons, March 8, 1796,

(123)

Note transmitted to Wr. Wickham by M. Larthelemy, March 26, 1796,

(124)

Note, published by the Court of London, as a Comment on the above Correspon-

dinci,

(125)

Official Correspondence, published by the British Government, relative to the

Negotiation for Piace between the French Republicard Great Britain, (126)

Mlanifisto of the Britijs Government against France,

(149)

Declaration of the !!ig Club, met to affociate for the Repeal of the Treason

and Silition Pills,

(153)

Addrefs of the City of London to his Majesty on the safe Delivery of the

Prince's of Wales, ar../ the Birth of a trince's,

(158)

Aldrefs of the City of London to her Majesty on the same Occasion, (159)

Copy

Copy of a Circular Letter from the Duke of Portland to the Lieu!cnants of

Counties on the Sea Coal, dated 1 bitehall, Novembir 5, 1796, (159)

A Proclamation of his Excellency the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland against illegal

and treafonable Afocia'ions,

(160)

A Proclamation by the Lord Lieutenant and Council of Ireland, deciaring

certain Parts of the County of Dozon in a State of Difturi ance, (161)

Treaty of Peace, concluded between the French Republic and th: King of Sar.

dinia, May 15, 1796,

(162)

Treaty of Peace concluded betrueen the French Republic and the King of

the Two Sicilies, Oct. 10, 1796,

(165)

Treaty of Alliance offensive and defenfive between the French Republic

and the King of Spain, dur. 19, 1796,

(167)

Treaty between the King of Prusia and the French Republic, respelling

the Neutrality of the North of Germany, Aug. 5, 1796,

(170)

Anfever of the President of the United States of America, to the Resolution

passed by the House of Representatives, on the 29th of March 1796, which

had for its Object to procure a Copy of the Injtructions granted 10 MIr. Fay

relative to the Treaty with Great Britain,

(171)

Resolutions passed by <he House of Representatives of the United States, on the

Address of George Washington, President, to the Citizens of the United States,

on his intended Rehgnation,

(17)

Note presented to the American Secretary of Stale, by Citizen Adit, Minifter

Plenipotentiary from the French Republic, 08. 17, 1796, (186)

Extract from the Regifer of Refoiutions of the Executive Directory of the

141h Melilor, 1th Fear of the French Republic, 0c and indicesibl, (189)

Answer of the Executive Government of America to Citizen licht's Note, ii-

closing the Decree of the Directory respecting Acairal lefels, (18)

A Proclamation by George Wajbing tvil, President of the United States of Amer

rica,

1191)

Speech of Getrge Walvington, President of the United States of America, to

both Houses of Congres, beer mber 7, 1796,

(193)

Address of the scrate, presented by their President, John Adams, to the Presi-

dent of the United States, in Answer to the above Sprech, Decemler 12,
1996,

(197)

The Prident's Reply,

(199)

BIOGRAPHICAL ANECDOTES AND CHARACTERS.

Character of Cofino de' Medici,

[?]

Review of the Character of Lorenzo de' Medici,

(5]

Mlemoirs of the Abate Metafialio,

(9]

Life and Character of Anthony Raphael Mengs,

217

Portrait of the Marquis Azo the Second,

[ 2]

Particulars of the earlier Years of Mr. Gibbon,

13:11

MANNERS OF NATIONS.

Manners of the Inhabitants of Param rribo,

(59)

Defcrip.ion of the Perpins, c. of the Northern Indians,

1031

Genuine Account of the Nimiquas,

[73]

Picture of the Houzouanas,

[no]

a 4

CLASSICAL

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Τ Η Ε

Η Ι S Τ Ο R Y

OF

KNOWLEDGE, LEARNING,

AND TASTE,

IN GREAT BRITAIN,

During the Commonwealth and the Usurpation of CROMWELL.

T has frequently been remarked, that, in periods of energies of the human mind are often called forth to action; and if we have to witness much calamity, vice, and horror, the prospect is fomewhat cheered by examples of virtue uncontaminated by interest, and of genius unfettered by timidity. Yet the short space of time which elapsed from the deposition of the first Charles to the accession of his son, presents us with not many names of eminence in literature, which were unnoticed in the preceding period. There was certainly a large mass of learning deposited at this time in various hands; but that learning was obscured by pedantry; and the science, as well as the morals of the age, was perverted by fanati cism. It was an age of projects, but those projects partook of all the wildness of anarchy; and history and politics were debased, as they too commonly are, by a devo. tion to party

The

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