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APPENDIX V.-POSTAL SERVICE

MEXICAN POSTAL TARIFF

FIRST CLASS (Letters and all sealed matter)--For each 20 grams or fraction: Urban delivery, 5 centavos. Mexico, Spain, or any country of the American Continent, 10 centavos. Other countries of the Postal Union, 20 centavos. Postcards: Urban delivery, 2 centavos; Mexico, Spain, and all countries of the American Continent, 4 centavos; other countries of the Postal Union, 12 centavos.

SECOND CLASS (Group I-Periodicals and registered publications of a current nature. Group II-Certain publications of minor importance, which contain novels and other literary works printed on the installment plan.) Group I— For each 500 grams or fraction: Urban delivery, Mexico, Spain, and any country of the American Continent, 3 centavos. Group II-Double the rate specified for Group I.

THIRD CLASS (Books, catalogues, and printed matter in general not mailed by publishers.) For each 100 grams or fraction: Urban delivery, Mexico, Spain, and all countries on the American Continent, 2 centavos.

FOURTH CLASS (Samples without value.) -For each 100 grams or fraction (limit weight 30 grams): Urban, Mexico, Spain and countries on the American Continent, 2 centavos.

THIRD AND FOURTH CLASSES (Mixed Matter)-For each 100 grams or fraction (limit 250 grams): Urban, Mexico, Spain and countries on the American continent, 2 centavos.

FIFTH CLASS (Parcel Post)-Limit for domestic offices reached by rail or water communication, 10 kilograms; for all other offices, 5 kilograms. The unit for all parcel post rates is 50 grams or fraction. The domestic rate is determined by zones, as follows: Urban and first zone (50 grams or fraction), 10 centavos; second zone, 15; third zone, 20; fourth zone, 25; United States or possessions, 25. (Limit weight 10 kilograms.)

REGISTRY FEE-For parcels in domestic postal service, 10 centavos. All other mail, 20 centavos.

MONEY ORDERS (Domestic or Foreign):

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SPECIAL DELIVERY: First, Third and Fourth Classes: 20 centavos each piece.

CIRCULAR LETTERS OF CREDIT: These are issued in amounts of from 100 to 2,000 pesos by all important postoffices and are payable in any postoffice of the country. The rate is one per cent of the value.

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Samples of Merchandise

2
1

For the first 4 ounces or less.

For each additional 2 ounces.

Registration fee, in addition to postage......10

Articles which are admitted to the domestic mails of the United States will be admitted under the same conditions to the mails for Mexico, except that printed matter, commercial papers, and bona fide trade samples are transmissible in the regular mails at the postage rate and subject to the conditions applicable to those articles in Mexican mails. Sealed packages other than letters in their usual and ordinary form are unmailable.

Packages of merchandise may be sent to Mexico at the postage rate of 1 cent for each ounce or fraction for packages not weighing more than 4 ounces, and at the rate of 12 cents for each pound or fraction for packages exceeding 4 ounces in weight up to 4 pounds 6 ounces. Parcels for Mexico must be accompanied with customs declarations regardless of their weight. Mailable merchandise may also be sent by foreign parcel post. (See below.) Packages of merchandise cannot be insured or sent C. O. D., but they may be registered. PARCEL POST REGULATIONS

Postage rate.
Limit weight..

.12 cents per lb. or fraction .22 lbs.

Maximum Dimensions..... Combined length and girth 72 in., max. length, 36 in. Customs Declaration required. Parcel cannot be insured but may be regisMaximum indemnity for parcels under 11 lbs. is approximately $4.80.

tered.

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APPENDIX VI

TREATIES BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND MEXICO1

1828.a

TREATY OF LIMITS.

Concluded January 12, 1828; ratification advised by the Senate April 4, 1832; ratified by the President April 5, 1832; ratifications exchanged April 5, 1832; proclaimed April 5, 1832.

I. Boundary.

II. Boundary line.

ARTICLES.

III. Commissioners.
IV. Ratification.

The limits of the United States of America with the bordering territories of Mexico having been fixed and designated by a solemn treaty, concluded and signed at Washington on the twenty-second day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and nineteen, between the respective Plenipotentiaries of the Government of the United States of America on the one part, and of that of Spain on the other; and whereas the said treaty having been sanctioned at a period when Mexico constituted a part of the Spanish monarchy, it is deemed necessary now to confirm the validity of the aforesaid treaty of limits, regarding it as still in force and binding between the United States of America and the United Mexican States:

With this intention, the President of the United States of America has appointed Joel Roberts Poinsett their Plenipotentiary, and the President of the United Mexican States their Excellencies Sebastian Camacho and José Ygnacio Esteva;

And the said Plenipotentiaries, having exchanged their full powers, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

The dividing limits of the respective bordering territories of the United States of America and of the United Mexican States being the same as were agreed and fixed upon by the above-mentioned treaty of Washington, concluded and signed on the twenty-second day of February, in the year one thousand eight hundred and nineteen, the two high contracting parties will proceed forthwith to carry into full effect the third and fourth articles of said treaty, which are herein recited, as follows:

ARTICLE II.

The boundary line between the two countries west of the Mississippi shall begin on the Gulf of Mexico, at the mouth of the river Sabine, in the sea, continuing north along the western bank of that river to the thirty-second degree of latitude; thence by a line due north to the degree of latitude where it strikes the Rio Roxo of Natchitoches, or Red River; then following the course of the Rio Roxo westward to the degree of longitude one hundred west from London and twenty-three from Washington; then crossing, the said Red River, and running thence by a line due north to the river Arkansas; thence, following the course of the southern bank of the Arkansas, to its source, in latitude forty-two north; and thence, by that parallel of latitude,

1 Reprinted from Malloy, Treaties and Conventions, I. 1082-1205.

aThe commission referred to in this treaty was never appointed. The accession of Texas and the war between the United States and Mexico rendered the treaty inoperative.

to the South Sea; the whole being as laid down in Melish's map of the United States, published at Philadelphia, improved to the first of January, one thousand eight hundred eighteen. But if the source of the Arkansas River shall be found to fall north or south of latitude forty-two, then the line shall run from the said source due south or north, as the case may be, till it meets the said parallel of latitude forty-two, and thence, along the said parallel, to the South Sea, all the islands in the Sabine, and the said Red and Arkansas Rivers, throughout the course thus described, to belong to the United States of America; but the use of the waters and the navigation of the Sabine to the sea, and of the said rivers Roxo and Arkansas, throughout the extent of the said boundary on their respective banks, shall be common to the respective inhabitants of both nations.

The two high contracting parties agree to cede and renounce all their rights, claims, and pretensions to the territories described by the said line; that is to say, the United States hereby cede to His Catholic Majesty, and renounce forever, all their rights, claims, and pretensions to the territories lying west and south of the above-described line; and, in like manner, His Catholic Majesty cedes to the said United States all his rights, claims, and pretensions to any territories east and north of the said line; and, for himself, his heirs, and successors, renounces all claim to the said territories forever.

ARTICLE III.

To fix this line with more precision and to place the landmarks which shall designate exactly the limits of both nations, each of the contracting parties shall appoint a commissioner and a surveyor, who shall meet before the termination of one year from the date of the ratification of this treaty, at Natchitoches, on the Red River, and proceed to run and mark the said line, from the mouth of the Sabine to the Red River, and from the Red River to the river Arkansas, and to ascertain the latitude of the source of the said river Arkansas, in conformity to what is above agreed upon and stipulated, and the line of latitude forty-two to the South Sea. They shall make out plans and keep journals of their proceedings; and the result agreed upon by them shall be considered as part of this treaty, and shall have the same force as if it were inserted therein. The two Governments will amicably agree respecting the necessary articles to be furnished to those persons, and also as to their respective escorts, should such be deemed necessary.

ARTICLE IV.

The present treaty shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington, within the term of four months, or sooner if possible.

In witness whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed the same and have hereunto affixed our respective seals.

Done at Mexico this twelfth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, in the fifty-second year of the Independence of the United States of America, and in the eighth of that of the United Mexican States.

[SEAL.]

[SEAL.] [SEAL.]

J. R. POINSETT.
S. CAMACHO.
J. Y. ESTEVA.

1831.a TREATY OF LIMITS.

Concluded April 5, 1831; ratification advised by the Senate April 4, 1832; ratified by the President April 5, 1832; ratifications exchanged April 5, 1832; proclaimed April 5, 1832.

The time having elapsed which was stipulated for the exchange of ratifications of the treaty of limits between the United States of America and the United Mexican States, signed in Mexico on the twelfth day of January, aThis extension treaty expired with the treaty of 1828.

one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, and both Republics being desirous that it should be carried into full and complete effect, with all due solemnity, the President of the United States of America has fully empow ered, on his part, Anthony Butler, a citizen thereof, and Chargé d'Affaires of the said States in Mexico; and the Vice-President of the United Mexican States, acting as President thereof, has, in like manner, fully empowered, on his part, their Excellencies Lucas Alaman, Secretary of State and Foreign Relations, and Rafael Mangino, Secretary of the Treasury;

Who, after having exchanged their mutual powers, found to be ample and in form, have agreed, and do hereby agree, on the following article:

The ratifications of the treaty of limits concluded on the twelfth of January, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, shall be exchanged at the city of Washington within the term of one year, counting from the date of this agreement, and sooner should it be possible.

The present additional article shall have the same force and effect as if it had been inserted, word for word, in the aforesaid treaty of the twelfth of January, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, and shall be approved and ratified in the manner prescribed by the Constitutions of the respective States.

In faith of which the said Plenipotentiaries have hereunto set their hands and affixed their respective seals. Done in Mexico, the fifth of April of the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one, the fifty-fifth of the independence of the United States of America, and the eleventh of that of the United Mexican States.

[SEAL.]

[SEAL.]

[SEAL.]

A. BUTLER.
LUCAS ALAMAN.
RAFAEL MANGINO.

1831.a

TREATY OF AMITY, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION.

Concluded April 5, 1831; ratification advised by the Senate March 23, 1832; ratified by the President April 5, 1832; ratifications exchanged April 5, 1832; proclaimed April 5, 1832.

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XIV. Protection to persons and property.

XV. Religious liberty.

XVI. Free ships; free goods.

XX. Contraband liable to confiscation. XXI. Notice of blockade.

XXII. Examination of vessels at sea.

XXIII. Sea letters.

XXIV. Vessels under convoy.

XXV. Prize courts.
XXVI. War.
XXVII. Ministers.

XXVIII. Consuls.

XXIX. Consuls.

XXX. Deserters.

XXXI. Consular convention.
XXXII. Interior commerce.
XXXIII. Indian hostilities.

XVII. Neutral flag over enemy's property. XXXIV. Duration; ratification.

The United States of America and the United Mexican States, desiring to establish upon a firm basis the relations of friendship that so happily subsist between the two Republics, have determined to fix in a clear and positive manner the rules which shall in future be religiously observed between both, by means of a treaty of amity, commerce and navigation. For which impor

"aThe operation of this treaty was suspended by war between the parties in 1846-47, but was revived with some exceptions by article 17 of the treaty of February 2, 1848. Article XXXIII was abrogated by the second article of the treaty of December 30, 1853, and the entire treaty was finally terminated November 30, 1881, by virtue of notice given by Mexico."-J. C. Bancroft Davis' Notes to Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 1234. Atocha v. U. S. (8 Ct. Cls., 427).

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