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“ They are worthy of reprehension who contemn the study of
antiquity, (which is ever accompanied with dignity) as an arid
curiosity.”

LORD CORE.

BROOKDYN:
PRINTED BY A, SPOONER, NO. 50 FULTON-STREET.

1824. 11

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ADVERTISEMENT.

The Compiler offers these notes to the inhabitants of his native town, in the hope that they may be in some small degree useful and entertaining in discussions relating to the history and rights of this thriving place. He claims no merit for this performance, and neither does he write from the vanity of being considered an author, but is only actuated by a desire to rescue from oblivion such facts as may be interesting to his fellow-citizens. The Compiler would consider himself guilty of ingratitude, if he did not in this public manner, acknowledge the obligations he rests under from the kind assistance afforded him whilst collecting these notices, by Jeremiah Johnson, Abraham Vanderveer, Silas Wood, and John Doughty, Esqrs.

71383, ILS 1995 28.8.5

NOTES &c.

OF THE

TOWN OF BROOKLYN.

SITUATION.

This town is situated in Kings County, on the west end of Long-Island, in the State of New York. It is bounded north by the City and County of New-York; east by the township of Bushwick; south by the township of Flatbush and New Utrecht; and west by New-York Bay; and contains the village of Brooklyn, which is about a mile square. This town formerly composed part of a powerful Indian Sachemdom; and with the other parts of the Island bore the Indian name of Matowcas.

This part of the Island, as far as Jamaica was inhabited by the Canarsee tribe of Indians. The old Dutch inbabitants in this county bave a tradition, that the Canarsee Indians were subject to the Mohawks, as all the Iroquois were called, and paid them an annual tribute of dried clams and wampum. When the Dutch settled here, they persuaded the Canarsees to keep back the tribute; in consequence of which a party of the Mohawks came down and killed their tributaries wherever they met them. So great was the dread that these Indians afterwards entertained of the Iroquois, that when a party of the Iroquois, during the French war were taken prisoners and imprisoned in the Jail of this county, the Canarsees avoided them with the greatest care; and seemed to be afraid even to come where they should

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