Gambar halaman
PDF
ePub

A

L.A.W DICTION A R Y,

ADAPTED TO THE

CONSTITUTION AND LAWS
*

OF THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

And of The

S EVERAL STATES OF THE AMERICAN UNION;

witH

REFERENCES
THE CIVIL AND OTHER SYSTEMS

of

For EIGN LA w.

By JOHN BOUVIER.

IN TWO WOLUMES.—WOL. II.

PHILADELPHIA :

T. & J. W. J O HNSON, LAW BOOKS E L L E RS,
SUCCESSORS TO NICKLIN & JOHNSON,
No. 5 MINOR STREET. --

1839.

Entered according to the act of Congress, in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, By John Bouvier, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

LABEL. A narrow slip of paper or parchment, affixed to a deed or writing hanging at or out of the same. This name is also given to an appending seal.

LACHES. This word, derived from the French lacher, is nearly synonymous with negligence. In general, when a party has been guilty of laches in enforcing his right by great delay and lapse of time, this circumstance will at common law prejudice, and sometimes operate in bar of a remedy which it is discretionary and not compulsory in the court to afford. In courts of equity also delay will generally prejudice; 1 Chit. Pr. 786, and the cases there cited; 8 Com. Dig. 684; 6 Johns. Ch. R. 360. But laches may be excused from ignorance of the party's rights. 2 Mer. R. 362; 2 Ball & Beat. 104; from the obscurity of the transaction, 2 Sch. & Lef. 487; by the pendency of a suit, 1 Sch. & Lef. 413; and where the party labours under a legal disability, as, insanity, coverture, infancy, and the like. And no laches can be imputed to the public. 4 Mass. R. 522; 3 Serg. & Rawle, 291; 4 Henn. & Munf. 57; 1 Penna. R. 476. Wide 1 Supp. to

Wes. Jr. 436; 2 Ib. 170; Dane's Ab. Index, h. t. LAGA. The law; Magna Charta; hence Saxon-lage, Mercen-lage, Dane-lage, &c. LAGAN. Wide Ligan. LAMB. A ram, sheep or ewe under the age of one year. 4 Car. & P. 216 ; S. C. 19 Eng. Com. Law Rep. 351. LAND. This term comprehends any ground, soil or earth whatsoever, as meadows, pastures, woods, waters, marshes, furze and heath. It has an indefinite extent upwards as well as downwards; therefore land, legally includes all houses and other buildings standing or built on it; and downwards, whatever is in a direct line between the surface and the centre of the earth, such as mines of metals and fossils. 1 Inst. 4 as Wood's Inst. 120; 2 Bl. Com. 18; 1 Cruise on Real Prop. 58. In a more confined sense the word land is said to denote “frank tenement at the least.” Shepp. Touch. 92. In this sense, then, leaseholds cannot be said to be included under the word lands, 3 Madd. Rep. 535. The technical sense of the word land is further explained by Sheppard, in his Touch. p. 88, thus:

« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »