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Dauphiné form a majestic back-ground, and close the scene. Mr Whalley speaks with delight of their little green drawing-room, whose windows are curtained with foliage from a small grove of planes, elms, and flowering limes. Between the irregular trunks of the trees, and beneath their branches, are seen the pure waters of the Sorgue. They are perfectly azure, and flow an hundred yards distant from this romantic habitation. Think, dear Miss Williams, how the consciousness of this river's poetic consecration, by Pe. trarch, must enhance the delight with which the kindred spirit of Mr Whalley gazed on its waves, as they wandered by this villa. He tells me, that, to complete the magic of the scene, their near grove was the mansion of nightingales, which, when he wrote, were in full song

Many English families of rank, residing for a time at Avignon, followed our friend's example, and formed a sort of colony in the muse-hallowed scene ; pleased with the idea of passing a summer in the vicinity of that immortal fountain and valley, which had witnessed the beauty of Laura, and heard the songs of Petrarch,

6. That spread the fame of his disastrous love."

Adieu !

LETTER XIX.

To Mrs G

Lichfield, Aug. 27, 1785. Be assured, dear Madam, it was with no cold ear that I listened to Dr B

when he talked to me of the obligations which Lord H acknowledged to the valour and conduct of your gallant brother-in-law. Yet, had my spirit still more fervently hailed a theme so welcome, but for the consciousness, which your late letters have inspired, that this distinguished supporter of our naval glory was less sensible than he ought to be of your merit, and of those tender and constant attentions, with which your high-strung esteem impels you to honour him.

Will you, however, forgive me, if I observe, that, as his virtues are cast in a sterner mould than yours, the effusions of so poignant a sensibility may probably not only be incomprehensible, perhaps they are displeasing. Do they not seem a tacit reproof to his own colder temperament ? They may perhaps more induce him to question the sincerity of your regard, than to tell himself Dauphiné form a majestic back-ground, and close the scene. Mr Whalley speaks with delight of their little green drawing-room, whose windows are curtained with foliage from a small grove of planes, elms, and flowering limes. Between the irregular trunks of the trees, and beneath their branches, are seen the pure waters of the Sorgue. They are perfectly azure, and flow an hundred yards distant from this romantic habitation. Think, dear Miss Williams, how the consciousness of this river's poetic consecration, by Pe. trarch, must enhance the delight with which the kindred spirit of Mr Whalley gazed on its waves, as they wandered by this villa. He tells me, that, to complete the magic of the scene, their near grove was the mansion of nightingales, which, when he wrote, were in full song.

Many English families of rank, residing for a time at Avignon, followed our friend's example, and formed a sort of colony in the muse-hallowed scene ; pleased with the idea of passing a summer in the vicinity of that immortal fountain and valley, which had witnessed the beauty of Laura, and heard the songs of Petrarch,

6. That spread the fame of his disastrous love."

Adieu !

LETTER XIX.

To Mrs G

Lichfield, Aug. 27, 1785. Be assured, dear Madam, it was with no cold ear that I listened to Dr B- when he talked to me of the obligations which Lord H cknowledged to the valour and conduct of your gallant brother-in-law. Yet, had my spirit still more fervently, hailed a theme so welcome, but for the consciousness, which your late letters have inspired, that this distinguished supporter of our naval glory was less sensible than he ought to be of your merit, and of those tender and constant attentions, with which your high-strung esteem impels you to honour him.

Will you, however, forgive me, if I observe, that, as his virtues are cast in a sterner mould than yours, the effusions of so poignant a sensibility may probably not only be incomprehensible, perhaps they are displeasing. Do they not seem a tacit reproof to his own colder temperament ? They may perhaps more induce him to question the sincerity of your regard, than to tell himself

hint to me,

that he is ungrateful. Heroic spirits are often proud ones; and pride will not endure the weight of incessant obligation. Affection, we all know, is the only coin in which we can be allowed to repay our debts to that affection which is demonstrated for us.

Where native disposition brings on inevitable insolvency, how can the noble mind observe, without pain, the sum of those debts increasing by hourly accumulation ? Since you

that
your

brother seems rather oppressed than gratified by the generous extreme of so much apparent veneration, I could wish

you to avoid letting him perceive its fervours : that you would demonstrate only such a degree of it as he can hope to equal and return. We must rein in our enthusiasms towards those who are not themselves enthusiasts, lest the warm ingenuous heart defeat, by its excess, its dearest purposes.

I cannot doubt your having been infinitely amused by Mr Boswell's tour.

The general style is somewhat too careless, and its egotism is ridiculed; but surely to the cold-hearted and fastidious reader only, will it seem ridiculous. The slip-shod style is richly compensated by the palpable fidelity of the interesting anecdotes ; the egotism, by that good humoured ingenuousness with which it is given, and by its unsuspecting

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