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at Warsaw, 432; formal retreat | Bismarck (Prince Otto von), his ap-
therefrom, 433; subsequent re pearance described by Samarow,
serve on Polish affairs, ib.; debates cxxxvii. 425
on the Polish Convention, 434; - his friendly relations with
meeting at Gastein, 436: dissolves Rome before Sedan, cxxxix. 368;
the Prussian Diet, 437 ; his share his complaint against the French
in the Danish War, ib.; visit to bishops during the war, 369; his
Biarritz, 441; interview with M. letter to Count Frankenburg, ib.;
Rouher at Carlsbad, rib.; meracing origin of his campaign against the
language to Austria, 443; his Church of Rome, 370; his impru-
policy superseded by the Conven dent policy as represented by the
tion of Gastein, 444; overtures to Falk laws, 372; case of Dr. Woll-
Napoleon, 445; peremptory dis mann, ib.; his Bill against the
patch to Baron Werther in 1866, abuse of the pulpit, 373; inspec-
446; the Prussian Chambers tion of public schools, 374; his
closed, 447; his efforts to alienate expulsion of the Jesuits, ib.; his
the King from Austria, 448; secret system of State persecution, 381 ;
treaty with Italy, 449, 450; his his arrogant and dictatorial lan-
pretexts for the war with Austria, guage, 382
ib. -452 ; success of his stake, ib.; | Bison, the Bison urus, cxi. 180; ac-
his conduct in the Luxembourg 1 climatisation of, in England, ib.
question, 453; negotiations in Bissel, battle of (1815), defeat of
1866 with Benedetti, ib.; his the Wahabees at, cxxii. 510
foreign and internal policy con Black (Dr. Joseph, 1728-1799), bis
trasted, 456 ; hatred of real liberty, I daughter married to Adam Fergu-
ib. ; administrative incapacity, ib.; son, cxxv. 70; his successful treat-
his introduction of universal suf ment of Ferguson's paralysis, 76;
frage, ib.; compared with Napoleon, his life by Ferguson, 84; his dis-
ib.; his Socialist tendencies, 457; coveries of carbonic acid and latent
his obsolete system of statesman heat, ib.
ship, ib.; a first-rate diplomatist, Black Country, the, cxvii. 406; gen-
ib.; his personal qualities, ib., eral aspect of, 408; clanship among
458

mining families, 429; habits of the
Bismarck (Prince Otto von), his in miners, 432; their intemperance,

terview in 1870 with Jules Favre, 433; the pitgirls, 435; spiritual
cxxxii. 583

condition of the people, 439. See
---- his long-cherished policy of Coalmines, English

Prussian supremacy, cxxxiii. 8; Black Death, the (1348), cxxvi. 46,
his political foresight in 1866, 9; views of Messrs. Rogers and See-
question of his similar knowledge bohm on the mortality, 50; its en-
of France in 1870, ib.; his repudia demic character, 60; traditions in
tion of the Luxembourg treaty, Norway and Sweden respecting, 61
278; his effrontery and bad faith, note ; its effect on wages and prices,
ib. 281

ib. 62; on the tenancy of land, 63
- his evasive conduct to Den Blackfriars (London), early history
mark respecting the Treaty of of, cxxxi. 166
Prague, cxxxiv. 239-243; his re Black Sea, neutralisation of, by the
mark on Paris during the siege, Treaty of Paris, cxxxiii. 275, 276.
513

See Russian War

Black Sea, problem of the escape of | Blomfield (Bishop), bis Bill for

under-currents from, cxxxix. 465 submitting doctrinal questions to a
Blackstone (Sir William, 1723-1780), Clerical Court, cxxi. 158 note

his Oxford lectures on law, cxxxiv. Blondus (Flavius, d. 1463), his lite-
498

rary works, cxxxvi. 137
Blaeu (John), his map of Scotland Blood, the, recent researches on its
in 1755, cxii. 492

composition, cxxxvi. 216; its vital
Blair (Dr. IIugh, 1718-1800), Dr. properties, ib. 217; the serous
Carlyle's sketch of, cxiï. 172

liquid, ib. ; admixture of albumen,
Blakely (Captain), his evidence 218; the fibrinous principle, ib.;

against English naval ordnance, microscopic inspection of, 219;
cxix. 517

blood-corpuscles, ib.; stamp-marks
Blanc (Louis, b. 1813), his 'Ilistory of vital condition, 221 ; retardation

of the French Revolution,' cxviii. of its movement, 225; colourless
101 ; vicissitudes of his authorship, and coloured corpuscles, ib.;
102 ; his patient conduct in exile, enormous number of the latter,
ib.; his researches at the British 227; mixture of gas, ib.; and oil,
Museum, 103; unity of purpose in 228; its connexion with disease,
his work, 104; his spirit of ad ib. ; stagnation and derangement
vocacy, 106 ; horesty of his par of, 230; pus-corpuscles, 232;
tisanship, 109; instances of his symptoms of depraved condition,
credulity, ib.; his prejudices 231; vitality of disease-germs,
against Pitt, 110: on the Septem 235; consumption due to degrada-
ber Massacres, 112 ; mitigates their tion of the blood, 238. See Disease
atrocity, 117; discredits the mur Blood-stains on food, cxxv. 407
der of Marie Gredeler, 119; bis Bloomsbury (London), origin and
account of Louis XVI. on the early history of, cxxxi. 182 .
scaffold, 121; affirms the murder Blount (Charles), suppressed pam-
of Robespierre, 124; his theory of phlets of, cxxxiv. 188, 189
the Dauphin's escape, 129; as Blücher (Field Marshal, 1742-1819),
cribes the increased value of as dismissed by Frederick the Great,
signats to the Maximum, 133; cxxiv. 563; restored by his nephew,

his opinion of the Revolution, 135 ib.; his activity on detached ser-
Blant (M. Edmond le), his • Chris vice, 566

tian Inscriptions of Gaul,' cxx. Blundeville, the first systematic
225; his geographical method of English writer on horsemanship,
arrangement, 230, 231 ; rare e of cxx. 134; his account of the light
Greek in Gaulish epitaphs, 232; Irish horse, 135
his translation of the Greek epi Bluntschli (Jean Gaspard, b. 1808),
taph found at Autun, 238, 239; on on the trade of neutrals in
the proportion of Christian soldiers contraband, cxxxv. 562_574
at Rome, 239; on Runic epitaphs, Boccaccio (Giovanni, 1313-1375),
247

his praise of the sculptor Giotti,
Blenheim, battle of (1704), Swedish cxxii. 87, 88

criticism on, cxxxii. 523 note Bodmer (Jean Jacques, 1698-1783),
Blomfield (Charles James, Bishop of his classical studies, cxxv. 225;

London, 1786-1857), his letter to his 'Bremische Beiträge,' 226;
Archbishop Howley on Colonial editorship of early German works,
Bishoprics, cxviii, 555, 556

26.

Bohemia, failure of Frederick the

Great's first invasion of, cxxiv.
557; invasions of 1778 and 1866

compared, 559
Böhme (Jacob), his theory of pa-

rental influence on children's cha-

racter, cxxxii. 120
Boiardo (Mathieu Marie,Count about

1434-1494), his Orlando Inna-
morato,' cxl. 359; English imi-

tations of his style, 360
Boigne (Benoit de, 1750–1830), his

military services to the Mahrattas,
cxxxiv. 361-365; his closing

years in France, ib. 366
Bokhara, the King excommunicates

Shere Ali, cxxv. 22 ; his claims to
sovereignty over Kokand, 36; his
defiant conduct to Russia, 37; im-
prisons the Russian ambassadors,
38; Russian campaign of 1866, ib.
40; defeated by General Roman-

ovski, ib.
---- disputes with Affghanistan

in 1869, cxxxviii. 280
Boldetti (Marc Antoine, 1663–1749),
• his volume on Christian inscrip-

tions, cxx. 222; his MS. des-

troyed, ib.
Boleyn (Anne, 1507–1536), Hallam's

vindication of, cxix. 277, and note
- mischiefs of precontracts il-
lustrated by her marriage, cxxx.

258
Bolingbroke (Henry St. John,

Viscount, 1672–1751), his genius
compared with that of Macaulay,
cxiv. 280 ; defends the Partition

Treaty, 312
Bolingbroke (Lord), Life of, by

Macknight, cxviii. 404; his me-
teor-like career, ib.; his noble de-
scent, 405 ; date of his birth un-
certain, ib.; his early education,
406; the rival of Walpole at Eton,
ib. ; life at Oxford, 407 ; intimacy
with Dryden, ib.; his feeble at-
tempts at verse, ib.; visits the
Continent, 408 ; his marriage not |

bappy, ib.; his love of drink, ib.;
enters the House of Commons, ib.;
joins the Tory majority in their
measures against the Whigs, 409;
his supremacy in debate, ib. ; rich-
ness of his writings, 410; his pre-
cocious rise in Parliament, ib.; his

Spirit of Patriotism,' 411; made
Secretary of War, 412; relations
with Marlborough, ib. 413; retires
to Bucklesbury, 414; Secretary of
State, 415; Mrs. Delany's sketch
of, 416; Swift's high estimate of,
417; his letter to the Examiner,'
418; becomes leader in the Com-
mons after Harley's promotion,
419; originates his club, ib.;
glimpses of his domestic life in the

Journal to Stella,' ib.; his over-
bearing conduct to the Whigs,
421; persecutes the press, ib.;
anecdote at the representation of
Addison's Cato,' 422; created
Viscount, ib.; his jealousy of
Oxford, ib. ; his mission to Paris,
423; alleged liaison with Madame
de Tencin, ib.; supposed inter-
view with the Pretender, ib.; his
conduct after the Treaty of
Utrecht, 424; his complicity in the
plot to restore the Pretender ex-
amined by M. Grimblot, 427 (see
vol. lxii. 1); his prospect of the
premiership destroyed by the
death of Anne, ib. ; his conduct at
the coronation of George I., 428,
and note; dismissed from office,
ib.; his defiant attitude, 429; his
attainder, 430; reduced tɔ degra-
dation, 431; his Reflexions on
Exile,' ib.; his letter to Windham
in 1717, ib.; his second marriage,
432; anecdote of his jealousy, ib.;
pardoned by George I., ib. ; his re-
sidence at La Source, 433; Vol-
taire's admiration of him, ib. ;
mode of life at Dawley, ib.; nis
hatred of Walpole, ib.; Walpole's
fancy picture of him in the IIouse

of Commons, 434; his political
writings, 435; his "Idea of a
Patriot King,'ib.; Dr. Johnson's
stricture on his philosophical spec-
ulations, 436; his death, ib. ; his
claim to greatness examined, 437;
his reputation in debate, ib. ; his
mastery of rhetoric shown in his
writings, ib.; his rich and varied
imagery, ib.; moral of his career,
438
Bolingbroke (Lord), his sceptical

works published posthumously,
cxxxix. 95; Johnson's denuncia-

tion thereof, ib.
Bologna, its importance in the

Middle Ages, cxii. 114
Bologna (John of, Tuscan sculptor,

1521-1608), his statues and bas-

reliefs, cxxi. 552
Bolsena, the miracle of, cxxxvi. 279
Bonald (Louis Gabriel Ambroise,

Vicomte de, 1754-1840), his re-
mark on sacrilege, cxxiv. 344
Bonaparte. See Buonaparte
Boner (Charles), his . Transylvania,'

cxxiii.130; merits of his work, 131;
his reception by the peasantry,136;
fondness for the Saxons, ib. ; his
love of sport, 142; recommends

Transylvanian wine, 143
Bonstetten (Charles Victor de, 1746–

1832), Memoirs of, cxix. 413;
his contemporaries, 414; his pa-
trician descent, 415; his early
education, 416; his restless and
independent temper, ib. ; attempts
suicide, 417 ; his visit to England,
418; Gray's affection for him, ib.;
introduced to literary salons at
Paris, 420; his contrast of social
life in England and France, ib.;
his father's death, 421; appointed
Member of the Council at Berne,
423 ; his republican sympathies,
ib.; his reception by the Avoyer,
424 ; his life as bailli at Gessenay,
ib.; his · Letters from the Herd-
lands of Switzerland,' 425; re-

moved to Nyon, ib.; is the 'Aga-
thon' of the poet Matthison, 426 ;
his opinion of the French Revolu-
tion, ib.; transferred to the Italian
bailliages of the Ticino, 427; his
letters from Lugano, 428 ; aversion
to priestcraft, 429; visits Copen-
hagen, ib. ; determines to settle at
Geneva, 430; his friendship with
Madame de Staël, 431 ; his esti-
mate of her character, 433; his
description of Byron, 434; his
character compared with that of
Sismondi, 435; Sismondi's sketch
of him, 436; offers marriage to
Sismondi's mother, 437; progres-
siveness of his education, 438; his
numerous correspondents, 439; his
attachment to the Countess of
Albany, ib. ; his ‘Recollections'
written late in life, 4-10; his death,

441
Bontemps (M.), on the secret of an-

cient glass-painting, cxxv. 163;
his impartial estimate of Munich
artists, 169; revives the art of
making ruby, 175
Book-clubs, literary, in Great Britain,

cxxv. 232
Books, trade in, at Ancient Rome,

cxxiv. 355
- study of, by great scholars,
misunderstood, cxxxi. 197

- suppressed and censured,
cxxxiv. 161; fate of Protagoras'
writings, 162; heathen destruction
of Christian books, ib.; English
devices for suppression of heresy,
ib.; State interference with W'y-
clif, ib.; English translations of the
Bible, 163, 167; Proclamation of
1530, 168; authors denounced in
1546, 169 ; Act of Edward VI., ib.;
proclamations of Queen Mary,
170; reign of Elizabeth, 171;
Martin Marprelate tracts, 176;
James I., 178; anti-prelacy pam-
phlets under Charles I., 181; the
Puritans, 186; the · Book of

Sports,' ib.; book-burning i after
the Restoration, 187; anonymous
pamphlet, the Memorial of the
Church of England, 189; other
writings under Anne, ib. 191 ; the
• North Briton,' 192; books burnt
by the Universities, 193; M.
Peignot's valuable history of, in
France, 194; want of a similar

work in England, ib.
Books, accessibility of, in modern

times, cxxxix. 1; ancient form of,
5; circulation of, before printing,
6; prices of, in ancient Rome, 7;
early éditions de luxe, 11 ; cost of,
in mediaval England, 12. See

Libraries
Boos (Martin), his career and re-

ligious doctrines, cxxxvii. 561, 563
Booth (Enoch), his improvements in

pottery-work, cxxvi. 213
Bopp (Franz, 1791-1867), on the di-

vision of root-formations, cxv. 89
Borbstaedt (Colonel), his excellent

History of the Franco-German

War, cxxxii. 581
Borck (M. de, 1650-1747), Prussian
ambassador at St. James, cxvi.

183; his recall demanded, ib.
Borneo, object of Brooke's visit to,

cxvi. 401 ; immigration of Chinese,
406 ; their insurrection, 407 ; poli-
tical importance of, 411; its natu-
ral resources, 413; its liability to

pirates, 414
Boromeo (M.), Italian physician,

his experiments on skin-grafting,

cxxxvi. 499
Bosc (M.), his edition of Madame

Roland's 'Appeal,' cxxi. 386
Bosio (Antonio, d. 1629), his explo-

rations of the Roman catacombs,
cxx. 218; his labours in decipher-
ing Christian inscriptions, 222;
on the Jewish catacomb at Rome,

243
Bosk, boskage, the terms explained,

cxxviii. 77
Bostaquet (Isaac Dumont de, 1632-1

1709), his Autobiography, cxxi.
493 ; his Huguenot ancestors, 495;
early education, ib. ; first campaign
in France, 496; his family life in
Normandy, 498; persecutions at
home, 505; submits to recanta-
tion, 506 ; his flight io the Hague,
508; he abjures Catholicism,
509; serves under William of
Orange, 511 ; his narrative of the
English expedition, ib.; resides at
Greenwich, 513; serves under
Schomberg in Ireland, 514; on
the victory of the Boyne, 515;
his sketches of Ireland, 516; on
the siege of Limerick, 517; retires
to Portarlington, 518; career of

his sons, 519
Boswell (James, 1740-1795), on

Mrs. Thrale's quarrel with Dr.
*Johnson, cxiii. 510
- - his remark on family histo-

ries, cxxxviii. 1
Bosworth-field, battle of (1485), plan

of, cxv. 316; Shakspeare's ac-

count of, 317
Botany, the science compared with

that of language, cxv. 74
Botfield (Beriah), his 'Prefaces to

the first editions of the Classics,
cxxxvii. 57 ; misquotation in his
introduction, 93; mistakes the

value of 'first editions,' ib.
Bothwell (Earl of), his character

by Mr. Burton, cxxvi. 261; por-
trait from his mummy, ib. note;

his fidelity to the Queen, 262
Botticelli (Sandro, 1437–1515), his

• Madonnas,' cxxii. 100
Bottle, the word in Shakspeare,

cxxviii. 65
Bouflers (Louis Francis de, Marshal

of France, 1644–1711), his gallant
defence of Lille against Eugene,
cxvi. 526; his conduct at Malpla-

quet, 534
Bourbon, House of, property of the

Prince's confiscated by Buona-
parte, cxiv. 490

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