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It arose in the determination to keep the negro substantially where he had been, in subjection to the “superior race," the “master-race," and on this issue a conflict was inevitable. Like the first acts of secession, the first doings of the Klan were viewed at the North with indifference, or laughed at as a play upon the fears of the ignorant freedmen. The Klan took its origin under the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which President Johnson made a primary condition of reconstruction, and gained its full vigor under the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. The President's plan would have rendered the work of the Klan easy. That of Congress made it difficult. President Johnson said that the plan of Congress had utterly failed in its purpose, which was, to a great extent, true. The governments finally fell into the hands of the rebels instead of the loyal people of the South. Nobody has ever denied that his policy would not have had the same end. It is vain now to speculate on other plans which might have been adopted. That any other would have proved preferable to the one that was adopted may be a matter of doubt.

The Rebellion was, at least, successful in the battle-field and in the evil work of the Ku-Klux Klan in destroying slavery, the thing it attempted to make respectable and eternal; in destroying the sophistry of secession ; and, to some extent, killing the fatal and extreme phases of the dogma of “State Rights.” The conflict between Northern and Southern civilization, after twenty years, still goes on.

But the

final result is not doubtful. Time and necessity are slowly and peacefully doing the work. A citizen of the South, of Northern extraction, has long ceased to be a “Carpet-bagger,” and in a generation or two the sun will shine on one civilization in America, in a strong, united, homogeneous Republic of States.

INDEX

B В

some

plan of reconstruction, 332—its
BRECKINRIDGE, John C.-called in Freedmen's Bureau measure,

to negotiate with General Sher- 336, 346—its famous Civil Rights
man, advised to quit the coun- Act presented to the President,
try, 250.

346, 362-overthrows the Presi-
Buell, General D. C.-abandons dent, its acts, 363, 364–assem-

the southern part of Tennes- bles in December, 1866, 366–
see, removed from command, tries the President, 482 to 526–
168.

passes

a bill providing for
Butler, General Benj. F.-reports general suffrage in the Dis-

resolutions, 412 — his trict, 385, 388-provides for the
course in the impeachment trial admission of Nebraska, 388–
of the President, 511, 517, 519, passes reconstruction measures,
520.

389, 390, 401-its Civil Tenure
с

Act, 406, 409--its other acts,
CABINET -- of Mr. Lincoln notifies 410--assembles March 4, 1867,

the Vice-President of the death 420-assembles in December of
of the President, 222-members that year, 420-orders the Four-

of President Johnson's, 224, 491. teenth Amendment to be de-
“Confederacy, Southern not clared a part of the Constitu-

recognized by General Sher- tion, 452—other acts, 452, 4534
man, 249—its last acts, its final counts the electoral votes in
collapse, 257-character of its 1869, 544-assembles in Decem-
legislature, 269, 270, 271-ig- ber, 1868, 545—its acts in this
nores its foundation principles, session, 573, 574—its reconstruc-
270— its currency and credit, tion policy, was it best ? 574,
271-its military exhibit, 272, 575, 576, 577, 579, 580, 581, 582,
273.

583, 621, 623—the limit of its
Congress — counts the electoral power over the States, 577, 578,

votes in 1864, 211, 212-enacts 579.
the Thirteenth Amendment to Constitution - 13th amendment
the Constitution, 300-- assem- to, enacted, 300—14th amend-
bles in December, 1865, 302-an ment to, 452-text of, as it now
effort made in, to uphold the stands, 462-order of time in
President's policy of reconstruc- which the thirteen original
tion, 330—its committee on re- States signed, 479.
construction reports against the Convention, Presidential - Re-
President, 331-its work and publican, in 1864, 192, 193, 194—

40-R

625

Democratic, in 1864, 204, 205— 251—Mr. Johnson's proclama-
Democratic, in 1868, 528 to tions declaring the warat an end,
53+ Republican, in 1868, 535, 258, 262—his proclamation re-
536, 537.

storing North Carolina, 277–
D

President Johnson's first an-
Davis, JEFFERSON—dictates John- nual message, 303–- President

ston's cunning letter, 251-still Johnson's message vetoing the
wants to fight, 254-mentions Freedmen's Bureau Act, 336-
the last engagement of the war the Civil Rights Bill, 346—Mr.
as proof of the justness of his Johnson's message vetoing this
cause, 257--his will becomes bill, 351-Mr. Johnson's second
absolute, 270—opens a bank at annual message, 366— general
Charlotte, 271–his ability and suffrage act for the District of
character, his last acts as head Columbia, 385-reconstruction
of the Rebellion, 271, 274, 275, acts, 389, 390, 401-Mr. John-
276—his arrest and imprison- son's message vetoing the re-
ment, 276-opinions favorable construction plans of Congress,
to his execution, 298—released 395—Civil Tenure Act, 106-
from prison, 454.

President Johnson's third an-
Declaration of Independence nual message, 421— Mr. John-

names of the signers of, 480. son's pardon and amnesty proc-
Democrats-take the side of the lamations, 455, 458, 60- the

President in the work of recon- Constitution of the United
struction, 330, 389, 410, 417, States, 462—Mr. Johnson's last
573-again organize their party, annual message, 545-Mr. John-
reverse their former theory, son's farewell address, 586.
417--their party utterly unable Dogma of State Rights-its com-
to save the Union in a rebell- plete and final overthrow, 270,
ion, 516.

417.
Documents and messages, Mr.

E
Johnson's Appeal to Tennessee, ELECTION, PRESIDENTIAL-in 1861,
148— Governor Johnson's ex- 211-the votes in, counted, 211,
traordinary proclamation and 212, 213—in 1868, 544, 515.
iron-clad oath, 170 to 174-let- “Enquirer,” Cincinnati de-
ter of the Cabinet notifying An- scribes the Democratic conven-
drew Johnson of the death of tion of 1864, 204, 205—describes
the President, 222— President the conventions of 1868, 528 to
Johnson's address on taking the 537.
oath of office, 223—President Ewing, Andrew - candidate for
Johnson's humiliation procla. Governor of Tennessee, 58—
mation, 238—his military and gives way for Andrew Johnson,
commercial orders, 239, 240, 241, 59.
242—amnesty proclamation of

G
May 29, 1865, 244—the Sherman GRANT, GENERAL-sanctions the
and Johnston memorandum, President's reconstruction at

the outset, 331, 576—changes

his view, 576.
Greeley, Horace-- goes on the

bond of Jefferson Davis, 454.

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H
“HERALD," New York—quota-

tion from, describing Governor
Johnson's dealings with the
rebel clergy, 155, 156, 157, 158,
159—quotation from, 160, 161,

162, 163, 165, 166.
House, White--President John-

son takes possession of, 600—
affairs in, under the Johnsons,
601, 602, 603, 604.

J

JOHNSON, JACOB-father of Presi-

dent Johnson, his life and char-

acter, 14, 15, 16, 17.
Johnson, President-his parents,

14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20—his birth,
17—his education, 18, 31, 32, 37,
38—his early pursuits, 18, 19,
20 — learns the tailor's trade,
seeks his fortunes in Tennessee,
manner of his appearance in his
new field, 19, 20, 30-a more or
less fabulous story of him, 20 to
29—the journeyman-tailor set-
tles permanently at Greenville,
30 — his marriage, 31-his wife
becomes his teacher, 31, 32
specimens of his letters and
improvement, 32, 35—his char-
acter and habits, 39, 40, 41, 42,
43, 47, 56, 74, 75, 89, 90, 93, 147,
190, 191, 217, 221, 365, 483, 485,
487, 572, 573, 581, 582, 608, 609,
614, 615, 616, 617, 618, 619, 620,
621-lays the foundation of a
fortune on the tailor's bench,
39 — his last job of tailoring,
40 — his first political position,

41-his early and late political
principles, 42, 46, 73, 74, 75, 86,
87, 89, 93, 94, 95, 148, 226, 227,
231, 234, 575, 579, 581, 582, 615,
616, 617, 620, 621, 623 -- places
himself among the people and
styles himself one of them, 42,
75, 608, 617-elected to the Leg-
islature, 34-a Van Buren elec-
tor in 1840, 45-—his qualities as
a speaker, 45, 618, 619, 620,
621-his position on slavery, 46,
50, 52, 53, 86, 93, 178, 179, 181,
184, 188, 336, 579, 581, 582,
616-elected to the State Senate,
to Congress, 46—his course and
speeches in the Lower House
of Congress, 50, 53, 56, 66, 71–
his personal bravery, 56, 57-
nominated for Governor of Ten-
nessee, 58, 59 elected, 60–
again elected to the same office,
his services as Governor, 61, 62,
63, 64- elected to the United
States Senate, visits President-
elect Buchanan, 65-breaking
of his arm, 66—his course and
speeches in the Senate, 66 to
91-his patriotism, 85, 86, 148,
615—his course in 1860, supports
Breckinridge, 85, 89, 90 — his
opinion of J. C. Calhoun, 87–
supported for the Presidency in
the Charleston Convention, 88–
his view of Joseph Lane, 90-
his great speech on the war
for the Union, 95 to 146 — ap-
pointed Military Governor of
Tennessee, 147 arrives in
Nashville, makes an appeal to
the people, 148, 152- his course
as Military Governor, 148, 152,
153, 154, 155, 159, 160, 167, 168,
169, 170 174, 175, 176, 177, 178,
179, 180, 190, 191 -- his course

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