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Commercial Revulsions, what kind of, lie in the sphere of the economist,

and what causes produce, 70%operation of these causes exemplified,
72—what would diminish the frequency of, 75—connection of the
currency with, 79—impropriety of the clamour raised against the
theory of the Economists, because they did not predict the late revul-
sion, 81_improvements of Government on the currency insufficient

to prevent, 91.'
Comte de Struensee, account of his elevation under Christian VII., 366

-fluctuating character of, 368—instances of his impolitic adminis-
tration, 369—what caused the conspiracy to subvert his administra-
tion, 370— execution of, 372_answer made by his counsel to the

charges preferred against him, ib.
Continental markets, from which of, the greatest quantity of grain could

be imported, 327.
Corn, computation of the annual consumption of, and by whom, 320

-estimate of the total consumption of, in the United Kingdom, 323.
Corn Laws, what quantity of foreign grain would be introduced upon

the repeal of the, and what proportion it would bear to our annual
consumption, 325-proofs drawn from the experience of former years,
when the ports were open, 326_whether prices would be depressed
according to the rate supposed, by the repeal of the, 327-price at
which corn might be imported from Dantzic, upon the abolition of
the, 328-estimate of the average price at which corn might be sold,
upon the repeal of the, 334—how landlords and farmers would be
affected by their repeal, 335-pernicious fluctuations in prices that
must occur until their repeal, 336—estimate of the pecuniary sum
that would be saved by their abolition, 341—various advantages that

would result from the repeal of, 345.
Court of France, condition of the, under Louis XIV, 416—by whom

its profligacy was unfolded, ib. by whom its transactions were re-
gulated, 421.

Danish monarchy, formerly elective, 360—when and how rendered

hereditary, 363—despotism introduced into the, 364—consequences

of its introduction, 365.
Danish Revolution, when brought about, and by whom, 371.
Dantzic, estimate of the price at which corn might be imported from,

to London, 328—cause of the depressed price of corn in, 329.
Denham, Major, travels and discoveries in Northern and Central Africa,

character of the narrative of, by, 174-how and where an opening
was furnished, which enabled him to explore the interior of Africa,
175—who was assigned as the guide of, to Bornou, 176-account of
Boo-Khaloom, the guide of, 177—appalling spectacle witnessed by,
and where, 178_description of the lake Tchad, by, 180—reception
of, at Bornou, 182—retreat of, from Dirkullah, and imminent ha-
zard encountered by, 192— participation in the expedition against the
Mungars, and objects observed by, in it, 195—account of the Log-
gunese, visited by, 197—character of the Shoua Arabs by, 199. ..

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Denmark, literary and political character of, 383.
Dirkullah, attack upon the Felatah town of, 191.
Discussions, Parliamentary, when first published in detail, 459_vast

influence they exert over the public opinion, 460-advantages attend-

ing the publicity of, 465.
Duke of Anjou, privy to the whole plot of the massacre of St Bartholo-

mew, 153.
Duc de Broglio, extract from the discourse of, 157.
Duc de St Simon, Memoirs of, light thrown on the reign of Louis
· XIV, by, 416.

Edwards, Dr, abuses occasioned by the system of licensing alehouses

pointed out by, 449extracts from his Letters, 450.
England, Church of, Letters on the, and by whom, 490_what conse-

quences would ensue, were its alliance with the State dissolved, 491
i-argument for the alliance of, with the State, refuted, and by whom,

495-evils and abuses of the, 502.
Emancipation of the Irish Catholics, advantages that would result from

the, 472.
Episcopalian, letters on the Church by an, 490—their merits, 491.
Erskine, Lord, inestimable services of, to his country, 399.

Falkenskiold, General, account of, and character of his Memoirs, 360

his sufferings and confinement, 377.
Farmers, benefits that would redound to,, upon the abolition of the
· Corn Laws, 335.
Felatah town of Dirkullah, attack upon, and by whom, 191-capital
' of the Felatahs, 202.
Form, whether the power of perceiving, implies a distinct and peculiar

faculty, 288.
France, Court of, condition of the, under Louis XIV, 416—by whom its

profligacy was unfolded, ib.—by whom its transactions were then re-
gulated, 421_favourable circumstances in the present political con-
dition of, 157–unpromising circumstances in its present political
situation, 159—hostility of the fanaticism prevalent in, to the ad-
vancement of free principles in, 160—undue influence possessed by
the monarch, adverse to the advancement of free principles.

Gall, Dr, opinion of, regarding a faculty supposed to be situated in a
· certain part of the brain, 274.
Gauden, Dr, short account of, 9-claims of, to be considered the author

of Icon Basilike, 10-letters of, to Lord Clarendon, furnishing strong
presumptive evidence of his being the author of Icon Basilike, 12-
proofs of Lord Clarendon's acquiescence in the claim of, to be its
author, 16-demonstration of the continued belief of Lord Clarendon
that he was the author of it, 19-silence of Lord Clarendon on the
subject, a proof that he believed him to be the author of it, 21-who
were privy to his composition of it, 30.

Gibson, Mr, account by, of the exports of wheat from Riga and Dante

zic, 324.
Great Britain, how much the population of, has increased since 1800,

322.

Hamburgh, average price of corn in, 332.
Hamilton, Mr, his system for teaching languages, 49-principles of his

system exemplified, 50-- its advantages, 51-fault in the mode of exe.
cuting it, 55-objections to the system of, refuted, 57— arguments
against the system, from the celerity with which languages are learn-

ed by it, obviated, 60-instances of success attending the system, 64.
History, Parliamentary and Review, plan of the publication entitled, 466

- merits of the work, 467-able extracts from it, 470—instances of
misrepresentation in, 479.
Hope, the sentiment of, whence arises, and whether a distinct faculty, 282.
Huskisson, Mr, his great exertions to improve our commercial policy,

359.

Icon Basilike, claims of Dr Gauden to be the author of, 10-letters of

Dr Gauden to Lord Clarendon, furnishing strong presumptive evi-
dence of his being the author of, 12-proofs of Lord Clarendon's ac-
quiescence in the claim of Dr Gauden to be the author of, 16-de-
monstration of the continued belief of Lord Clarendon that Dr Gauden
was the author of, 19-silence of Lord Clarendon on the subject, a
proof that he believed Dr Gauden to be the author of, 21— refutation
of some arguments designed to show that Charles I. was the author

of the, 26—who were privy to Dr Gauden's composition of the, 30.
Ireland, amount of its population, 321—what number of the population

of, subsist on corn, 322-how many quarters of grain are annually

consumed in, ib.
Irish Catholics, advantages that would result from the emancipation of

the, 472.
Iron Mask, man with the, who is proved to have been the, 3.
Jacob, Mr, account by, of the annual exports of wheat and rye from

Dantzic for twenty-five years, 324-mission of, for what purpose, and

how executed, 325.
Joint-Stock Companies, utility of, 475.
Judges, dependent condition of, before the Revolution, 401-acts of

Kings William and George concerning, 403-circumstance still affect-
ing the independence of, 404–plan for preventing the translation of,

410.

Kano, town of, described, 201—population of, and the degree of re-

finement characterizing the inhabitants of, 201.
Kempis, Thomas a, who is generally allowed to have been the author of
the book entitled, and how long the controversy concerning it was

ted, 2.

Kinnaird, Lord, character of his Letter to the Peers of Scotland, 397-

refutation by, of some opinions of the Peers, 400.
Kouka, capital of Bornou, 181. .
Land-tax, on whom the, falls, 355.
Landlords, benefits that would accrue to, from the repeal of the Corn

Laws, 335.
Licensing alehouses, disadvantages of the practice of, from its encourag-

ing monopoly, 443,-instance of monopoly thus produced, 444-con-
nection of the practice of, with the morals of the people, 447-cor-

ruption introduced by the custom of, 449.
Lingard, Dr John, History of England by, 94-character of, as an his-

torian in relating the massacre of St Bartholomew, 95-proofs of in-
accuracy in the narration of it, 96-instances of carelessness in research,
99—what the cause of the massacre of St Bartholomew, according to
100_fallacy of this view, 101-refutation of the statement of, con-
cerning the number of those who perished in the massacre, 112-ex-

amples of misrepresentation in, 125.
Loggunese, character of the, 197.
Lombardy, description of, and by whom, 228.
Louis XIV, character of his reign, and by whom it was unmasked, 416

-by whom swayed in his administration, 421.

Madame de Maintenon, short account of, 418-how she ingratiated here

self with Louis XIV, 419_way in which her ascendant was exercised
over Louis XIV, and by whom described, 421-character of her cor-

respondence, 424-extracts from it, 425.
Maitland, Captain, account of, and the character of his narrative, 385

- conversation of, with Captain Savary, 386—answer of, to a letter
from Buonaparte, 388_testimony of, to the unexceptionable demean-
our of Buonaparte on board the Bellerophon, 389-passage of a let-

ter of, to Lord Keith, 390_his conduct to Napoleon, 394.
Major Denham, travels and discoveries in Northern and Central Africa,

character of its narrative of, by, 174-how and where an opening was
furnished which enabled him to explore the interior of Africa, 175-
who was assigned as the guide of, to Bornou, 176-account of Boo-
Khaloom the guide of, 177-appalling spectacle witnessed by, and
where, 178—description of the lake Tchad, by, 180-reception of, at
Bornou, 182—retreat of, from Dirkullah, and imminent hazard en-

countered by, 192.
Magistracy, advantages of an unpaid, 441.
Man with the Iron Mask, who is proved to have been the, 3.
Mandara, kingdom and mountains of, described, 189.
Marriage, remarks on the English Laws relating to, 496.
Massacre, of St Bartholomew, character of Dr John Lingard as an his-

torian in relating the, 95-proofs of his inaccuracy in the narration
of the, 96_instances of careleseness in reseach in depicting the, 99
what was the cause of the, according to Lingard, 100-fallaoy of this
view, 101_description of the delight received by Charles from the,
105—proofs of the general plan on which the, was perpetrated, 110—
refutation of the statement of Dr Lingard concerning the number of
those who perished in the, 115—when the, was concerted, 118-in-
stances of misrepresentation by Dr Lingard on the subject of the, 121

-description of the enormities of the, 125-attempts to palliate its

atrocities considered, 137.
Molesworth, Lord, picture of the state of Denmark, by, 364.
Monk, General, character of, 39.
Montbarey Prince de, character of, 434–short account of his life, 435.

Niger, name of, whence derived, by whom imposed, light thrown on the

problem concerning the, and by whom, 209—conjecture concerning

the termination of that Niger explored by Park, 211.
North of Europe, agricultural capabilities of the, 326.

Order, whether the sentiment of, be a distinct and original faculty of

the mind, 272.
Organ, term of, improperly used by the Phrenologists, 256.
Oudney, Dr, visit of, to the Felatahs, 200.
Oxford, University of, claim of the, to the public gratitude, 3%.

Papal Benediction, ceremony of the, decribed, 231.
Parliamentary discussions, when first published in detail, 459—vast ini:

fluence they exert over public opinion, 460—advantages attending the

publicity of, 465.
Parliamentary History and Review, plan of the publication entitled,

466—merits of the work, 467—able extracts from the, 470—instan-

ces of misrepresentation in, 479.
Peers of Scotland, disabilities attaching to, 398.
Phrenology, where the system of, prevails most, and why, 254-general

proposition of the system of, examined, 255—what positions must be
true if the theory be correct, 258_whether the assertions of the sup-
porters of, is true, that the mind knows not the existence of the organs
of sense, 259—conclusive objections against the system of, 261–
why the intellectual faculties need most material organs, 262— distri-
bution of faculties in the system of, compared with that of metaphysi.
cal writers, 264-how the excessive multiplication of faculties in the
system of, militates against its truth, 268-whether what is termed
Acquisitiveness in the system of, be a distinct and independent faculty,
271—shallowness and puerility of the theory of, shown by the absurd
reasonings of its founders, 274—preposterous reasonings concerning
the organ of Individuality by the abettors of, 278—contradictory and
self-refuting statements of the chief supporters of, 280—whether Hope
is properly termed a primitive faculty in the system of, 282—absur-
dity of appending to Hope an antagonist faculty, 283—whether colour
and form are perceived by distinct faculties, as is maintained in the
theory of, 288-mistake of ascribing the perception of size and weight

nct faculties, committed by the patrons of, 291-why no proofs

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