Economic Development of the United States

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Appleton, 1921 - 691 halaman
 

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State and Local Governments
19
Private Institutions
20
Resources
21
The Soil and Climate
22
Forest Resources
24
Mineral Resources
26
Iron
27
Coal
28
Lead and Zinc
29
Water Resources
30
502
31
Other Resources
32
CHAPTER
37
190
46
COLONIAL INDUSTRIES
57
Negro Slavery
80
COLONIAL REGULATIONS
90
e
98
FORMATION OF THE CONSTITUTION AND THE IMMEDIATE
105
564
126
GROWTH OF POPULATION EXTENSION OF THE NATIONAL
128
191
132
motion
136
PRODUCTS OF FIELD FOREST AND MINE 17901860
149
194
157
200
177
MANUFACTURES 17901860
183
The Effect of the War of the Revolution
190
The Introduction of Steam Power
191
The Wide Diffusion of Certain Industries
192
The Industrial Stages in the United States
193
The Growth of Manufactures
194
Patents and Inventions
198
The Decline of HomeMade Manufactures
200
Manufactures of Flour and Lumber
201
Textiles
202
Iron
205
The Distribution of Manufactures
207
The Tariff Policy
209
The Acts of 1824 and 1833
210
The Tariff Acts of 1842 and 1857
211
The Labor Movement
212
The Humanitarian Movement 201 202 205 207 209 210 211 212
214
COMMERCIAL EXPANSION
217
The Second United States Bank
218
Banking Development 117 The Suffolk Bank System
220
Cotton
221
The Safety Fund System 119 The Free Bank System
222
Free Banking in Other States
223
StateOwned Banks
224
The Independent Treasury System 123 Coinage
225
Means of Communication
226
The Backward State of Improvements
227
Turnpikes
229
Gallatins Plan
230
The Cumberland Road
232
The Canal Period
233
Agricultural Products
235
The Effect of the Crisis of 1837
238
The First Railroads
239
Financing the Railroads
242
Telegraphs
243
Express Service
244
The Postal Service
245
My duorfolgun 218
248
220
252
566
258
The Results of the Movement
262
The Effects of the Civil
263
The Growth of Labor Organizations
264
265 The Farmers Movement
265
The Knights of Labor
266
267 The American Federation of Labor
267
General Purposes of the American Federation of Labor
268
Union Methods and Policies
269
Results of the Labor Movement
270
Labor Legislation
271
Employers Associations
272
Methods of Industrial Peace 274 Tariff History
274
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PERIOD
275
TERRITORIAL EXPANSION
287
91
311
The Tariff Commission 491
313
CHAPTER PAGE 179 The Source of the Leading Mineral Products
328
Iron Ore
330
Copper
332
Coal
334
Petroleum
337
Natural Gas
341
Aluminum
342
Cement 34+ 188 Stone
344
Other Minerals
345
The Rank of the United States as a Producer of Mineral Products
346
Government Aid to Commercial Development
347
II LUMBERING AND FISHERIES
348
The Uses of ByProducts
349
The Shifting Source of Timber
350
Foreign Commercial Facilities
351
Organization and Mechanical Improvements
352
International Financial Facilities
353
Foreign Commercial Organizations
354
Foreign Trade in Forest Products
355
The Merchant Marine
356
The Growth of Foreign Commerce
357
Forest Reserves
358
Fisheries 339
359
The South American Trade
360
I GOVERNMENT ENCOURAGEMENT
362
The Growth of Agriculture
363
The Causes of Growth
366
Government Encouragement
368
Agricultural Experiment Stations
370
Agricultural Education
371
Agricultural Co÷peration
372
The Federal Farm Loan System
374
The Land Policy of the United States
378
Irrigation
382
92
386
II DEVELOPMENT OF THE INDUSTRY
387
Farm Management
391
The Production of Cereals
395
The Export of Breadstuffs
398
Stock Raising
399
227
416
The Cause of Growth
419
229
423
230
425
The Use of Waste Materials and ByProducts
430
010
431
232
434
233
438
II GROWTH OF CERTAIN INDUSTRIES 234 Iron and Steel
440
Electrical Apparatus and Supplies
444
Automobiles
446
Agricultural implements
447
238
450
239
456
Womens ReadyMade Garments 241 Boots and Shoes
460
242
462
243
463
Slaughtering and Meat Packing
464
244
465
245
466
441 444 416 447 450 450 460 460 462 464 465 166
467
247
469
Business Under the Corporate Form
470
Corporation Evils
473
The Increasing Size of the Business Unit 251 The Combination Movement
475
What Is Trust?
481
The Number of Combinations 254 The Advantages of Combination
482
Unfair Competition
483
AntiTrust Lawg 257 The Sherman AntiTrust
485
The Dissolution of the Standard Oil Company and the American Tobacco Company
486
The Clayton Act and the Federal Trade Commis sion
487
The Webb Export
489
The Panic of 1873
507
7
520
The Increase in Mileage
521
Transcontinental Railroads 279 Credit Mobilier 280 Railroad Consolidation
527
Railroad Evils
529
Railroad Regulation
531
The Interstate Commerce Commission
532
The Amendment of the Commerce
533
Railroad Rates
535
Electric Railways
537
Inland Waterways
538
Improvement of Rivers C 289 Canals
540
Lake Transportation
542
Coastwise Trade
543
The Telegraph and Telephone
544
The Post Office
546
544
549
Specialization in Banking
550
Currency Changes
551
The Need for Banking Reform
552
The National Banking System
553
Importance of the National Banks
556
Greenbacks
557
Effects of the Greenbacks
558
Resumption of Specie Payment
560
The Silver Question
562
The BlandAllison Act 1878
563
The Sherman Act 1890
566
The Gold Standard Act 1900
568
The Revival of Business
569
The Panic of 1907
570
Shortcomings of the National Banking System
571
The AldrichVreeland Act 1908
572
The Federal Reserve Banking System
573
The Organization of the Federal Reserve System
574
The Federal Reserve Banks
575
Note Issues 316 Reserves
576
Other Provisions 318 The Growth of the Federal Reserve System
577
The Development of the Clearing House
579
Trust Companies
580
Building and Loan Associations 568 569 570 570 572 573 574 575 576 576 577 577 579 580
581
III COMMERCIAL ORGANI ZATION 322 Commercial Organization
583
The Work of the Chambers of Commerce 324 The Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America
584
326
589
Auction Markets
591
The New York Stock Exchange
592
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE 137 Domestic Commerce
594
Changes in Methods of Distribution
595
The Department Store 332 The MailOrder Business
596
Chain Stores 334 Commercial Facilities 335 Fire Insurance
599
Marine Insurance
601
Life Insurance
602
Storage
603
The Effect of Canals and Railroads on the Course of Internal Commerce
605
Advertising 341 Commercial Education
609
fu Ulic 250
622
628
626
629
629
PART V
633
THE WAR PERIOD 19141920
635
Economic Changes since 1914
636
Early War Legislation 364 Revenue Measures
639
The Bureau of WarRisk Insurance
640
The United States Shipping Board
641
The Council of National Defense
642
Food Control
645
Fuel Control
648
Labor Administration
649
The War Finance Corporation
651
The Silver Purchase
653
Railroad Administration
654
The Control of Foreign Trade
656
Summary of War Control
658
War Taxes
659
The Growth of War Industries
661
482
662
Facilities for Foreign Trade
663
Other AfterWar Measures
664
Conclusion
665
636 639
671
of of sal 486
672
487
673
489
674
252
675
642
676
648
678
259
680
649
681
260
685
671
691
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