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The troops under his command were rally from the disorder into which little more than fifty thousand they had been thrown. They admen: but he polleiled their entire vanced in confiderable force, and confidence, and was reputed equal charged the French with great to the arduous task he had ventured vigour. The dispute was long and to undertake.

bloody: the Austrians and PiedThe Austrians were under gene- montese made repeated efforts to ral Beaulieu, an officer of great liberate the troops in the castle, and experience and talents, though he directed their attacks on the centre had been unfortunate in several of the French: but there tood their actions with the French in the Ne- ground immoveably, while their therlands. On the ninth of April two wings turned the right and left heattacked a French post and forced of the adverse army, the rear of it: on the the tenth he advanced which was affailed at the same time upon them, and carried all their by another division, Surrounded in entrenchments but one. Here he this unexpected manner, they fufwas arrested by the obstinate bra- tained a dreadful defeat; two thouvery of the officer who commanded fand were flain in the action, and it. "Rampon, chief of brigade, who upwards of eight thousand made conceived that the fate of the day prisoners, including the corps under depended on the preservation of general Provara, which had fo this poft, made his officers and fol- much diftinguished itself by the dediers fwear never to abandon it. fence of the castle. This great victory They defended it accordingly dur- was obtained on the fourteenth of ing the whole night with such in- April. Among the killed were some vincible firmness, that the Austrians officers of high distinction; and of were constantly repulsed. In the the taken one was a general, and morning of the eleventh, Buona- near thirty colonels, beside inferior parte, by a circuitous movement, fell officers. Between twenty and thirty upon

the rear and flank of the ene- cannon fell into the hands of the my, who were completely routed, French, with fifteen standards, and with the loss of fifteen hundred an immense quantity of stores and killed, and more than two thousand field-equipage. Two French getaken. This battle was fought at nerals, Banal and Quanin, fell in a place called Montenotta.

this battle, which coft the victors a Eager to improve this victory, number of their bravest men. Buonaparte pursued the Austrians, Though twice defeated in so dewho had retreated to a strong posi- cisive a inanner, general Beaulieu tion at a place called Miliafimo: was by no means difpirited : colbut general Angereau forcing the lecting as many of his fcattered pallages leading to it, the Austrians troops, as formed a body of seven retired to the ruins of an old castle, thousand men he again attacked which general Provara, who com- the French with great impetuofity, manded them, haftened to surround the next morning, and drove them with an intrenchment, where he from their incampment at a village stood several attacks, and defended called Dego, where they had exa himself resolutely for five days. This pected to repose theinfelves after the afforded time to the Austrians to fatigues of the preceeding day. This unexpected attack, so far discom- with great courage, the Piedmontese posed them, that they were thrown withdrew in the night of the fixinto disorder, and compelled to teenth, abandoning Cava, which furabandon their post, after having rendered to the French. After some thrice endeavoured to retake it. retrograde motions, wherein they

More than half of the day had were closely presied by the French, been spent in theie fruitless attempts, who met however with some checks, when Buonaparte, anxious to reco- a general engageinent took place near ver a post, without which, the ad- Mondovi on the twenty-second. vantages gained by his two victories, General Colli, who commanded would have been frustrated, imme- the Piedmontese, had drawn up his diately gave orders for a large body army to great advantage; his centre to form in front of the enemy, and being covered by a strong redoubt, occupy their attention, while ano- which was resolutely defended for ther charged them on their left, a long time against all the efforts pofted at Dego. The intrepidity of the French, who loft numbers in with which French generals and its attack. It was carried at length officers headed their men, decided after repeated assaults: upon which the fate of the day. After a vigor- general Colli thought it prudent. ous defence, the Austrians were in to retreat. His loss amounted to their turn obliged togive ground, and about twelve hundred men, of whom leave the field to the French, with a thousand were taken. Of these, the loss of near two thousand men, three were generals, and four coloof wlom, about fifteen hundred nels. One general was Nain, and were made prisoners : on the side eleven standards fell into the hands of the French, numbers also fell, of the French, who loft also one of and among these general Caulla, their generals, and a considerable one of their best officers.

number of men, Thus, in the space of five days, no

The Piedmontese army, after its less than three battles were fought, defeat, crossed the river Stura, and in every one of which the French took a strong position between Coni were victorious. The Austrian and and Cherasco. Here it was attackPiedmontefe armies had, in the course ed, on the 25th, by the French, who of these engagements, been separated compelled general Colli to retire from each other: which enabled Buo- from the poft he occupied at Follano, naparte to effect a junction with a They made themselves masters of confiderable body of his army, be- Cherasco, where they took a quanfore which the Piedmontese divifion tity of cannon and large magazines, had retired, not daring to oppose it and the Piedmontese withdrew to in combination with the corps under Carignano, in order to be nearer general Augereau who had joined to Turin, for its protection against it

. After disodging the Piedmontese the French army, which was now from their redoubts, at Montezimo, advanced to within nine leagues of this officer followed them to their that city. camp before the town of Cava. It The defeat of his army, at Monwas strongly fortified, but Angereau dovi, had already determined the attacked it with such vigour, that, king of Sardinia to make overtures after defending it the whole day of peace to Buonaparte. General 10

Colli

Colli was directed to apply to him completely humbled, who had long for that purpose, and propoļed a been considered as the most secure fnfpenfion of arms, while the peace of any, by his position, against the was negociating. But he refused inroads of the French: his predeto fufpend his operations, unless the ceffors, though frequently hard prefking delivered two strong towns led by them, had never been reinto his hands, as pledges of the duced to such extremities, and nefincerity of his intentions, and im- ver experienced such disgrace. By mediately dispatched commissioners this treaty he was despoiled of all to Paris.

power and consequence; and though The king's fituation was so criti. he retained the title of the king, cal, that he was obliged to comply he remained no more than the nowith this requisition, and the French minal fovereign of his dominions. were put in possession of Cava, The reduction of the king of Coni, and Tortona. The Austrians, Sardinia was an event that changed thus deprived of their ally, were at once the whole face of Italy. obliged to fall back on the Milanese. That prince was no longer master In their march they attempted to of the barriers that nature has fixed fieze the town of Alessandria, be- between that country and France, longing to the king of Sardinia, and from which he derived his prinbut the commandant prevented the cipal importance. They were now execution of this design, and Bcau- in the hands of the French, and the lieu hastened to cross the Po, in or- Italian powers, deprived of this der to cover himself and the country rampart of their dominior»; saw to the north of that river.

themselves at the mercy of a people, In the mean time, negociations for who had, for many centuries, enpeace were carried on at Paris, be- deavoured to obtain a footing atween the king of Sardinia and the mong them, with the manifest design French republic, which impoled of subjecting them to their influence. severe conditions on this unfortunate These astonishing successes could prince. He was constrained to not fail to inspire the French aryield up Savoy, the patrimony of mies, that had obtained them, with his ancestors for many ages, toge- the highest degree of exultation : ther with the city and territory of nor did their commander forget to Nice, and a tract of land, which the improve the sentiments of self apconquerors entitled the Department plause and confidence, manifested by of the Maritime Alps. A new ar- them, into that difpofition of mind rangement was made of the fron, which would lead them on to those tiers on each side, highly advantage- farther exploits he had in contemous to France. He consented to plation. He issued an address to ftop and put an end to all prosecu- them on the twenty-sixth of April, tions against any of his subjects for three days after the application for their political opinions, to withdraw peace from the Sardinian monarch, himself from the coalition, and to wherein he recapitulated, in a truly apologise for his conduct towards the classical and energetic style, the republic. Such were the principal glory they had acquired, and repreterms of the treaty.

lented that which lay ftill before In this manner was the prince them. I

- You

unexpected attack, so far discom- with great courage, the Piedmontese posed them, that they were thrown withdrew in the night of the fix. into disorder, and compelled to teenth, abandoning Cava, which furabandon their post, after having rendered to the French. After some thrice endeavoured to retake it. retrograde motions, wherein they

More than half of the day had were closely pressed by the French, been spent in these fruitless attempts, who met however with some checks, when Buonaparte, anxious to reco- a general engageinent took place near ver a post, without which, the ad- Mondovi on the twenty-second. vantages gained by his two victories, General Colli, who commanded would have been frustrated, imme- the Piedmontese, had drawn up his diately gave orders for a large body army to great advantage; his centre to form in front of the enemy, and being covered by a strong redoubt, occupy their attention, while ano- which was resolutely defended for ther charged them on their left, a long time against all the efforts posted at Dego. The intrepidity of the French, who lost numbers in with which the French generals and its attack. It was carried at length officers headed their men, decided after repeated allaults: upon which the fate of the day. After a vigor- general Colli thought it prudent ous defence, the Austrians were in 10 retreat. His loss amounted to their turn obliged togiveground, and about twelve hundred men, of whom leave the field to the French, with a thousand were taken. Of these, the loss of near two thousand men, three were generals, and four coloof whom, about fifteen hundred nels. One general was sain, and were made prisoners : on the fide eleven standards fell into the hands of the French, numbers also fell, of the French, who lost also one of and among these general Caufla, their generals, and a considerable one of their best officers.

number of men. Thus, in the space of five days, no The Piedmontese army, after its less than three battles were fought, defeat, crofled the river Stura, and in

every one of which the French took a strong position between Coni were victorious. The Austrian and and Cherasco. Here it was attackPiedmontese armies had, in the course ed, on the 25th, by the French, who of these engagements, been separated compelled general Colli to retire from each other: which enabled Buo- from the post he occupied at Follano. naparte to effect a junction with a They made themselves masters of confiderable body of his army, be- Cherasco, where they took a quanfore which the Piedmontese divifion tity of cannon and large magazines, had retired, not daring to oppose it and the Piedmontese withdrew to in combination with the corps under Carignano, in order to be nearer general Augereau who had joined to Turin, for its protection against it. After dislodging the Piedmontese the French army, which was now from their redoubts, at Montezimo, advanced to within nine leagues of this officer followed them to their that city. camp before the town of Cava. It The defeat of his army, at Monwas strongly fortified, but Augereau dovi, had already determined the attacked it with such vigour, that, king of Sardinia to make overtures after defending it the whole day of peace to Buonaparte. General 10

Colli

they might have done for native having seized a number of boats, princes.

rowed to the other fide, protected To the praises bestowed by Buo- by fo heavy a discharge of mulketry, naparte on his army, the directory that the enemy was obliged to readded its acknowledgments to him, tire, and leave them to land, which and those of his officers who had they did in the compacteft order. signalized themselves in the late This was effected on the seventh of actions. It wrote to them feparately, May. As soon as Beaulieu was apSpecifying, in the most gracious and prised of it, equally astonished at an latisfactory manner, the particular event he had lo little expected, and motives for which the thanks of the anxious to repair the mistake he had public were due to them.

committed, he selected the best of This homage paid to their me- his troops, with whom he advanced rit, in the name of the nation, on the French, in hope of coming by those who were invested with upon them before a sufficient numits supreme authority, was received, ber could have crosed to secure the by the French officers, as the highest pallage of the rest : but they were honour that could be conferred not only on his side of the river, upon them, to be considered as de- but marching towards him. On reserving of it was now become the ceiving this intelligence, he infummit of their wishes; so effectually trenched himself at Fombio, a vilhad the republican notions of patri- lage advantageously situated, exotism taken possession of their minds, pecting the arrival of reinforce

The moment after the suspension ments: but he was immediately of arms between the French and attacked on every side by the the king of Sardinia had been figned, French, who forced him to break Buonaparte loft no time in availing up his canıp in the utmost disorder, himself of it to the utmost. He in and with the loss of a large quanftantly put his army in motion from tity of horses and baggage, as well all quarters, in order to cross the as of men. Po, and to render it doubtful to Another body of Austrians was, the enemy, by his various move- in the mean time, hastening to his ments, at what place he would at, aid, and came up with the French tempt the pallage over that river. early the next morning ; but geThe Austrian general did not doubt neral Laharpe, an officer of great but the French would endeavour to merit and intrepidity, charged them pass it at the town of Valenza, which with such vigour, that they were they had ftipulated with the Sar- instantly defeated, and put to flight. dinian ministry, should be ceded to The loss of this officer, who fell them for that purpose. For this on this occasion, was more than a reason, he made every disposition counterpoife to the success of the necessary to obstruct their passage at French. He was a Swiss by birth; this place: bat Buonaparte deceived and, being driven from his country, him; and, by rapid marches, reached on account of his republican printhe banks of the Po, oppofite to ciples, he took refuge in France, the city of Placenza. A body of and entered into the service of the horse prepared to oppose him ; but republic, where his military talents a chofen corps of French infantry, raised him to the rank of a general.

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