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Venus," when o will be 30 N. of Spica and (October 22) less than 1° S. of 9. At he close of the year he will be in m close to and above (N.) of the red star Antares,

Jupiter will be brightest March 31, as an evening star. He will be an evening tar from January 4 to October 19, and a morning star until January 4 and after Detober 19. At the beginning of the year he will be in mand remain in that conItellation until November, when he enters - October 1 he will pass 30 N. of Spica, etting in the evening twilight. The superior planets, those exterior to the earth, bay be very properly called "all night stars at or close to the time of their opposiion, or when they rise at sunset and set at sunrise. This will be approximately the ase with 4 until March 31.

Saturn will be brightest October 27, being at that time an all night star. He nay also be considered an evening star until April 16 and after July 30, and as a norning star from April 16 to July 30. He will be in eastern # and will cross the ine into p and return again into # at the close of the year. At no time will he be near any bright stars for which he might be mistaken. His wonderful ring system will be best seen during the summer months.

Uranus will be brightest July 16 as an evening star, and then only faintly visible to the naked eye.

Neptune will be brightest as an evening star January 8. Both Uranus and Neptune are too distant and faint to be objects of general interest.

ECLIPSES, 1910. There will be four eclipses this year, two of the Sun and two of the Moon, as follows:

I. Total of the Sun, May 9, invisible in the United States, visible in the Southern Pacific and Indian Oceans.

II. Total of the Moon, May 23-24, beginning on the evening of the 23d, and visible in North, Central and South America, except Alaska. Visible as follows:

Partiall Total

Total Partial
Standard

Begins, Begins Middle Ends Ends
Time.

H.M. | H.M. | H.M. | H.M. | H.M. nter-Colonial

11 46 1 9 1 341 1 59 3 22 Eastern .....

10 46 0 9 0 34 0 59 2 22 Dentral

9 46 11 9 11 34 11 59 1 22 Mountain ...

8 46 10 9 10 34 10 59 Pacific

7 46 9 9 9 34 9 59 11 22 Alaskan ...

1 6 46 | 8 9 8 34 1 8 59 | 10 22 Hawaiian ....

.......1 *5 15 6 38 7 3 7 28 8 51 *Before sunset.

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FIG. 1

it sunset. Piemi size, a digitthe sun will set mo

III. Partial of the Sun, November 2, invisible in United States, except Alaska ind Hawaiian Islanås. Visible as follows: i Yakutat, Alaska, marks the eastern limit of the eclipse. Throughout Alaska Test of Yakutat, and Hawaii, the sun will set more or less eclipsed. Begins, Honoulu, 3:45 p. m.; size, 1 digit. Begins, Nome, Alaska, 1:39 p. m.; size, 5 digits IV. Total of the Moon, November 16, visible as follows:

See Fig. 1, upper por

tion, for the path of Partiall Total |

| Total Partial the Moon through the Standard Begins Begins Middle Ends | Ends

Earth's shadow, from Time.

H.M. | H.M. | H.A. | H.M. | H.M. West to East, passing nter-Colonial

6 447 55 8:11 8 47 9 58 from (a) to (c) in 2h. Castern

5 44 655 7 21 1 7 47 | 8 58 7m. entral

4 441 5 55 6 21 6 47 | 7 58 As the figure indicates, Countain

Moon 4 55 5 21 5 47 6 58 the first eclipse of the acific

4 21 4 475 28 Moon, May 23-24, occurs laskan..

Eclipsed. 4 58 when the Moon is at her iawaiiant

ascending node, while finvisible.

this one takes place at the other or descending

node. VESTA. THE PLANETOID. Vesta, the brightest of the Asteroids and the only one ever visible to the haided eye when brightest, may be seen in September and October, being brightest

October 28. She will then be in the constellation Cetus, the whale. Her motior all be westward past the stars in the head of the whale. The last of September le will be almost two degrees from the brightest star of the constellation, Menkar krly in November, five degrees north of Mira, the wonderful variable star. It will

interesting to watch her pass one degree north of Gamma Ceti on October 10, and Ur degrees north of Delta Ceti on the 13th. These stars are of the fourth magtude or about two degrees brighter than Vesta. On October 28 Vesta will be

the meridian at midnight and about 47 degrees up from the southern horizon ir titude 40 degrees. She will not be well situated for visibility again until Febru7, 1912

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T -Sets

-Sets

-Rises

T -Sets-H MH MH M HMH MH M Η ΜΗ ΜΗ Μ Η ΜΗ ΜΗΝ January...

11 3 01 8 281 8 11 6 251 0 44 0 52 6 100 0 14 0 24 622° 0 361 04 January.. 11 2 39 8 15 8 3 6 5 0 301 0 41 5 33/11 47 11 52 5 44 11 54 11 5 January...

2 5 7 48 7 39|| 5471 0 17 0 31 4 56/11 10/11 16 5 6 11 17 11 21 February

1 10 6 571 6 50 | 5 281 0 4 0 18|| 4 13 10 27110 33|| 4 25 10 February...

dolRisess 5 11 11 50 0 11 3 29 9 43 9 48 3 49 10 2110 February. 21 12th mo. mo. 4 56 11 39 0 3 252 9 5 9 10

9 29 9 31 March...

1/10 281 4 481 4 59 4 44 11 31 11 55 2 18 8 251 8 35 March... 111 9 531 4 17|

4 30)11 21 11 47 1 351 747) 8 0 | 2 9 8 23 83 March. 9 31 3

0 47) Sets

1 34 750 751 April..

9 171 3

4 2 11 0 11 30 11 581 5 571 5 54|| 0 561 7 13 72 April..

9 10
3 49/10 1011

SOS Rises April.

3 21
3 37/10 39 11

Inv.) mo. mg May..

3 123
3 25 10 28 10 58 I 9 481 3

11 14 4 541 4 4 May..

9

1 3 3 13 10 15 10 46 9 6 3 9 3 7 10 381 4 17 4 Мау.

0 10 0 10 31 8 251 2

10 3 3 41 3 3 June

2 471 9 45 10 15 741) 1

9 25 3 21 2 5 June 9 131 291 9 56 17 2 1

849 2 251 2 June 9 19

9 38 624 0 27

8 14 1 501 13 July

5 4711

37| 1 12 1 July... 9 36

5 1111

7 11 0 351 0 2 July.... 9471

4 36 1 10 29 6 24 12 0 11 4 August.. 10 11

1 22 7 54 8 10 3 59 9 531 9 491 5 43 11 21/11 August... 11/10 13 3

1 7 7 331 7.46 3 251 9 18] 9 14 5 410 42 10 August.... 21 10 251

0 51 7 11 7 21 2 52 8 43 8 38 4 25/10 3 September. 1/10 361 3 561 3 36 0 34 6 486 55 2 16 8 6 7 59 3 41 9 19 9 September.. 11/10 461

0 181 6 26 6 30|| 1 44 7 311 724 September.. 21/10 53

23|| Ot Rises, 1 12 6 57 6 49 2 24 8 21 October 1/11 ol

mo. mo. 0 411 6 24 6 16 1 381 7 17 October.. 11/11 6

11 31 5401 5 45

6011 Rises

Il 0 561 6 361 62 October 21/11 13)

11 151 5 311 5 39 Inv. mo. mo.|| 0 101 5 511 5 3 November.. 1/11 211 5 591 6 1 11 0 5 221 5 33 11 41 5 271 5 39|| 11 23) -Sets November... 11/11 301 671 6 25 10 461 5 141 2810 33) 4 581 5 10 November... 21 80* Sets

5 24 9 581 4 241 4 38 9 59 4 24 43 December.. 1] Inv.l eve.) eve. 10 2014 5 19 9 30 3

3 581 4 12 December.. 111 0 91 5 111 4 41| 10 8 4

52) 514

8 581 3 271 3 42 8 36 3 1 3 1 December 21) 0 25 5 25) 4 55|| 9 571 4 451 5 10 8 26 2 57 3 12|| 7561 2 21 23 December.... 31/ 0 401 5 43 5 13 1 9471 4 401 5 6 7 53 2 241 2 411 7 16 1 411 15

*26th. +27th. $19th. $16th. SITUATION OF THE PLANETS FOR THE SUNDAYS; ALSO MOON'S POSI

TION FOR THE YEAR.

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Explanation of Signs. Aries. 8 Taurus. O Gemini.

O Cancer.

Cancer. Leo. m Virgo. ^ Libra. m Scorpio. I Sagittarius. Capricornus. Aquarius. Pisces. The place indicated for the planets is for the first, second, third, fourth and fifth Sundays of each month, in the order of the planets.

Note. -The Moon will "run high" from "Lowest” to “Highest," and "run low". from "Highest” to “Lowest.” The Full Moon will be highest of the year at meridian passage December 16 and lowest June 22. She will begin to run lower March 21 and decrease in altitude until June 22, and then increase ("run higher") until December 21, after which she will gradually get lower until June 22. This because the Full Moon must always be on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, and hence when the Sun is lowest in declination the Moon must be highest, and when the Sun is highest the Moon must be lowest. The difference between extremes being 57°or (23 42° +5°)x2, 5° being the inclination of the orbit of the Moon to the ecliptic.

PLANETARY CONJUNCTIONS AND OTHER EVENTS FOR 1910.

Mo.Day.

Mo. Day.

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Time.

H.M. in Perihelion.....

6

am. 9 4 3 11's.

11 am. C. 34 90° w.

pm. rea test brillian

am. h 90° E.

pm, V 180° E. or W

pm. Elong. E. 19° 3..7 am.

12 : . 7° 43' N. 10 pm. h 1° 34' N. 1

am. Ź 90° E. of O. pm. D.. 4° 25' N.

am. Stationary.

am. O Inferior.

am. Stationar

am. 19. 242 'S.

pm. Ferihelion.

pm. 2 13° 34' N.

Inferior
h 1° 18' N.
43° 1'N'

pm. 2° 2

am. 3 3 18 8.

pm. nary.

pm. 9 11° 52' N.

pm. h 0° 58' N. htest.

pm. P, Spg. begins.

am. 2° 31' S.

am. 27 180° E. or w am. Superior.

pm. $ 7° 42' N.

am. 50° 40 N.

am. 20 21' N

am.

pm. 90° W. of

pm. invisible.

pm. I 2° 48' S.

am. of O. 46° 13'

am. PO 2 r.EI.

am.

pm. 0° 23' N.

pm. 1. Inv. 1° 57' s.

7 38 am. 13° 5' s.

1 59 am. otal eclipse.

Visible, Inferior.

0

pm. Aphelion,

pm. 1° 59 N.

pm. statio

am. am. am. am. pm.

am. 1. W. of O, 22

pm. O, Sum. begins. | 2 32 am.

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Time. H.M 9 37 pm.

0 47 am. Aphelion.

pm. Ć 3° 52' S.

pm.

am. 24 2° 58' S.

2 pm. [ 180° E. or

am. Superior.

am. h 0° 52' s.

am. h 90° W. of O. am. $ 4° 7' S.

pm. 0° 5' N

am. 4° 11' s.

am. pm. pm.

am. 37 pm.

pm. 54 pm.

1 33 am. 7° 25' s.

0 58 pm. 2° 3' S.

7 45 am. h 1° 31' s. 6 22 pm. Aut. begins.

5 14 pm. § 4° 10' S.

pm. Inferior.

am. invisible. . 3 3* 2 S.

pm. 1° 55' s.

am. D. 1° 31' S. . El. W. of 18°.

pm. am.

pm. 4 invisible.

pm. h D. 1° 28' S.

4 am. 5. & 00 45' N.

pm. O. 180° E. or W 4 am. § 1° 5' N.

am. 0° 11' N.

pm.

pm.

948 pm, 0° 28' s 6 37 am rtial eclipse. Invisible. ŏ 0° 10' s.

am. ŏ 0° 33' s.

am. Superior.

am. h D. h 1° 13' S.

8 53 am tal eclipse,

Visible. Superior.

8 am. 240° 23' S. 4 1 pm 3. Oc. .

pm $ $. 2° 2' N.

pm h 1° 2' s.

pm. ent.is, Winter begins 11 50 Gr. El. w. of O, 20°. pm 24 0° 16' N.

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gures in the table "Sidereal noon" following this note. Note whether the figures be 'Morn" or "Eve." If "Morn' and the sum is more than 12 hours, the result rill be evening of the same day; if "Eve" and the sum is more than 12 hours, he result will be morning of the next day. Having found the time of meridian assage, for the rising subtract and for the setting add the numbers opposite the ame of the star in the column headed "For Rising and Setting," observing the irections as to "Morn" and "Eve,” as given a bove. Those stars marked

in he last column are circumpolar and do not rise or set in the latitude of New York ity. Stars having an asterisk (*) in the last column are only to be seen in the far outh and when near the meridian, as the vapors of the horizon will obscure them t rising and setting.

To tell how high up from the nearest point of the horizon a star will be at its neridian passage, subtract the declination of the star from 90°, and if the result is ess than the latitude of the place of the observer that star will neither rise nor set, ut is circumpolar, and the difference between that result and the latitude shows the tar's altitude above the north point of the horizon or below the southern horizon. Or, (90° -- dec.) -latitude = altitude or elevation of the star above the nearest point f the horizon at meridian passage for stars of a south declination. Examples: idereal noon, November 4.... ...... 9 06 p. m. Fomalhaut in meridian" column..... 22 48

31 54 Subtract ........

24 0

7 64 p. m. of the 5th=Time of meridian passage. 7 54 p. m.

7 54 P. m. Less 4 00 in "Rising and Setting" column.

Plus 4 00

3 54 p. m. = Time of rising.

11 54 p. m, = Time of setting. Declination of Fomalhaut = 30° south; therefore 90° -30° = 60° -40° = 20° Ititude of Fomalhaut in latitude 40° north at the time of the meridian passage of hat star. To measure celestial distances with the eye, keep in mind that one-third f the distance from the zenith to the horizon is 30°. For smaller measurements use he "Pointers" in the "Big Dipper,” which are nearly 5° apart-a convenient celestial init because always in sight. The "Yardstick" or "Ell and Yard" in Orion, or the 'Kings,” is just 3° long, or 142° each way from the central star (see Star table). Vhen the declination of a star is such as to bring it nearer to the zenith than to the Jorizon at meridian passage, use its zenith distance to locate it. The difference etween latitude and declination = zenith distance. If declnation is greater than latiude. such difference is to be counted northward (otherwise southward) from zenith.

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IDEREAL NOON OR MERIDIAN PASSAGE OF THE VERNAL EQUINOX. (For use in connection with the Star Table. See Note under same.)

P. M. figures black. Jan. | Feb. Mch. Apr. (May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. | Dec. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. H. M. 5 171 3 151 1 25 11 23 9 25 7 23 5 25 3 24 1 22 11 201 9 18 7 20 31 3 11 1 21 11 19 9 21 7 19 5 22 3 20 1 18 11 16 9 14 7 3 71 17/11 15 9 171 7

3 16 1 14|11 12 9 10 1 13 11 11

1 10 11 81 96 1 9 11 8

1 611 1 5 11 4

1 2 11 54 2 521 1 2111 0

0 58/10 | 05810

0 541 441 0 54 10

0 5011 2 401 0 50 10

0 461 2 361 046 10

0 42 10 2 321 0 42 10 40

0 38/10 281 0 38 10

0 3410 33 1 0 34 10 32

311 221 2 201 0 30110 28 6....... 0 26 10 24

0 23/10 211 141 2 1 0 22 10 20

201 4 231 2 0 19/10 171
0 18/10 16

6 171 4 191 2 0 15 10 131
0 14110
6 13 4 151

0 11 10 9
0 10110

91 4 111 2 0 7 10 5 571 0 610

03/10 1 1 5310 3110 1

111 551 9 | 1 49111 591 9 57

591 1 57 11 51 9 711 45111 551 953

551 1 53 11 471 3) 1 41|11 511 9 49 7 511 5 49 3 51 1 49 11 431 9 1 37|11 471 9 45 7 47) 5 451 3 471 1 45 11 39 351 1 33/11 431 9 41 7 431 5 411 3 43 1 41 11 311 1 29 11 391 9 37 7 391 5 371 3 391 1 37 11 321 341 732) 5 34

11 351 9 33 7 351 5 331 3 351 1 33 11 281 9 301 7 28 5 30 111 311 9 29 7 311 5 291 3 311 1 30 11 241 9 261 7241 5 26 |11 271

3 271 1 26

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