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the thumb perpendicularly to form a square.)- The second part is called the hailing sign and is given by throwing the left hand up in this manner (horizontal from the shoulder to the elbow and perpendicular from the elbow to the ends of the fingers.) It took its rise at the time when Joshua fought the battles of the Lord in the valley of Repbidim : and from the memorable event of Moses having his hands supported by his brother Aaron, whilst Joshua was fighting the Amalekites. It was also the position of Joshua, when be prayed fervently to the almighty to continue the light of day, that he might complete the overthrow of his enemy. And Moses also, when be came down from the mount, hailed his brethren with this double sign (the first and second part) in order to arrest their attention, as a signal for them to attend to what he was about to deliver, and as a pledge of his sincerity and truth, and also of the importance of what he was about to declare, This was the origin of the sign, and on the morning, that the foundation stone of the Temple was laid, King Solomon adopted the same double sign: the right hand as a token of the sincerity of his holiness and piety towards God, and the left hand as a token of an upright hand and heart, in earnest prayer, imploring the blessing of the most bigh on their pious undertaking, in erecting the temple of Jerusalem to bis holy service. The third part is called the penal sign and is given by drawing the band across the breasts and dropping it to the side. This is in allusion to the penalty of your obligation, implying, that, as a man of honour and a Fellow Craft, you would rather have your heart torn from your breast, than to improperly divulge the secrets of this degree. The grip or token is given by a distinct pressure of the thumb on the second joint of the band, or that of the middle finger. This demands a word; a word to be given and received with the same strict caution as the one in the former degree, either by letters or syllables. The word is JACHIN. As in the course of the evening, you will be called on for this word, the Senior Deacon will nowdictate the answers you have to give.

S. D. What is this?
Noodle. The grip or token of a Fellow Craft Free Mason..
S: D. What does it demand ?
Noodle. A word.
S. D. Will you give me that word?

Noodle. I was taught to be cautious in this degree, as well as in the former: I will letter or halve it with you.

S. D. Which you please and begin.
Noodlc. Ja.

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S. D. Chin.
Noodle. Jachin.

W.M This word is derived from the right-hand pillar of the porch or entrance to King Solomon's Temple. The import of the word is to establish, and, when joined with the one in the former degree, signifies stability. (To the Senior Deacon). Pass Brother Noodle to the Junior Warden. S. D. Brother Junior Warden, I present to

you,

Brother Noodle, on being passed to the second degree.

J. W. I will thank Brother Noodle to advance towards me as a Fellow Craft. (Noodle makes the step and gives the sign). What is that?

Noodle. The hailing sign or sign of prayer.

J. W. Have you any thing else to communicate ? (Noodle gives him the grip or token.) What is this?

Noodle. The grip or token of a Fellow Craft Freemason.
J. W. What does it demand?
Noodle. A word.
J. W. Will you give me that word ?

Noodle. I was taught to be cautious, in this degree, as well as the former ; I will letter or halve it with you.

J. W. Which you please and begin.
Noodle. Ja.
J. W. Chin.
Noodle. JAChin. He is then passed to the Senior Warden).

S. D. Brother Senior Warden, I present to you, Brother Noodle, on being passed to the second degree.*

S. W: I will thank Brother Noodle to advance to me as a Fellow Craft. (He advances with the step of the second degree.)

S. W. What is that?
Noodle. The second regular step in Freemasonry.
S. W. Do you bring any thing else with you?
Noodle. I do. (Gives the sign of fidelity.)
S. W. What is that?

Noodle. The sign of fidelity, emblematic of shielding the repository of my secrets from the attacks of the cowan.

S. W. Do you bring anything else with you?
Noodle. I do. (Gives the hailing sign.)
S. W. What is that?
Noodle. The hailing sign or sign of prayer.
S. W. Whence did it arise ?
Noodle. At the time when Joshua, &c. (See former account.)
S. W. Do you bring any thing else with you?
Noodle. I do. (Gives the penal sign).

* These passings and presentings are always done by the Senior Deacon's accosting the officer with three knocks. In fact, these knockings are introduced as often as possible.

S. W. What is that?
Noodle. The penal sign of a Fellow Craft Freemason.
S. W. To what does it allude?

Noodle. To the penalty of my obligation, implying, that as a man of honour and a Fellow Craft Mason, I would rather have my heart torn from my breast, than to improperly divulge the secrets of this degree. 's. W. Have you any thing else to communicate ? Noodle. I have. (Gives the grip or token). S. W. What is this? Noodle. The grip or token of a Fellow Craft. S. W. What does it demand ? Noodle. A word. S. W. Will you give me that word ?

Noodle. I was taught to be cautious in this degree as well as in the former; I will letter or halve it with you.

S. W. Which you please and begin.
Noodle. Ja.
S. W. Chin.
Noodle. JACHIN.
S. W. From whence is this word derived ?
Noodle. From the right-hand pillar of the porch or entrance to
King Solomon's Temple.

S. W. The import of the word?
Noodle. To establish.

S. W. And what when conjoined with the one in the former degree.

Noodle. Stability. (He is then passed back to the master.)

S. W. Worshipful master, I present to you, Brother Noodle, for some further mark of your favour.

W.M. Brother Senior Warden, I delegate you to invest himwith the distinguishing badge of a Fellow Craft Mason.*

S. W. Brother Noodle, by the Worshipful Master's command, I invest you with the distinguishing badge of a Fellow Craft, to mark the progress you have made in the science.

W. M. Let me add to what has been stated by the Senior Warden, that the badge, with which you have just been invested, points out to you, that, as a craftsman, you are expected to make the liberal arts and sciences your future study, that you may the better be enabled to discover your duty as a Mason and estimate the wonderful works of the almighty. Brother Senior Deacon, you will place our Brother Noodle at the south-east part of the lodge. Being so placed, he is thus addressed by the Master.)

Brother Noodle, Masonry being a progressive science wben you were made an Entered Apprentice, you were

* I should have explained in describing the first degree, that this badge is a wbite leather aproo, variously ornamented for the different degrees.

placed at the North East part of the Lodge, to show, that you were newly admitted. You are now placed at the South East part, to mark the progress you have made in the science. You now stand to all external appearance, a just and upright Fellow Craft Mason, I give it to you in strong terms of recommendation, to continue and act as such, aud as I trust the import of the former charge neither is nor ever will be effaced from your memory, I shall content myself with observing, that, as in the former degree you made yourself acquainted with the principles of moral truth and virtue, you are now permitted to extend your researches into the hidden mysteries of nature and science.--I now present you with the working tools of a Fellow Craft Mason, which are the square, level, and plumb.rule. The square, is to try and adjust all irregular corners of buildings, and to assist in bringing rude matter into due form. The level, to lay levels and to prove borizontals: and the plumb-rule, to try and adjust all uprights, while fixing on their proper bases. As we are not all operative masons, but rather free and accepted, or speculative, we apply those tools to our morals. In this sense, the square teaches morality, the level equality, and the plumb-rule justness and uprightness of life and action. Thus, by square conduct, level steps and upright intentions, we hope to ascend to those immortal mansions, from whence all goodness emanates. You are now at liberty to retire, iu order to restore yourself to your personal comforts, and on your return to the lodge, I shall call your attention to an explanation of the Tracing Board, if time will permit. (On his return he is placed in the West and returns thanks in the following words.)

Worshipful Master, Senior and Junior Wardens, Senior and Junior Deacons and Brethren of this lodge, I return you my most hearty and sincere thanks, for the honour you bave done me this evening, in passiog me to the honourable degree of a Fellow Craft Mason. LECTURE ON THE TRACING BOARD IN THE SECOND DEGREE.

At the building of King Solomon's Temple, an immense number of Masons were employed. They consisted of Entered Apprentices and Fellow Crafts. The Entered Apprentices received a weekly allowance of corn, wine and oil. The Fellow Crafts were paid their wages in specie, which they went to receive in the middle chamber of the temple. They got there by way of a porch, at the entrance of which, their attention was particularly struck by two great pillars:

that, on the left, was called Boaz, which denotes strength: that, on right, Jachin, which denotes, to establish; and when conjoined, stability; for God said, in strength will I establish this mine-house to stand firm for ever*. The height of those pillars was thirty-five cubits, the circumfereuce twelve, the diameter three. They were formed hollow, the better to serve as archives to masonry ; for therein were deposited the constitutional rolls. Being formed hollow, the outer rim or shell was four inches, or a hand's breadth in thickness. They were made of molten brass and were cast on the plains of the Jordan, in the clay grounds between Succoth and Zeredatba. The superintendant of the casting was Hiram A biff. Those pillars were adorned with two chapiters, each five cubits high. Those chapiters were enriched with net work, lily-work and pomeganates. Network, from the connection of its meshes, denotes unity. Lily-work, from its whiteness denotes peace. And pomegranates, from the exuberance of their seed, denotės plenty. Those pillars were further adorned with two spherical balls, on which were delineated maps of the celestial and terrestrial globes. They were considered finished, when the net work or canopy was thrown over them. They were placed at the east of the temple, as a memorial to the children of Israel of the miraculous pillars of fire and cloud, which had two wonderful effects, the fire to give light to the Israelites during their escape from their Egytian bondage; the cloud proved darkness to Pharaoh and his followers, when they attempted to 'overtake them. King Solomon ordered them to be placed at the entrance of the Temple, as the most proper and conspicuous situation for the children of Israel, to bave the happy deliverance of their forefathers continually before their eyes, at going to and returning from divine worship. After our ancient brethren had passed those two great pillars, their ascent was opposed by the Junior Warden, who demanded of them the pass-grip and pass-word, leading from the first to the second degree. The pass-word, I dare say you recollect, is Shibboleth, and is here depicted by an ear of corn near a fall of water. The word Shibboleth dates its origin from the time, that an army of Ebpraimites crossed the river Jordan, in a hostile manner, against Jeptha, the renowned Gileaditish General. The reason assigned for this up friendly visit was, that they had not been called out to partake of

* It is down, it seems, like all other masonry !

R. C.

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