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Approved by the Department of History, Politics

and Economics, June 1911.

DEC 9 1919

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

PRESS

NOTE

The work for this thesis was undertaken at the suggestion of Professor Edward Elliott, Dean of the College of Princeton University, to whom I wish to express my appreciation and gratitude for his assistance, and helpful criticism. I am also indebted to Professor Robert McNutt McElroy and Professor Alexander Thomas Ormond for the assistance and direction they have given me in this undertaking. I desire also to express my sincere thanks to Dr. Andrew F. West, Dean of the Graduate School of Princeton University, for the help and advice he has given me during the period of this investigation.

NEUTRALITY AS INFLUENCED BY THE UNITED

STATES

CHAPTER 1.

HISTORY OF NEUTRALITY DOWN TO 1776 A.D.
I. Historical Introduction.

Opinion of Text-writers.
II. Freedom of Neutral Commerce.
A. Ownership of Goods and of Vessel.

Holland, France, Spain, Russia, Prussia and Great

Britain.
B. Limitations of Neutral Commerce.

Contraband of War.
Blockade.

Right of Visit and Search.
III. Neutral Jurisdiction.

CHAPTER 2
HISTORY OF NEUTRALITY FROM 1776 TO 1793.

I. Introductory Remarks.
II. European Practice during this Period.
A. Unneutral conduct of European Powers during the

American War of Independence.
French service to the American Revolution and the

treaty of 1778 (premature recognition of inde-
pendence). Steps leading to the declaration of
war against France by Great Britain, and the

treaty of Amiens.
B. Disregard of neutral commerce.

French attitude changed.
British Orders in Council and the revival of the

Rule of the War of 1756.
The attitude of other states, leading to the First

League of Armed Neutrality.
Laws neglected by all powers during the French

Revolutionary War.

III. American Practice of Neutrality.
A. General History.

Treaties in general.
Stipulations embodied in the treaty of 1778, leading

to international complications and to the Procla

mation of Neutrality.
B. Neutral Jurisdiction.

Genet affair and the Proclamation.
(1) No belligerent court in neutral territory.

(2) Positive duty of a neutral government.
C. Freedom of commerce.

Free ship, free goods, and enemy ship, enemy goods.
D. Limitations of neutral commerce.

Contraband of war.
Blockade.
Right of visit and search.

CHAPTER 3

HISTORY OF NEUTRALITY FROM 1793 TO 1818.
I. European Practice of Neutrality.
A. Disregard of Neutral Commerce.

(1) French Decrees.
(2) British Orders in Council.
(3) Second Armed Neutrality.
(4) British Impressment of Seamen.

(5) The War of 1812.
II. American Practice of Neutrality.
A. American Practice in General.

(1) The Jay Treaty.
(2) Relations with the French Republic.

(3) Spanish-American Movements.
B. Neutrality Acts.

(1) Legislative Enactments.
III. Freedom of Neutral Commerce.
IV. Limitations of Neutral Commerce.
A. Contraband of War.

(1) Contraband in General.

(2) Doctrine of Continuous Voyage. B. Blockade.

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