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THE

WHEELER & WILSON

MANUFACTURING CO., 625 Broadway, N. Y.

Was awarded at the World's Exposition, Vienna, 1873,

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THE GRAND MEDAL FOR MERIT,

THE GRAND MEDAL FOR PROGRESS, and was THE ONLY SEWING-MACHINE COMPANY recommended by the International Jury for the GRAND DIPLOMA OF HONOR..

The Wheeler & Wilson Family Machine, Vas the first introduced into the household for general use. For more than twenty years it has stood unrivalled for durability, speed, simplicity of construction, and ease of operation. It is adapted to all kinds of Family Sewing, and to the use of Seamstresses, Dressmakers, Manufacturers of Shirts, Collars, Skirts, Cloaks, Mantillas, Clothing, Hats, Caps, Linen Goods, Umbrellas, Parasols, etc. They work equally well upon silk, linen, woolen and cotton goods, with silk, cotton, or linen thread. They will seam, quilt, gather, hem, fell, cord, braid, bind, and perform every species of sewing, making a beautiful and perfect stitch, alike on both sides of the article sewed. 850,000 in use. 500 manufactured and sold daily.

Wheeler & Wilson's New No. 6 Machine,

especially designed for Leather Work and heavy Tailoring, combines with all the excellent qualities of their FAMILY MACHINE, many novel features of great importance, which render it as superior for manufacturing purposes as is the Family Machine for the household. By power it will sew 50 per cent. faster than any shuttle machine, and has double the durability. It is for the interest of manufacturers of Heavy Clothing, Boots and Shoes, Harness, Carriage Trimmings, etc., to thoroughly test its merits.

The Highest Premium Fine Ladies' Shoes exhibited at Vienna, 1873, were stitched on this Machine.

The following testimonial is one of many of similar character: From EDWIN C. BURT'S Boot and Shoe Manufactory, 91 and 93 Thomas

Street, New York. To Shoe Manufacturers :-Having used all kinds of Sewing Machines that have been made for the last twenty years, in all branches of Fine Ladies' Boots and Shoes, I say of Wheeler & Wilson's new No. 6 Sewing Machine, that for beauty of stitch and firmness of seam, there is no machine in the market that sews work equal to it.

(Signed), HENRY C. LETSINGER, Superintendent for EDWIN C. BURT.

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Agencies in all the Chief

THE MEDICAL ECLECTIC.

ALEXANDER WILDER, M. D., ROBERT S. NEWTON, M. D.,

EDITORS.

Vol. I.]

SEPTEMBER 15, 1874.

[No. 5.

“Ever follow that which is good, both among yourselves and to all men.”--PAUL.

THE CLAIMS OF ECLECTIC COLLEGES.

REFORMED Medicine, to accomplish its work, must have Colleges at which its peculiar doctrines are taught, text-books in which they are distinctively set forth, and organization to maintain its integrity. Intelligent practitioners will perceive this at a glance, and as earnest and conscientious men, will do their part to accomplish the desired end. It is a breach of good fellowship, a lack of fidelity, a morbid or abortive Eclecticism, which will be supine and indifferent. The Eclectic School of Medicine depends upon the members of the societies for its standing and its future; and these in turn are enabled to exist and prosper through the institutions of instruction.

Eclectic Medicine is inculcated truly and truthfully only in Eclectic Medical Colleges. Outside of them it is passed over slightingly; and a candid, accurate and intelligent statement of our peculiar doctrines cannot be had. It is not to be supposed that knowledge, which men have employed a life-time to acquire, will be believed or carefully taught by individuals who have learned of it only at second hand, and with unfavorable prepossession. The graduate of a non-Eclectic College should study the Reformed Practice as a new beginner, or he will hardly become an accomplished Eclectic. “Neither do men put new

wine into old bottles; else the bottles break and the wine runneth out, and the bottles perish; but they put new wine into new bottles, and both are preserved.”

The contributions of Reformed Practitioners to medical knowledge are principally included in their improvements in Surgical practice, their sick-room hygiene and clinical treatment, and the introduction of invaluable remedies into the Materia-Medica, rendering the barbarous methods and medicines of old-time surgery and medicine, inexcusable as well as obsolete. We have made our progress with the law and public opinion against us; whereas other schools have been petted, patronized and subsidized from the public treasury. Yet we are not behind them in the useful knowledge of our vocation, while knowing much that Old School Colleges do not teach. So conscious of this fact are the physicians from those institutions, that they propose now to crush out the Eclectic School by “ sitting down upon it,” vilifying it and its members privately, but claiming its science as their own.

It is obvious, then, that to maintain Eclectic Medicine, we must stand by each other and support Eclectic Colleges. Genuine, whole-hearted Eclectics will always do this. Our brethren in England, conscious of the necessity have opened a school in London; and the Reformers of the Southern States, from like motive, have established at Macon, in Georgia, “ The College of American Medicine and Surgery.” God speed them both. There is but one other institution owning our faith east of the Alleghanies. Its claims and deserving are in no wise behind those of the Eclectic School elsewhere. It upholds the standard and has not flagged or budged. It is the principal agency for establishing the status of Eclectic medicine and Eclectic physicians in the Northern Atlantic States. But good offices are not all due on one side. If Reformed practitioners consult their own interest, if they have laudable professional enterprise, and a reasonable degree of conscientiousness, as well as fraternal sympathy for those engaged in the work, they will both sympathize and in their best practical manner co-operate. Indifference in this matter is not innocence. The College was established at the instance of the Eclectic physicians of the State and vicinity; and has carefully moved in its legitimate province. What is true here is true of the sister institutions in the West.

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