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30.

were filled, an increase of seventeen From the table given of trades and over the last quarter.

occupations of men placed it appears One of the examples of unreason

that every application for bookable demand on the part of employers applications for office boys, all of

keepers was supplied, 4 of the 7 is both pathetic and amusing. It was the applications for carpenters, 4.

of for a stableman to care for twenty the 5 applications for office clerks, horses, keep the stalls clean, learn 13 of the 22 applications for porters, from an old employé the care of and 5 of the 7 applications for useful sick horses (to save the expense of a

men-a good showing for the effi.

ciency of the Bureau in its relation veterinary), the hours being from

to the employers who sought its four in the morning until eight at help. night, with two hours for meals. As bearing upon the question of For this work, sixteen hours a

the age of applicants in relation to day, seven days in the week, he

the possibility of securing work, one

man of 65 years of age applied, and would receive $7 a week. We mor

was placed; 4 each at 59, 54, and alize somewhat nowadays to the dis 52; 14 at 45; 15 at 40; 8 at 39; 10 advantage of the work-seekers, be at 38; 12 at 35; 17 each at 31 and cause of the disproportion of men

Of those placed, 5 were 28 seeking work in fields of work that

years old, and only i man each of

any age greater than 28 was placed. are already over supplied to those who seek work in a field-for ex

Dr. G. Hudson Makuen, in his ample farming-in which the supply presidential address before the is not equal to the demand; but

Academy of Medicine, called attensuch a demand as that instanced

tion to the increase of crime, pauperconstitutes some excuse for the

ism, and mental deficiency, and said indisposition on the part of workless that the causes of this increase are men in the city to seek work in the

the non-uniform progress of civilizacountry.

tion and the attraction by the It is interesting to note in the

natural resources of the country schedule given the trades and occu

for foreigners of all conditions of pations of applicants, as compared He noted also to the evils of

physical and

mental

depravity with the kinds of labor wanted by promiscuous almsgiving and disemployers, the occupations of men pensary service, as well as of instituplaced, and the ages of applicants as

tionalism in the care and treatment compared with the ages of those

of the defective, dependent, and deplaced. Among the applicants were

linquent classes, and advocated re

stricted immigration, more stringent 29 bookkeepers, 41 office boys, 79 marriage laws, and, -in carefully se office clerks, 19 shipping clerks, 56 lected cases,—the entire removal of drivers, 24 laborers, and 60 porters. the power of procreation, also care. There were 22 applications from

ful education, the object of which

should be not so much the acquire. employers for porters, 5 for book

ment of knowledgment as the dekeepers, 5 for office clerks, 6 for

velopment of character and brain elevator men, 7 for useful

power.

men.

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The number of bathers who have in the history of the People's Baths. used the People's Baths of the New The receipts also are the largest in York Association for Improving the the history of the Baths. Condition of the Poor, during the month of June, was 17,665, of whom The state officers of Wisconsin are 12,340 were men, 2,759 were women, rigidly enforcing the child-labor law. 2,566 were children. This is an in Over two hundred children have crease of 905 over the corresponding recently been removed from emmonth last year, and is the largest ployment. The Assistant Inspector number of bathers in any one month reports that it is chiefly parents,

rather than employers, who wilfully of hospitals and other reliefs for the violate the law.

victims of overcrowding is said to be $650,000 a year.-Philadelphia Medical

Journal. The recent debate in the House of Commons on a government bill for the housing of the working HENRY ARDEN, classes revealed a very bad state of JAPANESE ART OBJECTS, affairs, notwithstanding all that has NOVELTIES IN SILKS FOR LADIES' USE, been done. The London County Silk CREPES AND GRASS LINENS, Council has rehoused 8,928 persons,

Pillow Covers, Etc., displacing 16,615, but meantime

38 WEST 22D STREET. London rents have doubled, with a fearful strain upon workingman's means. Statistics showed 900,000 persons living in an illegally crowded condition. In Camberwell seventeen

GOOD COUNSEL FARM, persons were found living and sleep WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. ing in one room. In the East End

Telephones, 86B and 124 White Plains. beds were let out to three sets of occupants daily, for eight hours each. The Public Health Act for

This Laundry is equipped with the best bids this; but it was said, “Of what

and latest machinery. use is it to eject from houses those whose only other sleeping-place is

It also offers the advantage of country the Thames embankment under the

bleaching. open sky.” The death rate from No acids are used. contagious diseases has gone up in Work is collected and returned in New the last thirty years from 101 and York and Westchester County by the 160 to 270 to the 1,000. The bill

American Express, without expense authorized a County Council to provide houses outside of its own district-it being found impossible

Special rates to Hotels and Families. to rehouse in London, so long as slum property has to be bought up on the greedy owner's terms. Mean

IN CHAROE OF THB SISTERS

OF THE DIVINE COMPASSION. while the expense to the taxpayers

to

customers.

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WYCKOFF, SEAMANS & BENEDICT, 327 BROADWAY, NEW YORK

The Official Organ of the Charity Organization Society of the City of New York.

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BY EDWARD T. DEVINE,
PROGRAM OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL IN
PHILANTHROPIC WORK.

The chief of all non-sectarian orLast week of the course, July 23-28 ; Mr.

ganizations is the state. Of the Edward T. Devine in charge.

agencies employed by the state the MONDAY, JULY 23.

most important for purposes of 9 A, M.-The Purpose and Scope of Settle

present comparison would be the ments; How far are their objects attained ; Mr. James B. Reynolds, Head Worker Uni public schools or the public sysversity Settlement. Visits to Vacation Schools and Play

tem for the relief of the poor. The grounds.

public school under our system is 8 P. M.-Social meeting with Mr. and Mis. Clarence Gordon; East-Side House, Foot

not an agency which is expected to East Seventy-sixth street. Topic :

accomplish the entire educational Social Basis and Bond of Settlement Work."

process. That task it shares with TUESDAY, JULY 24.

the family and the church, neither 9 A. M.-Vacation Schools ; Mr. Clarence E. Meleney, Assistant Superintendent De of which are governmental agencies, partment of Education New York city. Visits to some of the improved tenements.

and with what we sometimes call WEDNESDAY, JULY 25.

practical life, or in the cities by a 9 1. M.-Housing as a Municipal Move. grim figure of speech-the streetment; Dr. E. R. L. Gould, President City and Suburban Homes Co.

which is not an institution at all, or Visit to Sea Breeze, Coney Island, the if it is, not one that has been, as a Fresh-Air Home of the Association for Im. proving the Condition of the Poor.

scientist might say, isolated and THURSDAY, JULY 26.

described. The school is, however, 9. A. M.-Movement for Small Parks and the definite contribution-and it is Playgrounds.

8 P. M.-The Development of the Tene a very large one-made by the state ment; Lawrence Veiller, Secretary Tene. to the education of its future citiment-House Commission. Illustrated by stereopticon.

zens. Religion we have kept apart

from the state. We are not, there. positively, as the best means of fore, to rely upon the school for getting both parts of the work religious instruction or for the en done. It is not the only conceivcouragement of distinctly religious able plan. There are comparatively practices. If religion be only the few countries in which it is found. expression of the relation between It is not beyond criticism, but it is the individual and the universe, with us established beyond successthen the school also concerns itself ful attack, and it will serve as the in many ways with religion, but in best analogy for the special secular the narrower sense in which it means agencies which are in question. The the inculcation of particular doc- point then which I wish most to emtrines, instruction in particular forms phasize is that the heartiest friend of worship, reception into a particu- of the Sunday school, the most lar body of believers, intimate as earnest advocate of the necessity sociation with those of a particular for careful religious teaching of the household of faith, it is beyond young at home, the most generous the legitimate scope of the public defender of one's religious faith school. The right action may be whatever it may be, is almost sure taught, but it will be done without to be the teacher, or the parent who emphasis upon the religious sanction is in close touch with the school and for it.

knows just what is done in the The school is intrusted with the school-room. There the complexiduty of mental training, and to ties and the difficulties of the educa. some extent with the duty of physi- tional process are fully revealed, and cal, æsthetic, and moral training. the need for co-operation among all Great bodies of common knowledge the agencies which act for good upon are to be passed on from one gen the growing mind is established. eration to the next, national ideals Passing directly from the school and conceptions are to be kept to the private agencies which have alive, workers are to be fitted to to do with the poor in their homes, play their part in the economic and we find that there are similar reasons social order, and for these tasks the for a division of work. The attitude school is pre-eminently fitted. But towards religion of the worker in a the liberty of our diverse religious relief society, or a charity organizafaiths is not to be infringed, and the tion society, or any other secular solemn responsibility of religious in agency which deals with the poor struction is to be left unimpaired of many faiths, is to appreciate its upon the family or upon the re necessity and to leave it strictly ligious organizations to which the alone. family has in part intrusted it. The charity worker in not indif. Thus there is a division of work, ferent to the value of spiritual inadopted at first unconsciously and fluence in the reconstructive work gradually, then deliberately and which he has undertaken.

He sim

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