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PURITY OF CHARACTER AND MORALITY REQUIRED.

SEC. 5.—There is no profession from the members of which greater purity of character and a higher standard of moral excellence are required than the medical; and to attain such eminence is a duty every physician owes alike to the profession and to patients. It is due to the patients, as without it their respect and confidence can not be commanded; and to the profession, because no scientific attainments can compensate for the want of correct moral principles.

TEMPERANCE IN ALL THINGS.

Sec. 6.—It is incumbent on physicians to be temperate in all things, for the practice of medicine requires the unremitting exercise of a clear and vigorous understanding; and in emergencies—for which no physician should be unprepared—a steady hand, an acute eye, and an unclouded mind are essential to the welfare and even to the life of a human being.

ADVERTISING METIIODS TO BE AVOIDED.

SEC. 7.-It is incompatible with honorable standing in the profession to resort to public advertisement or private cards inviting the attention of persons affected with particular diseases; to promise radical cures; to publish cases or operations in the daily prints, or to suffer such publication to be made; to invite laymen .(other than relatives who may desire to be at hand) to be present at operations; to boast of cures and remedies; to adduce certificates of skill and success, or to employ any of the other methods of charlatans.

PATENTS AND SECRET NOSTRUMS.

SEC. 8.—It is equally derogatory to professional character for physicians to hold patents for any surgical instruments or medicines; to accept rebates on prescriptions or surgical appliances; to assist unqualified persons to evade legal restrictions governing the practice of medicine; or to dispense, or promote the use of, secret medicines, for if such nostrums are of real efficacy, any concealment regarding them is inconsistent with beneficence and professional liberality, and if mystery alone give them public notoriety, such craft implies either disgraceful ignorance or fraudulent avarice. It is highly reprehensible for physicians to give certificates attesting the efficacy of secret medicines, or other substances used therapeutically.

ARTICLE II.-PROFESSIONAL SERVICES OF PHY.

SICIANS TO EACH OTHER.

PHYSICIANS DEPENDENT ON EACH OTHER.

SECTION 1.-Physicians should not, as a general rule, undertake the treatment of themselves, nor of members of their family. In such circumstances they are peculiarly dependent on each other; therefore, kind offices and professional aid should always be cheerfully and gratuitously afforded. These visits ought not, however, to be obtrusively made, as they may give rise to embarrassment or interfere with that free choice on which such confidence depends.

GRATUITOUS SERVICES TO FELLOW PHYSICIANS.

SEC. 2.-All practicing physicians and their immediate family dependents are entitled to the gratuitous services of any one or more of the physicians residing near them.

COMPENSATION FOR EXPENSES,

Sec. 3.—When a physician is summoned from a distance to the bedside of a colleague in easy financial circumstances, a compensation, proportionate to traveling expenses and to the pecuniary loss entailed by absence from the accustomed field of professional labor, should be made by the patient or relatives.

ONE PHYSICIAN TO TAKE CHARGE. Sec. 4.-When more than one physician is attending another, one of the number should take charge of the case, otherwise the concert of thought and action so essential to wise treatment can not be assured.

ATTENTION TO ABSENT PHYSICIAN'S PATIENTS.

SEC. 5.—The affairs of life, the pursuit of health, and the various accidents and contingencies to which a physician is peculiarly exposed, sometimes require the temporary withdrawal of this physician from daily professional labor and the appointment of a colleague to act for a specified time. The colleague's compliance is an act of courtesy which should always be performed with the utmost consideration for the interest and character of the family physician.

ARTICLE III.—THE DUTIES OF PHYSICIANS IN

REGARD TO CONSULTATIONS.

THE BROADEST HUMANITY IN EMERGENCIES RE

QUIRED. SECTION 1.-The broadest dictates of humanity should be obeyed by physicians whenever and wherever their services are needed to meet the emergencies of disease or accident.

CONSULTATIONS SHOULD BE PROMOTED. SEC. 2.-Consultations should be promoted in difficult cases, as they contribute to confidence and more enlarged views of practice.

PUNCTUALITY IN CONSULTATIONS. SEC. 3.—The utmost punctuality should be observed in the visits of physicians when they are to hold consultations, and this is generally practicable, for society has been so considerate as to allow the plea for a professional engagement to take precedence over all others.

NECESSARY DELAYS. Sec. 4.-As professional engagements may sometimes cause delay in attendance, the physician who first arrives should wait for a reasonable time, after which the consultation should be considered as postponed to a new appointment. GOOD FEELING AND CANDOR IN CONSULTATIONS.

SEC. 5.—In consultations no insincerity, rivalry or envy should be indulged; candor, probity and all due respect should be observed toward the physician in charge of the case.

UNAUTHORIZED

STATEMENTS

OR

DISCUSSIONS.

Sec. 6.—No statement or discussion of the case should take place before the patient or

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